D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Sat Aug 31, 2019 6:58 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.

We are going to talk about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, about the position for holding the guitar, and finally about some techniques, exercises and pieces.



Timetable for the fourth year student:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary for players of this level :
3 days when you can devote 20 minutes to repeating each difficult passage 9 to 16 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 50 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 20 minutes practicing the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 15 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 3 hours 30 minutes in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 15 and 40 minutes:
Monday 50 minutes
Tuesday 20 minutes
Wednesday 50 minutes
Thursday 20 minutes
Friday 50 minutes
Saturday 20 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.
Finally, choose a chair of a height that allows your thigh to be horizontal, so that your guitar will be supported in a
stable manner. If your thigh is angled in one direction or the other, your guitar will slip and interfere with your playing.



Let us start with a little exercise to warm up the hands:
bend the fingers several times from the first (large) joint
bend them at the middle joint
bend at the middle joint until the fingertips touch the palm, then (maintaining contact with the palm) draw the fingertips as far up as possible before stretching the fingers out again.
Slide the thumb along the length of each of the four fingers in turn
Slide each of the four fingers in turn along the thumb.



Next we will look at, or revise, pages 26 and 58 of volume D01
- page 26 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 58 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) BUTÉ - APOYANDO - REST STROKE - APOYANDO
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stroke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. Working on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and perseverence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.







Let us now look at some exercises from volume D04.
- Page 126 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) STRING DAMPING
These techniques are essential in polyphonic playing. Guitar playing is unique in that we must stop the resonances, in particular those of the open strings. Without these string damping techniques, polyphony is blurred by dissonance.





Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces, pages 65, 87, 91 and 102.

- page 65 Giuliani, Mauro Allegro opus 50 n°13
In these arpeggios, be careful to maintain the stability of your right hand. The right-hand fingering is typical of arpeggios in that the "a" finger plays the first string, the "m" finger plays the second, the "i" finger plays the third, and the thumb plays the 3 bass strings. In this piece, the melody is in the bass.


- page 87 Tárrega, Francisco Preludio
Shape the rising and falling passages by using crescendo and decrescendo.


- page 91 Tárrega, Francisco Estudio ostinato, en la mayor
To bring out the two voices in this little piece, play legato for the melody in the bass, and staccato for the repeated phrase (ostinato) in semiquavers (16th notes).


- page 102 Foret, Stéphanie Bretonneuse
Bars 17, 18, 21 and 22: the small quavers (8th notes) with a line through them are acciaccaturas http://www.dolmetsch.com/musictheory23.htm#grace . Here the acciaccaturas are played by sliding rapidly with the finger indicated from the small note to the normal-sized note. The line linking the two notes represents this slide.
You will see that each phrase consists of a total of 8 measures. The bass line is made up of two notes: A (the dominant) and D (the tonic). Bretonneuse is in the Dorian mode. Vary the tone used so that you never play two phrases in succession with the same tone.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 58 (D01) : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) BUTÉ - APOYANDO - REST STROKE - APOYANDO
- page 126 (D04) Delcamp, Jean-François Terminer - Fermare - Damp – Apagar
- page 91 (D04) Tárrega, Francisco Estudio ostinato, en la mayor
- page 102 (D04) Foret, Stéphanie Bretonneuse



Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

BUTÉ - APOYANDO - REST STROKE - APOYANDO
Terminer - Fermare - Damp – Apagar
Estudio ostinato, en la mayor
Bretonneuse
:( + ♫ = :)

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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:49 pm

Hello, D04 classmates.

This year will be very difficult and interesting for me to learn both D03 and D04. :chaud:
Here are my recordings except OSTINATO and PRELUDIO. I'm having hard time doing Staccato on OSTINATO. It's certainly not easy at all. :shock:
I'm still working on both pieces and will post them soon.

Any advice is welcome. :D




Last edited by Ken Kim on Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

JohnEllis
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by JohnEllis » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:02 pm

They all sound good, Ken.
I like how you played the second part of Bretonneuse closer to the bridge for a change of tone.
John

If music be the food of love, play on. --Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, 1.1

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:07 pm

Excellent again Ken! You did a great job varying the dynamics and timbre by moving your RH closer and farther from the bridge. Again, there are some intonation/tuning issues.

There is a great YouTube video by Benjamin Xander with a guitarist. He tells him to "take all the time you need but make sure youre instrument is in tune."
watch it here

All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:24 pm

JohnEllis wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:02 pm
They all sound good, Ken.
I like how you played the second part of Bretonneuse closer to the bridge for a change of tone.
Thank you much, John. :merci:
Prof. Delcamp wrote 'Vary the tone used so that you never play two phrases in succession with the same tone.'.
I'm glad you liked it. :)
Last edited by Ken Kim on Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:32 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:07 pm
Excellent again Ken! You did a great job varying the dynamics and timbre by moving your RH closer and farther from the bridge. Again, there are some intonation/tuning issues.
There is a great YouTube video by Benjamin Xander with a guitarist. He tells him to "take all the time you need but make sure youre instrument is in tune."
watch it here
Thank you again, Tutor Rick. I just found out my maple Hauser have some intonation problem on 2nd and 3rd string.
I need to tone down a little on open. Never noticed that before you mentioned it and it didn't bother me at all. :lol:
I never checked or tried to tune other frets than open strings. Good to know about new knowledge and very appreciated for educational video. :okok:
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

Colin Bullock
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Colin Bullock » Mon Sep 02, 2019 12:36 pm

Welcome to Delcamp Guitar Forum Lesson D01.
I’m your moderator for this lesson, here to help with the smooth running of the forum.
I will be updating the list of qualifying videos once a week.

On the musical side we expect students to support each other. This English forum does have Student Tutors who will try to help but their time is limited and they might not be able to answer all questions. Although I’m not a tutor, if the tutors are not available I will try to answer any musical questions you have using my own experience.

There is guidance on the forum basics here viewtopic.php?f=41&t=126025

If you have any questions do ask.
I hope you enjoy the lessons.

Good to see you back Ken and first off the blocks! :bravo:

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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Mon Sep 02, 2019 1:01 pm

Colin Bullock wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 12:36 pm
Good to see you back Ken and first off the blocks! :bravo:
Thank you much, Colin. :merci:
Good to be back! :ouioui:
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

Ed Butler
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ed Butler » Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:56 pm

Ken - very impressive, especially since the exercises only came out a couple of days ago. I don't think my fingers will ever move as fast as yours. Quick question - where do your i-m-a fingers first touch the string? From the video it appears your fingers are close to parallel, which would tell me they are hitting the string/nail towards the middle of the finger. I have been trying to get them to hit on the left side of the finger/nail but to do that I feel my fingers are coming to the string too "slanted".

Again, well done. You have already set the bar high.

Ed
Cordoba C7

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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:18 pm

Ed Butler wrote:
Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:56 pm
Ken - very impressive, especially since the exercises only came out a couple of days ago. I don't think my fingers will ever move as fast as yours. Quick question - where do your i-m-a fingers first touch the string? From the video it appears your fingers are close to parallel, which would tell me they are hitting the string/nail towards the middle of the finger. I have been trying to get them to hit on the left side of the finger/nail but to do that I feel my fingers are coming to the string too "slanted". Again, well done. You have already set the bar high.
:merci: Thank you much for your generous comment, Ed.

Please, don't count on my words much since I was lower level than you :mrgreen:, but this is what I am thinking.

[I don't think my fingers will ever move as fast as yours.]- I believe you can. It is hard to find YouTube videos about lightness of stroke. You might need to consider about some easy simple practice of stroke lightness. When you practice for lightness of your RH stroke, nothing should be considered such as tone production and dynamic. You just concentrate on lightness and speed of you RH and it is ok to be ppp.(pianinssimo) It will get stronger eventually. Easy practice of lightness is free stroke on open strings with i-m-i-m, m-a-m-a, i-a-i-a. Only think about lightness then speed. Nothing should be considered except for lightness. You might see some result in a week.

[Where do your i-m-a fingers first touch the string?]- Between Left and middle side of flesh first then nail right away. :)

I look forward to seeing your recordings. :bye:
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

Ed Butler
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Posts: 543
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2016 11:46 am
Location: Plymouth, MA, USA

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ed Butler » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:32 pm

Ken - thank you. Great suggestions. I will be practicing "lightness and speed" daily.

Ed
Cordoba C7

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jules Wilkins » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:54 am

Ken Kim wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:49 pm
Hello, D04 classmates.

This year will be very difficult and interesting for me to learn both D03 and D04. :chaud:
Here are my recordings except OSTINATO and PRELUDIO. I'm having hard time doing Staccato on OSTINATO. It's certainly not easy at all. :shock:
I'm still working on both pieces and will post them soon.

Any advice is welcome. :D
Ha. First you set the bar high with your excellent submissions, then you threaten to set it still higher! :lol: I can see that it will not be easy posting comparable efforts, which of course is very good indeed.
Today is my first glance at the course, and I will also be doing lower courses to make sure I don't miss too much with the basics being as I dropped out before. Not sure how long it will take me to post anything here. New guitar, and new video recording setup to figure out too.
Sorry that I have no constructive critique...it just looks and sounds pretty good to me.

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:01 am

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jules Wilkins » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:55 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:07 pm
There is a great YouTube video by Benjamin Xander with a guitarist. He tells him to "take all the time you need but make sure youre instrument is in tune."
I just listened to this and enjoyed it much. Thanks for posting it.

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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Tue Sep 03, 2019 3:48 am

Jules Wilkins wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:54 am
Ha. First you set the bar high with your excellent submissions, then you threaten to set it still higher! :lol: I can see that it will not be easy posting comparable efforts, which of course is very good indeed.
Today is my first glance at the course, and I will also be doing lower courses to make sure I don't miss too much with the basics being as I dropped out before. Not sure how long it will take me to post anything here. New guitar, and new video recording setup to figure out too.
Sorry that I have no constructive critique...it just looks and sounds pretty good to me.
Thank you, Jules.
There are better players in this D04 group and you'll be surprised.
Why don't you register for the courses first?
Ken

♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥♫✥

Robert England Hauser / Amalio Burguet Especial
Cordoba C12SP, Torres & Rodriguez
Yamaha Silent SLG200NW / Ryoji Matsuoka M60

User avatar
Rick Beauregard
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Rick Beauregard » Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:45 pm

Jules Wilkins wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 2:54 am
Ken Kim wrote:
Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:49 pm
Hello, D04 classmates.

This year will be very difficult and interesting for me to learn both D03 and D04. :chaud:
Here are my recordings except OSTINATO and PRELUDIO. I'm having hard time doing Staccato on OSTINATO. It's certainly not easy at all. :shock:
I'm still working on both pieces and will post them soon.

Any advice is welcome. :D
Ha. First you set the bar high with your excellent submissions, then you threaten to set it still higher! :lol: I can see that it will not be easy posting comparable efforts, which of course is very good indeed.
Today is my first glance at the course, and I will also be doing lower courses to make sure I don't miss too much with the basics being as I dropped out before. Not sure how long it will take me to post anything here. New guitar, and new video recording setup to figure out too.
Sorry that I have no constructive critique...it just looks and sounds pretty good to me.
I hope you jest and won’t be discouraged by students who may be at s higher skill level than you may be. Everyone is at a different level and some are able to practice more than others. As long as you meet the minimum practice requirements of Prof Delcamp you will get better.

The videos should be viewed as a learning opportunity not necessarily as a final recital level performance. When you watch some who make everything look easy, don’t Judge your skill level against that standard, but use it as a challenge to get better. Some are faster learners or have spent more time on things than you may have.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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