D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

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Tom Wimsatt
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Wed Sep 04, 2019 8:13 pm

Ed Butler wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 4:37 pm
First attempt at the ALLEGRO. Less concerned -until next version - about the stumbles but more focused on tone (which I worked on the summer) and "lightness and speed" from Ken's recommendation.

Nice work Ed. I'd say both tone AND tempo were pretty good. Arpeggio's are definitely your strong point. I thought it was also a good idea to let some things go at first, and not focus on too many things at once when figuring out a piece. Ken made a similar suggestion to me some time back (I was tensing up).
1989 Takamine C132S, Aquila 19C strings

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jules Wilkins » Thu Sep 05, 2019 5:14 am

Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 8:08 pm
Here's my attempt at Allegretto opus 50 n°13. Tried to minimize buzzing strings and missed notes....
Hey there Tom...loved the harmonic at the end. Way to make the music yours. :bravo:

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jules Wilkins » Thu Sep 05, 2019 6:00 am

Ed Butler wrote:
Tue Sep 03, 2019 4:37 pm
First attempt at the ALLEGRO. Less concerned -until next version - about the stumbles but more focused on tone (which I worked on the summer) and "lightness and speed" from Ken's recommendation.

Hello Ed. Good to see your marked improvement from when I last heard you some 18 months age.
As you clearly state that you were focused on tone that is what I listened for, and given that I heard nothing objectionable such as buzzing I would have to conclude that you did a pretty good job in accomplishing your goal.
I agree with Tom that arpeggios seem to be your strong point, but as you continue to practice this piece I would love to see you slow the treble combinations down to the point where your bass notes can catch up, most especially in measures 9 and 10.
Actually, I have to wonder whether your fingers struggle to keep the correct timing (requiring muscle training, a totally different problem) or you simply don't fully understand the timing, so at the risk of explaining something you already know...
The base notes are quarter notes, and the treble notes start with a 1/16 rest followed by three 1/16 notes for a total of 4 1/16 counts = 4/16= 1/4 = the length of the base note. The base line and the treble line are independent harmonic melodies. By independent I mean that both lines have their own timing which has nothing to do with the timing of the other line. By harmonic I mean that both lines are to be played at the same time with the notes producing harmony (two or more notes sounding at once, though in this case not struck at the same time). By melody I mean a line of notes played in succession paying attention to the duration of each note. In other words, you should strike the base note at the point where the treble has a rest (first 1/16) followed immediately by the three treble notes in succession (the next three 1/16) followed immediately again by the next grouping of base and treble notes. To count the measure you might say "one de and de two de and de three de and de four de and de" with the base notes played on the one, two, three and four beats and the treble notes played on the "de and de" beats. You seem to be playing the base note and holding it for a full 1/4 beat followed by three 1/16 notes as if they were part of the same line. If that is on purpose then I hope my explanation is clear. If you are just struggling to play legato but your fingers wont yet allow it then please accept my apology along with my encouragement to continue working on tempo.
Finally, if I am correct in my guess but you cannot follow my explanation then let me know and I will make a quick video that should explain it better.
I look forward to seeing your continued improvement.

Ed Butler
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ed Butler » Thu Sep 05, 2019 12:01 pm

Jules -

thank you for the comments and recommendations. At a high-level I understand what you are saying, but I will need to read it 3 or 4 more times and then slowly add it to the practice of the piece before I can really say I understand it. Very glad to have you back.

Ed
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Ed Butler
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ed Butler » Thu Sep 05, 2019 2:49 pm

First attempts at the rest stroke and damping exercises





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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ed Butler » Thu Sep 05, 2019 2:52 pm

Hi Tom

Very nice flow from start to end. And with Jules, loved the harmonic.

Ed
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Tom Wimsatt
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Thu Sep 05, 2019 4:12 pm

Ed Butler wrote:
Thu Sep 05, 2019 2:52 pm
Hi Tom

Very nice flow from start to end. And with Jules, loved the harmonic.

Ed
Thanks folks. I couldn't resist a little fooling around with the ending.
1989 Takamine C132S, Aquila 19C strings

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Mike Cook
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Cook » Thu Sep 05, 2019 4:45 pm

Hello, D04 classmates.
This year will be very difficult and interesting for me to learn both D03 and D04. :chaud:


Nice work Ken. The rest stroke exercise is giving my fits with the G string - maybe my fingers are too big! :oops: . You seem yo have mastered it. Your overall technique is awesome. :bravo: My only suggestion is to focus more on the musicality of your playing.


BTW - I am still trying to figure out how to properly reply to a particular post.

Mike
2019 Elias Bonet Monne Traditional Cedar/Green Ebony
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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Thu Sep 05, 2019 5:34 pm

Mike Cook wrote:
Thu Sep 05, 2019 4:45 pm
Nice work Ken. The rest stroke exercise is giving my fits with the G string - maybe my fingers are too big! :oops: . You seem yo have mastered it. Your overall technique is awesome. :bravo: My only suggestion is to focus more on the musicality of your playing.
BTW - I am still trying to figure out how to properly reply to a particular post.
Mike
Welcome back and thank you much, Mike. :merci:
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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Thu Sep 05, 2019 5:48 pm

Ed Butler wrote:
Thu Sep 05, 2019 2:49 pm
First attempts at the rest stroke and damping exercises
Nice efforts on both exercises but... :?
You didn't do thumb rest stroke at all. IMHO, exercise #16 is critical to show you whether you mastered well about basic rest stroke or not.
Many students can't do #16 well. Your rest stroke on both Thumb and i-m-a should be balanced to do #16.
Please, don't give up rest stroke on your thumb. :chaud:
All these exercises are introduced from D01 to D04. These exercises should be important somehow. :bye:
Ken

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Jules Wilkins
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jules Wilkins » Thu Sep 05, 2019 5:59 pm

Ed Butler wrote:
Thu Sep 05, 2019 12:01 pm
Jules -

thank you for the comments and recommendations. At a high-level I understand what you are saying, but I will need to read it 3 or 4 more times and then slowly add it to the practice of the piece before I can really say I understand it. Very glad to have you back.

Ed
I have now heard your most recent exercises. Bearing in mind that 18 months of obvious hard work on your part have elapsed, you might understand why I was so pleasantly surprised and impressed to see how well you did on those exercises, especially the first three, and how far you have clearly come.

My most important conclusion from this is that you are able to tell your fingers what to do. Training your muscles is something you can do and are doing. Rest stroke with the thumb is not easy, playing two notes at precisely the same time with the thumb and a finger is not easy. Having the thumb bounce back to dampen a string and then return to position to play another bass note is not easy, and putting all three of these things together in a single exercise as you have done proves my point. If you have any doubt about how far you have come, turn your guitar the other way around to switch hands and try to play something. You have come from that level of skill to where you are now!

The second most important conclusion (or maybe just suspicion) is that your ability to read the timing of the individual notes is easily the most important thing in my opinion that you need to improve. Your skill in this area appears to lag miles behind your mechanical skills. If I am correct and if I can convince you to spend some serious study, then I promise you that your playing (and enjoyment of the instrument) will improve by leaps and bounds within a very short period of time. Even when you still make mechanical errors (if we didn’t all do those then we belong in a higher level) the fact that you are playing more legato and remaining true to the timing would hugely compensate! I am told that Judy Garland did not hit every note when she sang Over The Rainbow, but so what…it sounded pretty darn good to me. Correct timing is so very important.

To this end I did an internet search and found the following:



Much of this will be by way of review, but I encourage you to nonetheless do every exercise there starting from the first making certain you fully understand the duration of every note and rest and you can ace every one of them. Your single goal is to solidify your understanding of timing.

In fact, I noticed that some of the timing gets fairly difficult towards the end, so I will be doing them myself. Understanding in ones head is good, but being able to sight read a piece with complex timing is quite another thing and an important skill to master.

There is a weakness in those exercises though, as they only ever deal with a single melody. Rather than explain this further in text I will make a short video to explain this using Opus 50 no 13 as the example. After you fully understand the first 50 or so exercises you will be able to benefit from my video.

My goal is to hear you play Opus 50 with perfect timing. I don’t care if you play it painfully slow. I don’t care if I hear strings buzzing or if you play the occasional wrong note. I don't care about the tone or volume or anything else. Those will be relatively easy to correct. If you can nail the timing though you will make me very happy.

Make me happy.

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Ken Kim
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ken Kim » Thu Sep 05, 2019 8:57 pm

Hi, all.

Here you go my Preludio Penatatonica. I tried my best to be pleasant to listen but Metronomic :?: people might not like this. :lol:
Estudio Ostinato is the only one to go and Staccato on treble is killing me.

Any advice is welcome. :bye:

Last edited by Ken Kim on Sat Sep 07, 2019 7:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ken

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Ed Butler
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ed Butler » Thu Sep 05, 2019 9:29 pm

Hi Ken - thanks for pointing the missing thumb rest stroke out. Due to various injuries in the past, my right thumb is bent upwards, forcing me to curl the thumb on a stroke if I want to use the nail making the rest stroke awkward.. I plan to work on this for the next couple of weeks and hopefully post a better video next time.

Ed
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Ed Butler » Thu Sep 05, 2019 9:32 pm

Jules - I need to be away the next. couple of days, but when I come back I will immediately dive into this video. Thank you for all of your help.

Ed
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JohnEllis
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by JohnEllis » Fri Sep 06, 2019 12:18 am

Tom,
Your Giuliani Allegro sounds great.
I echo what everyone else said about your musical flourish at the end. Nice touch :)
John

If music be the food of love, play on. --Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, 1.1

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