D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:44 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the new version of volume D03 that I updated today.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- page 90, numbers 16, 17 - Jean-François DELCAMP - SCALES
When changes of position are needed, you will be using the "position shift" technique. Position I is the left hand position where the index finger (1) is placed behind the 1st fret, position V is the hand position where the index (1) is placed behind the fifth fret, etc. The position shift involves moving the left hand along the neck, from position to position, from fret to fret. In the scales we're looking at today, notice that my first finger never leaves the first string, I use it as a guide for my hand. Position shifts are shown by oblique lines linking two fingering indications given for the same finger.
The following videos are for numbers 16, 17 on page 90. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, and do your best to perfect the position shift technique.





- Page 95, numbers 32, 33, 34, 35, 36. Jean-François DELCAMP - SLURS
We have already worked on the rest stroke (apoyando) with the fingers of the right hand. Now we are going to work on doing a rest stroke with the fingers of the left hand. That is the best way to learn how to execute descending slurs.








Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces, pages 39, 42, 43, 56 et 58.
- page 39 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
Practise playing this arpeggio while keeping 3 fingers on the strings throughout. Doing it this way will teach you to make the necessary finger movement without it triggering involuntary and unwanted movements by the other fingers.





- pages 42-43 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) VALSE




- page 56 Niccolò PAGANINI (1782-1840) GHIRIBIZZO n°1
There are numerous repetitions, so vary the tone colour to avoid monotony. To obtain different tone colours, play:
- over the soundhole (the sound volume is at its best here and you get a good balance between the bass and treble notes);
- over the fingerboard (the sound here is softer, closer to the that of a clarinet, and the basses are softened);
- near the bridge (the sound here is more metallic, and becomes close to that of the harpsichord, the basses are strengthened and the trebles weakened).




- page 58 Dionisio AGUADO (1784-1849) LECCION N°19
Practise playing this arpeggio while keeping 2 fingers on the strings throughout. Doing it this way will teach you to make the necessary finger movement without it triggering involuntary and unwanted movements by the other fingers.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 39 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
- page 56 Niccolò PAGANINI (1782-1840) GHIRIBIZZO n°1



Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Goran Penic
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1


Coen van Dijk
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Mark Bacon
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114

Ned Henderson
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Stewart Doyle
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Richard Judge
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Ross Step
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Jack Jarrett
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Richard Lawrence
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Marko Räsänen
PRELUDE N°4 opus 114
GHIRIBIZZO n°1
:( + ♫ = :)

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Goran Penic
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Goran Penic » Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:54 am

Jean-François Delcamp wrote:Hello everyone,
...
Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces, pages 41, 42, 43, 56 et 58.
- page 41 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) PRELUDE N°4 opus 114

- pages 42-43 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) VALSE
...
Jean-François

Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) PRELUDE N°4 opus 114 is on page 39?
:bye:

UPLOADS:

Jean-François DELCAMP - SCALES

Jean-François DELCAMP - SLURS

Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) PRELUDE N°4 opus 114

Coen van Dijk
Goran Penic
Mark Bacon
Ned Henderson
Stewart Doyle
Richard Judge
Coen van Dijk
Mark Bacon
Richard Judge
Ross Step

Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) VALSE

Coen van Dijk
Goran Penic
Mark Bacon
Richard Judge
Jack Jarrett
Ross Step

Niccolò PAGANINI (1782-1840) GHIRIBIZZO n°1

Coen van Dijk
Ned Henderson
Goran Penic
Ross Step
Richard Judge
Stewart Doyle
Jack Jarrett
Goran Penic
Coen van Dijk
Richard Judge

Dionisio AGUADO (1784-1849) LECCION N°19

Goran Penic
Coen van Dijk
Stewart Doyle
Jack Jarrett
Mark Bacon
Last edited by Goran Penic on Mon Jan 30, 2012 4:31 pm, edited 16 times in total.
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
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GeoffB
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by GeoffB » Tue Jan 10, 2012 1:18 pm

Thanks, Goran, it looks as though it's been fixed now.

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

"Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it." - Steven Wright

Stewart Doyle

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Stewart Doyle » Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:18 pm

Jean-François Delcamp wrote: I advise you to work on all the exercises and the four pieces for a week. From February 22nd, please record and upload your recordings of the following:
I'm sure the regular students will spot the typo, but I think the date needs adjusting to be around 17th January?

Regards,

Stewart

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Jean-François Delcamp
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:23 pm

updated :
Jean-François Delcamp wrote:I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
:merci: Stewart
:( + ♫ = :)

Stewart Doyle

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Stewart Doyle » Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:02 pm

Hi everyone,

I'd welcome any views on bars 6 and 7 in Carulli's prelude. I find the suggested fingering in bar 7 quite unnatural. I'm wondering about moving finger 2 from the F# in bar 6 onto the low E for bar 7. Finger 3 would move from the D in bar 6 onto the C# in bar 7 to make, for me at least, a comfortable A chord with finger 1 providing stability. [I think I used to play the A chord like this in my youth!]

So, should I stick to the original fingering because (1) It's what M. Delcamp has indicated and (2) it's a useful technique to master or should we go with what we find easiest?

I'm looking forward to recording both pieces. I feel as though I should try to 'read' the Paganini but suspect I'll largely end up playing it by ear. My sight reading is lamentable above the 5th fret!

:merci: in advance for any advice/thoughts

Ned Henderson

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Ned Henderson » Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:49 pm

Hi Stewart

I haven't really started on this lesson yet but on first glance the suggested LH fingering doesn't make sense to me either. I guess I am going to have to try playing it as marked to see whether I can do it but for me it would not be a natural way of playing an A major chord.
My inclination is to try and play the pieces first as marked by M. Delcamp, assuming he has his reasons - but if it really goes against the grain and you can/t make it work for you, I would suggest moving on to whatever fingering works best for you. If anything occurs once I've practised it a bit, I will get back to you. Maybe someone else has some useful thoughts on this?

Ned

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Goran Penic
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Goran Penic » Fri Jan 13, 2012 1:12 am

Sterwart, look this Video: :arrow: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvB1FuwQ ... ature=plcp
or this discussion on French forum :arrow: http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... 93#p252997
I play A chord with 1, 2 and 3 fingers, but I will try the proposed combination.
:bye:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Jack Jarrett

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jack Jarrett » Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:35 am

Stewart,
The fingering suggested by M. Delcamp in bar 7 is actually quite common, from what I have seen in various classical guitar books. It does take practice, but eventually you will be able to bend the index finger enough to clear the high E string, without it feeling quite so unnatural. I think this allows us the use of of fingers 3 and 4 to play notes when needed in other pieces.
Jack

Stewart Doyle

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Stewart Doyle » Fri Jan 13, 2012 9:16 am

:merci: Ned, Goran, Jack and M. Delcamp - what a fantastic place this is! :D

Your very helpful replies have convinced me that I should stick to the suggested fingering. Ned helped reinforce my gut feeling that we should always strive to follow our teacher's advice. My french isn't great, but thanks to Goran, I'm now aware that it seems the same query has been raised in the french forum, and M. Delcamp has very kindly provided an image and video to clarify. That makes it definitely the way to go for me, but it was also very useful to hear from Jack that he's seen the fingering before and I can imagine there are times when the third (and fourth) fingers need to be stretched elsewhere.

Thanks again

Stewart

Mark Bacon
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Mark Bacon » Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:39 pm

Stewart Doyle wrote:
My sight reading is lamentable above the 5th fret!
Stewart,

I'm away from a guitar right now so cannot address your fingering question. It sounds like you've already gotten some good feedback from the others though. I wanted to share something with you (and perhaps others) for reading high notes that's helped me a lot.

I'm sure (or at least hope...or this may fall flat) that at some point you were shown that the 5 spaces of the treble clef spell the word FACE, as a device to help reading standard notation. Well, I've come to visualize the "3 FACES" of the staff. The spaces as I just mentioned, naturally. The other two "FACES" are sets of lines, not spaces. One (less useful?) FACE starts with the low F that appears three lines below the staff, taking you up to the first normal line of the staff (E). The third FACE is the one that I hope helps you out. It starts with the top line of the staff and then takes you to 3 ledger lines above, the high E or 12th fret of the top string. Naturally we occasionally have to play notes higher than this but it's fairly uncommon especially at our intermediate level. :bye:

Now in writing this I'm realizing that you might have meant you're not comfortable in knowing the notes on the fretboard (as opposed to the staff). Can't think of anything off the top of my head to help you there. All I remember is learning every note on the fretboard through brute force back when I was a rock player. Either way, hope this helps!!

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Coen van Dijk
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Coen van Dijk » Sat Jan 14, 2012 6:19 am

Hi all I was away on holidays, so I did not post to much, sorry.......

Steward,
about the fingering, I agree with Jack. I have also seen it before. Also for the 4th finger ( I cant do that yet) there are examples (f.i. "Evocacion by Merlin", to be found here on the forum, fingering by Dirk *** Site blocked for copyright reasons ***) With the 1st finger I can do it, but it took practice. Just try it slowly and suddenly it wil make "click".

About the reading problem higher up the neck: I am struggeling there too. First I dont know the names of the notes at first glance, secondly I dont know were they are instantly. However, I keep forcing myselve to first name the notes in the pieces (AND the scales!) and then look them up on the neck. Having heard the piece before hand confirms if I was right or wrong. It is time consuming, but there is no other way I think. I can read the notes untill fret 5 pretty fast. I, and you too I am sure, will learn it in time for higher up the neck too.

I attached a pdf (reference unknown, I have it for ages already) that shows all notes available for a classical guitar, and where they are on the neck. It is in Dutch, because being Dutch myselve, I read that most easy. But I think I is selve explainatory. I keep the sheet on my note stand so I can quickly grab it when needed.

Another tip: Mr Delcamp fingering is very good, I think. If you are in a certain position, and you have to plant finger 2, 3 or 4 it almost always means you have to be on fret 2, 3 or 4 subsequently, relatve to the fretwhere finger 1 is. This helps a lot in guessing where the correct note on the neck is. However, I try to keep my eyes on the sheet music so my brain will hopefully save the image of the notes sometime so I know where they are. Still, knowing the notes names is an advantage when there are # or b involved.

Hope this helps.
KEEP TRYING! :chaud:



:contrat:
40 notes.pdf

AT Mark: The FACES-thing sound interesting, but I never heard of it and I cant visualise it. Is there any way you can show me/us by means of a picture/pdf/word file?
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Last edited by Coen van Dijk on Mon Jan 16, 2012 6:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

Mark Bacon
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Mark Bacon » Sat Jan 14, 2012 2:15 pm

Coen van Dijk wrote: AT Mark: The FACES-thing sound interesting, but I never heard of it and I cant visualise it. Is there any way you can show me/us by means of a picture/pdf/word file?

Crude...but I hope this helps. This has helped me to visualize notes on the staff. (It just occurred to me that this may be of little help to our non-English speaking members. If that's the case.... :oops: )

Again, learning them on the fretboard takes time. I remembered that practicing scales on one string at a time was what helped me in that department.
staff.jpg
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Goran Penic
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Goran Penic » Sun Jan 15, 2012 12:58 am

Hello to everyone. :bye:
Here is my first video in this lesson:

[media]https://youtu.be/EagHgr3yFGs[/media]

:merci: for watching
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Jack Jarrett

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jack Jarrett » Sun Jan 15, 2012 5:41 am

:merci: Mark, as simple as this FACE example is, it is so helpful!Why have't I seen this before? I am still working on memorizing the fret board at the higher frets, it is still helpful to see this example. I must say that it is only through reading various pieces that force me to play these positions and from repetition that I am becoming better at remembering these notes, what they look like written, and where to find them on the fretboard. I have also found that if I memorized the 12th fret EADGBE,and the 5th ADGCEA, 7th BEADF#B, etc. it just starts to click, and though I can't just look at music without the initial fingering suggestions and know which position to play it at, it is slowly becoming easier to recognize where I should be playing.
To anyone struggling with all this, all I can say is keep working at it, playing scales, reading music, thinking, and working at it. It will all connect, maybe not as quickly as we would like, but it does sink in.

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