D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Sep 04, 2012 6:39 am

Hello everyone,

Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D01.

I'm going to talk to you about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, and about the classical position for holding the guitar.

Timetable for the beginner:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary when you are a beginner:
3 days when you can devote 10 minutes to repeating each difficult passage from 6 to 12 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 30 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 10 minutes practising the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases (indicated by phrase marks) several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 5 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 2 hours in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 10 and 30 minutes:
Monday 30 minutes
Tuesday 10 minutes
Wednesday 30 minutes
Thursday 10 minutes
Friday 30 minutes
Saturday 10 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.

Some classical guitarists adopt a position similar to that used by cellists. I am not competent to teach you that position, but it is worth being aware of.



We will study some techniques and some exercises.
D01, page 6 and page 7:
- The rest stoke technique (apoyando). Apoyando is a way to vibrate the string by a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to come to rest on the adjacent string.
- The technique of alternating the index and middle fingers of the hand that makes the strings vibrate. To stabilize the hand and fully benefit from this exercise, it is necessary to place the tip of the thumb on the fifth string (A string).
- The tempo. To measure yourself the time, you count the time aloud, as indicated in the score.


The rest stoke technique (apoyando)

Tirando

MI SI SOL RE

Page 6 number 1

Page 6 number 2

Page 7 SOL LA SI DO

Page 7 number 1

Page 7 number 2

Page 7 number 3





To complete this lesson we will try four simple studies, D01, page 8 to page 10,
A la claire fontaine
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune
Il est minuit
SOL LA SI RE

A la claire fontaine


RE MI SOL LA SI

Old Mac Donald


RE MI FA# SOL LA SI SI

Au clair de la lune

Il est minuit



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) : CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Anonyme : Old Mac Donald
Anonyme : Au clair de la lune




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Michael McGrath
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Pentti Kotilainen
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Win Chaivipas
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Valerie Reid
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Marian Kmet
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

brian.j.warshaw.ii
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Randy Hendrickson
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

CarlWestman
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Erik Baselier
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Peter Russell
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Alex Trujillo
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

John Friesen
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Lee Briese
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

JanAukeOost
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

James Ward
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Tuomas Saarinen
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

ChaseMasey
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Kosmas Deligkaris
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Sean Duggan
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Tom Hayes
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Gherman Shutkin
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Katherine Chu
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Nitin Nepali
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

Stefan Sreckovic
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Steven Galvin
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Ben Spurr
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

AndrewPenny
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Lucio Araujo
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

WilliamTee
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Shoaib Akhtar
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

Juergen Froehling
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Beatriz Martin
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune
:( + ♫ = :)

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Michael McGrath
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Michael McGrath » Tue Sep 04, 2012 2:35 pm

I noticed there is no mention of time signatures or explanation of note shapes; so I thought I would add a quick blurb for counting them; encase there are absolute beginners here.

Basic Notes:
(In common (4/4) time)
A whole note is worth 4 counts. A whole rest is 4 counts of silence. (Whole note left; rest right)
Image

A half note is worth two counts. A half rest is worth 2 counts of silence. (Note left, rest right)
Image

A quarter note is worth 1 count. A Quarter rest is worth 1 count of silence. (Note left; rest right)
Image

a 8th note is 1/8th of a beat; or half of a quarter note. It's rest is 1/8th a beat long. (Note left, rest right)
Image

For smaller note values than an 8th note; a additional flag is added to either the note or the rest. each additional flag signals half the count time of the next longest note. 16th notes will have two flags, 32nd notes will have 3, and so forth. It is the same for the rests.

Dotted notes Are notes that have an additional count value of one half of their value added on. A dotted half note is worth three counts, like a half and quarter note.
A dotted quarter note is worth 1 and 1/2 counts; and so forth.
Image

When the time signature changes; as explained below; sometimes the count value of these notes change also.

Clef:
There are two main clef types in use; the Treble and the bass clef.

The guitar is a Treble instrument; so uses the treble cleff; or the 'G clef'
Image

Other instruments use the base clef; or the 'F clef'
Image


The staff:
The staff has 5 lines and 4 spaces; each denoting one note.

In the Treble cleff; those notes are EFGABCDEF; in that order from bottom to top. The lines are EGBDF. A way I learned to remember this is 'Every good boy deserves fudge'. The spaces are FACE. Remember this as Face. Like your face. My face. Our face. Everyones face.

The lines that are not always on the staff are called ledger lines, and they can be above or below the normal lines. The top four lines and spaces are G (space) A (line) B(space) C (Line). The bottom three notes are D (space) C (line) B (space). I hope by now you can see the pattern, but if not here isa link to an imageshowing all the ledger lines for the treble clef



There are two ways you'll see time signatures denoted in the Delcamp texts that I have seen.

1: It will be marked as a 'C' which stands for 'Common Time'; which is 4/4 time.
2: It will be marked with a time signature of 3/4, 4/4, 3/6, etc.

The upper number is how many counts there are in each measure; while the bottom note is the note value that each count is worth.

Ex:
4/4: This means there are four counts to a mesaure; and each count is worth one quarter note. So when counting a measure with four quarter notes; it goes 1 and 2 and three and four and......

3/4: This means that there are 3 counts to a measure; and that each count is worth one quarter note. You would count as 1 and 2 and 3 and....

4/2: This means there are 4 counts to a measure, but each count is worth a half note. So instead of counting a half note as two counts (1 and two) you count it as one count now (1 and...).

--
I hope this helps; and that all the information contained above is correct. I too am a student; so make mistakes! ;)
(It also doesn't help that this was written on the fly; first thing in my morning; pre coffee!)


My videos will be posted either later today or tomorrow.

:bye:
Armed with Book, Forum, and Guitar, I will bare my teeth and face the world! Music is a way of thinking, an art. There is nothing more demanding, and nothing more rewarding.

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Marian Kmet

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marian Kmet » Tue Sep 04, 2012 5:46 pm

Jean-François Delcamp wrote: To stabilize the hand and fully benefit from this exercise, it is necessary to place the tip of the thumb on the fifth string (A string).
Is it all right to use the sixth string (E) for thumb stabilization? It feels more natural to me, especially when index/middle are playing on D string.

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Jean-François Delcamp
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Sep 04, 2012 5:52 pm

Marian Kmet wrote:Is it all right to use the sixth string (E) for thumb stabilization?
Yes Marian
:okok:
:( + ♫ = :)

Robert Goodwin

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Robert Goodwin » Tue Sep 04, 2012 8:03 pm

@Michael McGrath,

That is a very nice presentation. Counting the timing is an important part of reading music. When I start to learn a new score, I start without the guitar. I count out the timing until I have a feel for the rhythm of the music. This also lets you learn a new piece at your own pace.

To everyone,
Remember that 'rests' are real notes played silently. If you skip over the rests, the tempo of the music is thrown completely off. Guitars were originally used to accompany singing or dancing. Image how it would be to dance to music that skips a beat every so often. Very awkward.

Best regards,
Bob G.

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Michael McGrath
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Michael McGrath » Tue Sep 04, 2012 8:28 pm

Robert;

I am very glad to have been able to help out.

Last year when I joined in November I wanted to participate in the lessons; however did not have a stable enough understanding of the basics of music to be able to. I would like no one else to have to feel excluded for those same reasons! :)
Armed with Book, Forum, and Guitar, I will bare my teeth and face the world! Music is a way of thinking, an art. There is nothing more demanding, and nothing more rewarding.

Alvarez-Yari CYM-75 Masterwork

BradKemper

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by BradKemper » Wed Sep 05, 2012 12:25 am

Thanks Michael,

I am attempting to learn to read music as I go. Very informative post.

Brad

Randy Hendrickson

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Randy Hendrickson » Wed Sep 05, 2012 1:24 am

OK. Here is a dumb question. Where is the score you folks are referring to? All I see are the videos.

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Michael McGrath
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Michael McGrath » Wed Sep 05, 2012 1:26 am

Randy Hendrickson wrote:OK. Here is a dumb question. Where is the score you folks are referring to? All I see are the videos.
It's the D01 PDF from the 'Scores for Classical guitar' section of the forums.

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=7589
Armed with Book, Forum, and Guitar, I will bare my teeth and face the world! Music is a way of thinking, an art. There is nothing more demanding, and nothing more rewarding.

Alvarez-Yari CYM-75 Masterwork

Randy Hendrickson

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Randy Hendrickson » Wed Sep 05, 2012 1:31 am

Thanks Michael. Just found it. Might be nice if they posted a link to the relevant scores in the lesson. No worries. Thanks!

Marian Kmet

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marian Kmet » Wed Sep 05, 2012 6:29 am

I have another little technique question - are all the neccessary dampings always indicated in the score? Or is it neccessary to damp preceeding notes always when changing strings?

For example: (p6 excercise)
Image

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Sep 05, 2012 7:27 am

The need to damp the treble strings does depend on lot of things, such as the guitar, the strings (make and condition), the harmony of the section in question, and the effect you want to create (the articulation). Generally the 3rd string does not sustain as well as the other strings, so damping it isn't needed as often as is the case with other strings. On the other hand, if your guitar picks up sympathetic resonances easily, you may need to damp strings that weren't even played (mainly the 5th and 6th strings).

This specific exercise is played with rest stroke (apoyando), and therefore the 3rd string is damped automatically by the right hand finger playing the next note (because the finger will rest on the 3rd string in both cases). For the actual pieces and studies (etudes), I suggest you experiment and choose the way that sounds the best to you, within the limit of your abilities (using damping extensively will without exception make the piece harder to play at speed). In practice you need to always compromise between damping and playing speed. With a fast piece it will be harder to articulate the way you would ideally want to, and it will require special effort to improve your damping technique (especially the right hand). Ultimately you need to judge yourself whether damping is required in any given place.

Hope this helps! :bye:
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Marian Kmet

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marian Kmet » Wed Sep 05, 2012 8:04 am

Thank you Marko! I find your post really helpful

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GeoffB
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by GeoffB » Wed Sep 05, 2012 8:40 am

Randy Hendrickson wrote:Thanks Michael. Just found it. Might be nice if they posted a link to the relevant scores in the lesson. No worries. Thanks!
Sorry about that, Randy, it appears the link was accidentally missed from the lesson when it was updated. It is usually given. I've inserted it at the beginning of M. Delcamp's post, and will let him know.

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

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Randy Hendrickson

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Randy Hendrickson » Wed Sep 05, 2012 3:09 pm

GeoffB wrote:
Randy Hendrickson wrote:Thanks Michael. Just found it. Might be nice if they posted a link to the relevant scores in the lesson. No worries. Thanks!
Sorry about that, Randy, it appears the link was accidentally missed from the lesson when it was updated. It is usually given. I've inserted it at the beginning of M. Delcamp's post, and will let him know.

Geoff
Thanks kind sir!

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