D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Sep 12, 2012 3:33 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D03.

We are going to talk about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, about the position for holding the guitar, and finally about some techniques, exercises and pieces.



The schedule of a student in the third year:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary for players of this level :
3 days when you can devote 15 minutes to repeating each difficult passage 6 to 12 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 40 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 15 minutes practicing the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 10 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 2 hours 45 minutes in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 15 and 40 minutes:
Monday 40 minutes
Tuesday 15 minutes
Wednesday 40 minutes
Thursday 15 minutes
Friday 40 minutes
Saturday 15 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.
Finally, choose a chair of a height that allows your thigh to be horizontal, so that your guitar will be supported in a
stable manner. If your thigh is angled in one direction or the other, your guitar will slip and interfere with your playing.



To begin the course we will firstly look at, or relook at, pages 26 and 58 of volume D01.
- page 26 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 58 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) REST STROKE - APOYANDO
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stroke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. Working on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and perseverence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.

D01 p26 n1 - Delcamp Polyphonie - Apoyando


D01 p26 n2 - Delcamp Polyphonie - Apoyando


D01 p58 n15 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke


D01 p58 n16 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke




Once done, we will continue studying an exercise and 4 pieces, among the simplest in the volume D03.

- Page 86 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) STRING DAMPING
These techniques are essential in polyphonic playing. Guitar playing is unique in that we must stop the resonances, in particular those of the open strings. Without these string damping techniques, polyphony is blurred by dissonance.

D03 p86 n1 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n2 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n3 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n4 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n5 - STRING DAMPING




- Page 8 Giorgio MAINERIO (1535-1582) SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA
This piece is a passemeze that uses two chords, those of A minor and G major. GWIN AR C'HALLAOUED in volume D03 is based on the same chords. Also in volume D03, BRIAN BORU'S MARCH is similarly based on these two chords.
The bass accompaniment is so simple and functional that I recommend it as a model for anyone who wants to begin working on improvisation.
To start work on improvisation, play the following bass part :
| A E | A E | A E | A E | G D | A E | G D | A E |
and use your free fingers to improvise over a melody over it.
First improvise a melody over the bass made up of whole notes (semibreves). When you've mastered the improvisation of a melody composed of whole notes, start using quarter notes (crotchets), which is more difficult. Finally improvise over the bass a melody made up of whole notes, quarter notes and eighth notes (quavers). We will not go any further in this third year course.

D03 p8 Giorgio MAINERIO - Schiarazula marazula


D03 p8 Improvisation 1 - Passemeze


D03 p8 Improvisation 2 - Passemeze


D03 p8 Improvisation 3 - Passemeze




- Page 9 Guillaume MORLAYE (1510?-1558?) GAILLARDE
Here William Morlaye constantly plays on the ambivalence in the pattern of accented beats. The rhythm is based at the same time on two measures in 3/8 time (ie 2 strong beats for a total of 6 eighth notes) and also on one long measure in 3/4 time (ie 3 strong beats for a total of 6 eighth notes). This practice, already common in the Renaissance, has been in constant use by composers right up to our own time. These changes in the rhythm are called hemiola. A hemiola refers to the insertion of a triple rhythm into a duple rhythm, or vice versa.

D03 p9 Guillaume MORLAYE - Gaillarde




- Page 45 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ARPEGGI
Two simple pieces, perfect for an introduction to arpeggios. In these arpeggios, only your fingers move, be sure to keep your right hand in the same position.

D03 p45 Ferdinand CARULLI - Arpeggi di 3 note


D03 p45 Ferdinand CARULLI - Arpeggi di 4 note




- page 63 Mattéo CARCASSI (1792-1853) ANDANTINO opus 59
This andantino is a small masterpiece of brevity. For my part, I damp the resonance of the bass strings and I suggest you do the same. To damp the resonances, I rest my thumb on the string when I play with the index finger and I rest my index finger on the string when I play with the thumb, as in this video example.

D03 p63 exercice andantino


D03 p63 Mattéo CARCASSI -andantino opus 59




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 26 du volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 45 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ARPEGGI
- page 8 Giorgio MAINERIO (1535-1582) SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA



Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

håvard.bergene
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Robert Goodwin
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Mike Modjeski
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Penelope Phillips-Armand
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

RossStep
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Vincent_Pera
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Isagani Lastra
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA
:( + ♫ = :)

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Giuseppe Gasparini
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Wed Sep 12, 2012 6:21 am

Greetings to all participants DO3 :casque: :discussion: :bye:

Mike Modjeski

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Modjeski » Wed Sep 12, 2012 11:05 pm

Greetings to you as well Giuseppe, and to all D03 students!

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Goran Penic
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Goran Penic » Wed Sep 12, 2012 11:59 pm

Good luck, and even more pleasure with D03 to all my last year classmates.
:bye:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Robert Goodwin

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Robert Goodwin » Fri Sep 14, 2012 10:52 am

Greeting D03,
I'm glad to see you are back for D03 Mike.

Giuseppe, It's nice to see you once again encouraging us less skilled players. I have tried to take your advice about holding the guitar close to the chest but my tummy gets in the way (old guy.) This causes the guitar to rotate upward. My hands are on the small side and the rotation forces me to bend my wrist to reach around to the front of the neck. This in turn causes my wrist to become sore. I think I have reached a compromise by leaning forward although it makes my left arm feel a little cramped up. I am still experimenting with posture but I already see the advantage of supporting the guitar with the chest. I realize now that I was actually holding the guitar up with my left thumb. By the of every practice, the large joint on my left thumb was sore. This has eased that strain.

Goran, thanks for the encouragement and I hope we will be hearing you play again this year.

By the end of D02 I thought I was getting pretty good and then I hit SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA. :lol: Such a simple sounding song and such a monster to play.

I think I spent about an hour getting to a point where I could play the first two bars. Play it, not necessarily musically. I'm sure the seemingly odd righthand fingering will help me get past the basic i-m-i-m habit but adding in the damping had my right hand very confused for a while.

On the other hand, the arpegio's are lovely and a genuine pleasure to play.

Best regards,
Bob G.

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Goran Penic
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Goran Penic » Fri Sep 14, 2012 12:47 pm

Bob,
last year i post this as an example of right hand finfering for (in my opinion) most complex part of SCHIARAZULA. It may be useful.

Happy birthday dear friend :ivresse:
:bye:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

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Giuseppe Gasparini
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Fri Sep 14, 2012 4:40 pm

Happy birthday Robert :ivresse: :ivresse: :guitare: :bye:

Robert Goodwin

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Robert Goodwin » Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:08 am

Thank you my friends for your kind regards :merci:

Mike Modjeski

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Modjeski » Sun Sep 16, 2012 11:56 pm

Happy Belated Bob!

I have a question about D03 pg. 86 ex. #5
It appears in the signature that B is flat, and I see that the first B has a natural sign canceling the flat, but why is there a natural sign, (in parenthesis) in front of the following C note?

James Williams

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by James Williams » Mon Sep 17, 2012 12:31 am

It's possible to mis-interpret the C as a C#, which would act as a leading tone into the D, such as in the second to last measure. The natural sign would help prevent this.

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Goran Penic
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Goran Penic » Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:51 pm

I guess that's part taken from a larger composition, in which the earlier note C was #C, so here is an indication that at this point C should be played without flat.
Or is this just a reminder for exercise (first position playing with 2nd finger) since it is later note C playing as # C (second position and 2nd finger)
:bye:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Håvard.Bergene
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Wed Sep 19, 2012 5:26 am

Hi, all. It is good to get started. I'll try to keep the schedule and post my recordings after one week of practice. So here we go.

This is my POLYPHONIE - Apoyando, SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA, ARPEGGI + GAILLARDE (I actually recorded the Andantino as well, or so I thought. The harddrive on my Canon HG10 is filled by D01 and D02 :)

[media]https://youtu.be/9GiS38FaCLg[/media]
Alhambra 11P

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Giuseppe Gasparini
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Giuseppe Gasparini » Wed Sep 19, 2012 7:52 am

Hi håvard Bravo :bravo: , a lot of work is not easy, you should go slower but accurate, not to train the errors :chaud: , the speed will :wink: :discussion: :bye:

PS.scusatemi for my English

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Sep 19, 2012 10:28 am

Håvard, I think you would do well to work on your tone. I understand that your other hobbies can make maintaining your nails in good condition a challenge, which is understandable. But you also seem to have a tendency (also based on your earlier videos I watched) to pull the strings outwards from the soundboard when doing free strokes, which makes the sound not only thin, but also easily creates a "slap" effect when the strings hit the frets. You should concentrate on aiming the stroke inwards and up, so that you just miss the adjacent string. I also spotted some pitch variations on some notes, which indicate that you may use too much force with your left hand fingers, causing a string to tighten / loosen momentarily. Overall I think that a lighter touch would produce better results, or alternatively higher tension strings.

Your timing (rhythm) is very accurate, and you switch your right hand playing position effortlessly. Obviously Schiarazula (deceivingly hard piece) and Gaillarde will require more work to get fluent, but overall I think you're doing very good after one week! Let me also use this opportunity to say that I watched your "recital" from summer, and thought it was very impressive playing!

I understand that you're planning to take both D03 + D04 this year. Good luck with that, and I hope you'll find the time to do them both properly!
Alhambra 4P spruce
Almansa 457 cedar
Cordoba C12 spruce

Håvard.Bergene
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Wed Sep 19, 2012 11:32 am

:merci: Marko for you thorough commenting. This is going to be a great year. I know I tend to use to much force with my left. Aiming for lighter pressure closer to the frets:-) I'll check my right hand.

:merci: Giuseppe. I guess I have too little patience, but I often try to learn the whole piece as fast as possible at medium+ speed. Then I try to slow down on the difficult parts to figure out the right technique. My experience using this approach is that I often play errors at random places.

I'll try to post some new recordings before lesson 2 starts, so I'll maintain this lesson while working on D04.
Alhambra 11P

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