D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:30 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- pages 118 Delcamp, Jean-François Scales n°27 and 28
For n° 28, try to find the best compromise between playing without any finger noise and playing legato. Bars 4, 5 and 6 don't present this type of difficulty, as the fingers can slide along the nylon strings without any noise.





Finally we'll look at 3 pieces.
- page 25 Anonyme, Oscar Chilesotti Se io m'accorgo ben
As in scale n°28, the main difficulty is to achieve legato playing. For the dynamics, start the first bar with a crescendo, then in the second bar play a decrescendo. Then continue using crescendo and decrescendo to match the melody. When the melody goes up, play a crescendo. When it goes down, play a decrescendo.



- page 82, 83 Strauss, Johann Lockvögel, valse opus 118
After the forte in the first two beats (which gets the attention of the listener), Johann Strauss uses the piano dynamic to maintain and sharpen the listener's attention. The valse (waltz) gets into its true rhythm from bar 4. From this bar onwards the rest of the piece has a 4-bar phrase structure.



- page 96, 97 Anonyme Mi Favorita
The first 3 bars are an introduction which serves to establish the rhythm and key of the piece. The (soft) accompaniment makes its entry in bar 4. The accompaniment is on its own from the first beat of bar 4 to the second beat of bar 5, in order to create a sense of expectation which will heighten the receptivity of the listener and prepare him for the imminent arrival of the melody. I advise you to play these two bars of accompaniment with a metronome. That will allow the melody (which starts with an upbeat at the end of bar 5) to display a free quality (a rubato) which will appear to have all the more character for having followed on from the strictness of bars 4 and 5. The contrast between strict rhythm and free rhythm will give savour and character to the beginning of this mazurka. Later there are many repetitions (bars 10-11, bars 14-15); vary the articulation (legato, staccato) and vary the tone colour (over the soundhole, towards the bridge, towards the neck).
After that, nothing else of significance happens, except for the modulation into G major.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 82, 83 Strauss, Johann Lockvögel, valse opus 118
- page 96, 97 Anonyme Mi Favorita


Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

valse opus 118
Mi Favorita

ChrisCapener
valse opus 118
Mi Favorita

Stewart Doyle
valse opus 118
Mi Favorita

LindaWoodford
valse opus 118
Mi Favorita

Pentti Kotilainen
valse opus 118
Mi Favorita
:( + ♫ = :)

ChrisCapener

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by ChrisCapener » Sat Mar 08, 2014 4:40 am

Hi Guys,

Look at this I am the first to post in this lesson :D Ok probably because it's a half baked pie, but it does show at least that I have been trying to play it !! :lol:

[media]https://youtu.be/B8GZX61I-Ts[/media]

Have fun :bye:

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by LindaWoodford » Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:22 am

:bye: Chris :bravo: that was a great start, especially after just 1 week of practice.

There are three things I might suggest paying attention to as you continue to work on it:

1. The waltz rhythm should (I think) come almost totally from differing emphasis, rather than pausing after the first of each 3 notes, as you are tending to do, particularly in the first half. Sure, the 3 chords in bar 4 can be played more slowly, to build anticipation, but after then, look out for the accents (>) and try to keep the tempo even.

2. You are missing quite a few extra slurs in the second half by playing the notes straight. I'm not sure if you are doing this purposefully as an initial step, but in any case you seem to have reached a stage where you could start adding them in. When you do add them in, make sure you give each note equal duration - it's easy to get this wrong with slurs.

3. Finally, well done for following the bass damping in the first half, but I wonder if it would sound better if you damped the bass E or A after playing the next note, rather than before it. It takes some effort to train the thumb to do this in between the two repeated notes, but it makes for a smoother sound.

Actually I have a question on the damping: are you damping the trebles on the third beat of each bar in the first half? There is a rest shown, and it would make for a crisper rhythm, but it takes additional effort, and at my current tempo, it makes no difference, because my strings have stopped ringing by then anyway :oops: I kind of want to know if you think it would be important to damp these notes at higher speeds, because I want to train my fingers correctly from the start.

Maybe I'll also try and record an initial version this weekend.

One other thing I've noticed - it is a very weird feeling to play Mi Favorita directly after Lockvögel, because after playing all those slurs, it takes some readjustment to play each note with the right hand. There is almost an expectation that half of them will just play by themselves!
Regards, Linda

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:07 am

LindaWoodford wrote:Actually I have a question on the damping: are you damping the trebles on the third beat of each bar in the first half? There is a rest shown, and it would make for a crisper rhythm, but it takes additional effort, and at my current tempo, it makes no difference, because my strings have stopped ringing by then anyway :oops: I kind of want to know if you think it would be important to damp these notes at higher speeds, because I want to train my fingers correctly from the start.
For what it's worth, professor Delcamp does not seem to damp the chords on the third beats. It's also interesting that I would damp the bass note with thumb after playing the chord, then hurry back to play the single note on 4th string with thumb, so that the 4th string note gets played with thumb both times in a bar. But professor Delcamp plays the 4th string note on beat 3 with his index finger, so his whole hand moves one string towards the bass side for the duration of beat 3 and then back towards the treble side of strings just in time for beat 1. In essence his playing hand is making a waltz of its own :D
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by LindaWoodford » Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:15 pm

professor Delcamp plays the 4th string note on beat 3 with his index finger
Gosh you are right! I hadn't noticed that before. I saw that he was clearly damping the bass with his thumb, but I have so far been doing it the same way you did, which is quite awkward, or at least needs an agile thumb :wink:

:merci:

PS I enjoyed listening to your lesson 8 recordings this morning. It really didn't matter at all that they weren't 100% clean (and I hope it didn't go dark whilst you were chasing that elusive goal!) The pieces are pretty long, so unless someone is playing at a level well below their capabilities, or had practiced them to performance standard, it would take a certain amount of luck to get through them without making any errors at all. (I probably need to tell myself this too!)
Regards, Linda

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sat Mar 08, 2014 2:17 pm

Thank you, Linda!
LindaWoodford wrote:(and I hope it didn't go dark whilst you were chasing that elusive goal!) The pieces are pretty long, so unless someone is playing at a level well below their capabilities, or had practiced them to performance standard, it would take a certain amount of luck to get through them without making any errors at all. (I probably need to tell myself this too!)
:lol: What I do nowadays is to record one piece of a time. Once I got a take I'm satisfied with, I take the memory card out of the recorder, process the video (at the same time making sure there are no technical glitches, other than heads or other body parts cut out of the frame), then start uploading to youtube which can take between 20min and 1 hour for a piece with video shot in 1080p), and go back to practice and record the next one. It serves as a playing break at the same time. So it got dark during that break :) Speaking of playing break, I've had one for the whole day today, so I better get some practicing done.

Regarding making errors, I noticed not so long time ago, that there are errors in professor Delcamp's playing as well. He may sometimes miss a bass note or something like that, and I didn't even notice it before! Just goes to show that they always put some extra notes into the pieces to be missed without anyone noticing. And also that to play without errors, you not only need to play pieces well below your capabilities but also to practice them to performance standard. :bye:
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by LindaWoodford » Sat Mar 08, 2014 6:43 pm

there are errors in professor Delcamp's playing as well
:shock: :shock: Surely not! :wink:
Just goes to show that they always put some extra notes into the pieces to be missed without anyone noticing
:lol: :lol: :lol: I like that!

BTW, I've just been trying out the 'first finger for the third beat' method, and it really is so much easier than using the 'thumb back and forth' method. Even though I've been practicing the thumb method all week, it was no problem to switch. Thanks so much for pointing this out, Marko.
Regards, Linda

ChrisCapener

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by ChrisCapener » Sun Mar 09, 2014 5:30 am

Well spotted Marko and thanks for the advice, now I can see that playing the fourth string with the index finger while damping with the thumb at that stage also prepares the thumb for the next repeated bar.

Linda on the slurs, I dn't really know how to read the music here, how should I be playing this for example, can you help me out?

Rgds

Chris
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sun Mar 09, 2014 7:07 am

Chris, remember the mordents & trills exercise from last year's lesson number 6?

You play that by fretting c# on the 2nd string with your 2nd finger, pluck the note, then immediately do a hammer-on followed by a pull-off with your 3rd finger. The combined duration of those three notes is one beat (quarter note), which is why those two notes are printed in small font. You could also think of it as the first two notes having a duration of 1/16 each, and the last note 1/8.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by ChrisCapener » Sun Mar 09, 2014 7:57 am

:merci: Marko

Great thanks very much, when it is coupled with a bass note do you play the bass note with the first 1/16th, or the last 1/8th??

Chris

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:00 am

With the first 1/16th.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by LindaWoodford » Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:07 am

Hi Chris, just a short note in case Marko's very good explanation above seemed in conflict with my earlier tip to keep the note durations equal. I completely agree with the timing that Marko describes, and the 'equal duration' tip was aimed at the regular slurred notes that follow directly afterwards. Sorry if I caused any confusion.

Sounds like it is all clear now, anyway :bye:
Regards, Linda

ChrisCapener

Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by ChrisCapener » Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:47 am

Marko, Linda,

Been trying this , I think the bass note is on the commencement of the slur but not too strong so as not to 'drown it', with this exercise I see why I must get my thumb behind the neck, because of the 4th finger hammer ons, they have no power if my thumb is above the back of the neck .


Chris

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sun Mar 09, 2014 10:41 am

Linda, I've done some reading in the forum (again!), re-watched some of your videos from the previous lesson, and I've got some new exciting theories regarding your right hand! :lol:

1. What I found out was something called 'Quadrige Phenomenon' (although I believe outside Delcamp it is called 'Quadriga Phenomenon'. The way it relates to right hand is that it is difficult to flex the 'm' finger from the middle joint when the 'a' finger is extended. You can test this by wiggling your m finger from the middle joint with both a finger extended and flexed. This also applies to big knuckle joints, but to lesser degree.

2. When you tilt your right hand to the right, as you have tendency to do, this lessens the need to extend your a finger past the m finger.

3. Watching the videos from the last lesson I noticed that in your rest strokes you mostly use the flexing of the fingers from the knuckle joint to play the string, as you should, but with free strokes you switch to flexing the fingers around the middle joint, and the segments between your middle joint and big joints actually lift upwards (or away from the soundboard), which means that you are extending at the big joint instead of flexing. This is especially noticeable in Maria Luisa middle voice chords, but can be seen in the other videos as well when you're using free stroke. To my understanding the correct free stroke movement should be just like rest stroke (although the fingers will be more flexed around the middle joint to begin with), with the exception that you need to flex around the middle joint and tip joint immediately after the release so that you'll miss the next string, then extend from the knuckle joint to get the finger.

Combine these three things, and we know why have a tendency to tilt you hand, and the fix, I believe, is to change your free stroke technique so that you concentrate on making the fist from the big knuckles.

I uploaded a short clip into youtube where I try to demonstrate the difference. I first play few block chords using mainly middle joints, and then move to using big knuckles. My nails are a bit overgrown, so there are a few tone issues, but you should be able hear how the tone changes as well when the stroke comes from the big knuckle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j97CcX-OHCE
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by LindaWoodford » Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:00 pm

Gosh, thanks Marko. I've watched your video, and then looked again at mine and see what you mean. I don't quite understand the link with the tendency for me to lean the RH to the right*, but at least I can start working on ensuring the 'pendulum' swing comes from the large knuckle for free strokes. That's quite important to correct.

:merci: very much :!:

*what I think you mean is that leaning my hand to the right allows the middle joint to bend, but I am doing this too much, so, leaning the hand to the right is allowing me to play incorrectly... Is that what you meant?
Regards, Linda

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