Students' Corner

The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.
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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
Sheldon Kawonga
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Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:10 pm

Re: Students' Corner

Post by Sheldon Kawonga » Wed Oct 31, 2018 5:49 pm

Hi, I would like to be registered for D01 lessons. I've already made a request for username change to include my surname. I fully intend on going through lessons 1 and 2. Do I need to still post videos of recordings for those lessons, though?

Colin Bullock
Moderator
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Colin Bullock » Fri Nov 02, 2018 7:45 am

Sheldon Kawonga wrote:
Wed Oct 31, 2018 5:49 pm
Hi, I would like to be registered for D01 lessons. I've already made a request for username change to include my surname. I fully intend on going through lessons 1 and 2. Do I need to still post videos of recordings for those lessons, though?
Hi Sheldon
If you are just going to go through the lessons on your own you don’t need to be registered, and don’t need to post videos or participate in the discussions.

if you do want to participate in the discussions and take part in the end of yr exam, then you will need to post videos and fulfill the other requirements of registration:
Eg advertise the course, regularly discuss/comment on other students videos etc.

Let us know what you intend to do
Regards
Colin

Sheldon Kawonga
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2018 1:10 pm

Re: Students' Corner

Post by Sheldon Kawonga » Tue Nov 06, 2018 8:31 pm

I'll prefer to just go through it on my own. So I will have access to everything for D01 without registering?

William Byrd
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:42 am
Location: Tokyo, Japan

Re: Students' Corner

Post by William Byrd » Wed Nov 14, 2018 9:28 pm

Could someone please help me with an explaination of how to read this. I’m unclear on exactly what the Roman numerals at the top mean as well as the numbers in the circles at the bottom of the staff. I am assuming the numbers above the notes refer to the correct fingering. Any assistance would be appreciated.

Image
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1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
1978 Masaru Matano
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

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LarryShone
Student of the online lessons
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2014 12:39 pm
Location: Darlington, England

Re: Students' Corner

Post by LarryShone » Wed Nov 14, 2018 9:31 pm

They look like chord progressions!
Surround yourself with people dear James, they are easier to fight for than principles.
José Ferrer Estudiante 5208A
Fender DG 5 acoustic
Tanglewood DBLT SFCE electro-acoustic
Tanglewood TU 13M concert ukulele
Brunswick Baritone ukulele
Deacon Mandolin

William Byrd
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:42 am
Location: Tokyo, Japan

Re: Students' Corner

Post by William Byrd » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:04 pm

LarryShone wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 9:31 pm
They look like chord progressions!
Indeed. I'm trying to understand the notation for the shifts.
1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
1978 Masaru Matano
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

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LarryShone
Student of the online lessons
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2014 12:39 pm
Location: Darlington, England

Re: Students' Corner

Post by LarryShone » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:09 pm

Where is the music from?
Surround yourself with people dear James, they are easier to fight for than principles.
José Ferrer Estudiante 5208A
Fender DG 5 acoustic
Tanglewood DBLT SFCE electro-acoustic
Tanglewood TU 13M concert ukulele
Brunswick Baritone ukulele
Deacon Mandolin

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Rick Beauregard
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Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:23 am
Location: Blaine, WA

Re: Students' Corner

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:41 am

The Roman numerals are fret positions/shifts and the numbers in circles indicate on which string to play the note, when the choice is not obvious.

Sometimes Roman numerals are used to indicate barres of that fret, but I don’t think that is the case here.

Fret positions are not normally shown in scores of pieces. But this study has then shown to help you see the shifts. The position shifts denote which frets your LH fingers would normally play. So for example, in 1st position (I) the first finger is assigned to the first fret, second on the second fret etc. In position VIII, 1 is assigned to the 8th fret, 2 at 9, 3 at 10, 4 at 11th fret.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

William Byrd
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:42 am
Location: Tokyo, Japan

Re: Students' Corner

Post by William Byrd » Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:46 am

William Byrd wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 9:28 pm
Could someone please help me with an explaination of how to read this. I’m unclear on exactly what the Roman numerals at the top mean as well as the numbers in the circles at the bottom of the staff. I am assuming the numbers above the notes refer to the correct fingering. Any assistance would be appreciated.

Image
I figured it out. Roman numerals are the position and the numbers within the circle denote the string.
1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
1978 Masaru Matano
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

William Byrd
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:42 am
Location: Tokyo, Japan

Re: Students' Corner

Post by William Byrd » Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:47 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:41 am
The Roman numerals are fret positions/shifts and the numbers in circles indicate on which string to play the note, when the choice is not obvious.

Sometimes Roman numerals are used to indicate barres of that fret, but I don’t think that is the case here.

Fret positions are not normally shown in scores of pieces. But this study has then shown to help you see the shifts. The position shifts denote which frets your LH fingers would normally play. So for example, in 1st position (I) the first finger is assigned to the first fret, second on the second fret etc. In position VIII, 1 is assigned to the 8th fret, 2 at 9, 3 at 10, 4 at 11th fret.
Thanks Rick. I must have just missed your post while I was replying to my own post.
1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
1978 Masaru Matano
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

User avatar
Rick Beauregard
Student tutor
Posts: 1407
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:23 am
Location: Blaine, WA

Re: Students' Corner

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Nov 15, 2018 5:53 pm

William Byrd wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:47 am
Rick Beauregard wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 2:41 am
The Roman numerals are fret positions/shifts and the numbers in circles indicate on which string to play the note, when the choice is not obvious.

Sometimes Roman numerals are used to indicate barres of that fret, but I don’t think that is the case here.

Fret positions are not normally shown in scores of pieces. But this study has then shown to help you see the shifts. The position shifts denote which frets your LH fingers would normally play. So for example, in 1st position (I) the first finger is assigned to the first fret, second on the second fret etc. In position VIII, 1 is assigned to the 8th fret, 2 at 9, 3 at 10, 4 at 11th fret.
Thanks Rick. I must have just missed your post while I was replying to my own post.
Ain’t it great to figure out stuff on you own?
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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GeoffB
Chief moderator
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by GeoffB » Sat Dec 08, 2018 5:11 pm

To all students:

You will have noticed that lesson moderator John Montes has not been around since the beginning of this session. I have received an email from him and am glad to say he is OK, but he has needed to concentrate on a number of challenging matters which involved a great deal of travelling and have taken up a lot of his time. He hopes to be able to return to the forum when the situation is more settled. Meanwhile he sends his apologies for his absence and his sincere and heart-felt regards to students and the community.

My thanks to Colin for shouldering the duties of student enquiries and registration single-handed for the past few months, and I hope we shall see John back before too long.
Classical Guitar Forum.

"Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it." - Steven Wright

William Byrd
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:42 am
Location: Tokyo, Japan

Rest Stroke

Post by William Byrd » Sun Dec 16, 2018 12:01 am

A question regarding rest stroke. When performing rest stroke with the I and M fingers, is it recommended to rest the thumb on the 5th or 6th siring or to keep it in the air, not in contact with a bass string?
1959 Sakazo Nakade
1962 Mitsuru Tamura
1973 Ryoji Matsuoka No 40
1978 Masaru Matano
2010 Hiroshi Komori No 35

User avatar
Rick Beauregard
Student tutor
Posts: 1407
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:23 am
Location: Blaine, WA

Re: Students' Corner

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Dec 16, 2018 1:32 am

When practicing at first resting your thumb is helpful to keep your fingers oriented in correct position. Eventually you’ll develop the spatial sense to keep your fingers in position without resting the thumb.
Last edited by Rick Beauregard on Sun Dec 16, 2018 1:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Ken Kim
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 125
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:27 pm
Location: Schererville, IN

Re: Rest Stroke

Post by Ken Kim » Sun Dec 16, 2018 1:39 am

William Byrd wrote:
Sun Dec 16, 2018 12:01 am
A question regarding rest stroke. When performing rest stroke with the I and M fingers, is it recommended to rest the thumb on the 5th or 6th siring or to keep it in the air, not in contact with a bass string?
Hi, William.
There are couple good reasons to rest your thumb on 5th or 6th string.
You will have better stroke and tone because your RH position become steady with thumb on string.

You will be introduced thumb damping for bass note at 5th lesson. If you make thumb rest on string as a habit, thumb damping would be easier. It is quite beneficial for your steady RH position.

Might not be good enough to give you advice at my level, but I surely try to rest my thumb on bass strings.
Ken

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