D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Sep 17, 2014 7:24 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D01.

I'm going to talk to you about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, and about the classical position for holding the guitar.

Timetable for the beginner:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary when you are a beginner:
3 days when you can devote 10 minutes to repeating each difficult passage from 6 to 12 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 30 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 10 minutes practising the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases (indicated by phrase marks) several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 5 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 2 hours in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 10 and 30 minutes:
Monday 30 minutes
Tuesday 10 minutes
Wednesday 30 minutes
Thursday 10 minutes
Friday 30 minutes
Saturday 10 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.

Some classical guitarists adopt a position similar to that used by cellists. I am not competent to teach you that position, but it is worth being aware of.



We will study some techniques and some exercises.
D01, page 6 and page 7:
- The rest stoke technique (apoyando). Apoyando is a way to vibrate the string by a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to come to rest on the adjacent string.
- The technique of alternating the index and middle fingers of the hand that makes the strings vibrate. To stabilize the hand and fully benefit from this exercise, it is necessary to place the tip of the thumb on the fifth string (A string).
- The tempo. To measure yourself the time, you count the time aloud, as indicated in the score.


The rest stoke technique (apoyando)

Tirando

MI SI SOL RE

Page 6 number 1

Page 6 number 2

Page 7 SOL LA SI DO

Page 7 number 1

Page 7 number 2

Page 7 number 3





To complete this lesson we will try four simple studies, D01, page 8 to page 10,
A la claire fontaine
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune
Il est minuit
SOL LA SI RE

A la claire fontaine


RE MI SOL LA SI

Old Mac Donald


RE MI FA# SOL LA SI SI

Au clair de la lune

Il est minuit



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) : CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Anonyme : Old Mac Donald
Anonyme : Au clair de la lune




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune


Martin Adrian
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Jesse Knapp
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Paul Ashley
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Brandon Birse
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Kushtrim Avdiu
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Jeremy Gillard
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Zafar Haq
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Jay Gutknecht
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Sasa Durakovic
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Ivan Hurtado
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Claude Huddy
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Tom Richmond
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Rajesh Dhungel
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Steven Galvin
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Madeleine Pashkofsky
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

John Hughes
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Mikko Helenius
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Bert Stendahl
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Ernesto Santiago
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

Zhihao Wang
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Sandynho Rodriguez
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Alex Lototskyy
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Joseph Gontarek
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

Chu Bun
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Colin Bullock
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Loo Kin Xing
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Haris Karachristianidis
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Agnel Joseph Noojibalthila
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Warley Lima
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune

Jose Ramon Martinez
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune
:( + ♫ = :)

Martin Adrian

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Martin Adrian » Wed Sep 17, 2014 9:18 am

CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING.mp3
Old Mac Donald
Old Mac Donald.mp3
Au clair de la lune
AU CLAIR DE LA LUNE.mp3
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Zafar Haq
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Zafar Haq » Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:04 am

Hi, Martin Adrian,
Very good start.
Pleasant listening to my ears.
Smooth flow in playing, shows your practice and confidence.
I just downloaded the D01 pdf to begin my practice.

Håvard.Bergene
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:13 am

:bravo: Martin. Very nice playing. Sounds like you managed the rest-strokes well, and you kept the rhythm at good speed. If you can manage to make video it will be easier to judge the rest-strokes and damping. I think maybe you don't damp the A after measure 5 (which is not indicated in the score, but will occur naturally if you follow the indicated fingering (switching the 2nd finger from A at 3rd string to E at 4th string)) Also in the picture it seems that you are holding the guitar too much horizontal (the guitar body too high). The wrist on your left hand looks ok, but the right hand wrist is bent, and it does not look comfortable to have the right arm raised that high. Maybe your guitar support is too high?

Best wishes, Håvard (former D01-D05 student, now D06 at the spanish forum)
Alhambra 11P

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Goran Penic
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Goran Penic » Wed Sep 17, 2014 11:32 am

:bravo: Martin
Håvard.Bergene wrote::bravo: Martin....
Also in the picture it seems that you are holding the guitar too much horizontal (the guitar body too high). The wrist on your left hand looks ok, but the right hand wrist is bent, and it does not look comfortable to have the right arm raised that high. Maybe your guitar support is too high? ...
I agree with Håvard. Perhaps it is better to initially play without guitar support to obtain a better feel and found the right position. After that you can use guitar support and and adapt it to your needs.
:bye:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Shelby Brown

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Shelby Brown » Wed Sep 17, 2014 5:21 pm

:bravo: Martin!!

Everything sounds good. I would have to agree, looking at your picture, it appears your guitar may be sitting to high on your knee. Not sure about the ergonomics of this, but it might impact your playing in the future. A video would be great if you can produce one, better to see your technique.

Again....great playing!

Shelby

Jay Gutknecht

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jay Gutknecht » Wed Sep 17, 2014 5:38 pm

Very nice smooth playing. I also agree that the body of the guitar looks to high which makes you bend your wrist so much can't be very comfortable.

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Jeremy Gillard
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jeremy Gillard » Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:55 pm

Martin Adrian:

The only thing I would add so far is to work on your muting. The reason for muting notes is so that a preceding note does not keep sounding over-top of the following melody notes. Judging by your photo that you posted, I would also add that it may be beneficial to have the lower bout of the guitar to be lower. This will allow your right arm to approach the guitar strings at a better angle. From the photo, your wrist does not look comfortable on your right hand. Keep up the good work.
It's the player, not the guitar...
But, the guitar helps!!!

PaulAshley

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by PaulAshley » Thu Sep 18, 2014 12:51 am

Th longest journey starts with the first step and boy, do I have a short one here - a question about notation.

What does the /2 or /m next to the damping symbol indicate? Is it the finger used to damp? The string? If it indicates the finger, it would see that the notation is vacillating between 1234 and p i m a.

Image

Shelby Brown

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Shelby Brown » Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:02 am

PaulAshley wrote:Th longest journey starts with the first step and boy, do I have a short one here - a question about notation.

What does the /2 or /m next to the damping symbol indicate? Is it the finger used to damp? The string? If it indicates the finger, it would see that the notation is vacillating between 1234 and p i m a.

Image
Hi Paul,

It does indicate what finger to use in damping the previous note.

Shelby :casque:

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CarlWestman
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:07 am

PaulAshley wrote:Th longest journey starts with the first step and boy, do I have a short one here - a question about notation.

What does the /2 or /m next to the damping symbol indicate? Is it the finger used to damp? The string? If it indicates the finger, it would see that the notation is vacillating between 1234 and p i m a.

Image
IIRC, the 1234 refers to fingers of the fretting hand, and p i m a refers to fingers of the playing hand. Sometimes it is easier to dampen a note with the fingers of one hand, sometimes it is easier to do it with the other. The particular hand and finger to use is thus suggested by the notation. The important thing is that the prior note be dampened.

PaulAshley

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by PaulAshley » Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:36 am

CarlWestman wrote:
PaulAshley wrote:... IIRC, the 1234 refers to fingers of the fretting hand, and p i m a refers to fingers of the playing hand. Sometimes it is easier to dampen a note with the fingers of one hand, sometimes it is easier to do it with the other. The particular hand and finger to use is thus suggested by the notation. The important thing is that the prior note be dampened.
That makes sense now. Regarding damping, is all that's necessary a light touch of the finger to the string? If so, since the resonance of the top will still carry the previous note, is the objective just to shorten the length and soften the volume of that previous note?

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CarlWestman
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by CarlWestman » Thu Sep 18, 2014 3:41 am

Light to moderate pressure should do it. You bring up an interesting question, though, about the vibrating top carrying the note. However, since the vibration of the top is caused by the vibrating string, presumably by stopping the vibrating string you should go a long way toward stopping the vibrating top. You could test this with a bold strum of an open E chord, say, then touch (dampen) all the strings without touching the top. I think you'll find the sound stops so quickly that any continuation of sound by the top is so faint as to be negligible.

John Daily

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by John Daily » Thu Sep 18, 2014 12:34 pm

@Martin: It's not easy to be the first one, so bravo for putting yourself out there! You have a lot of great comments on your submissions already, so I'll just add a couple of things. First, your timing is impeccable...nice and even with confidence and no hesitation. The second thing is that your attack seems to be a bit hard. This could be due to the actual force you're using, or even your nail shape, but I believe it's what's causing the slight buzzing sound you're getting from lower strings (for example, the open 'G' in the Cordes A Vide. Just something to be aware of going forward. Great job!!

PaulAshley

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by PaulAshley » Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:39 pm

CarlWestman wrote:...You could test this with a bold strum of an open E chord, say, then touch (dampen) all the strings without touching the top. I think you'll find the sound stops so quickly that any continuation of sound by the top is so faint as to be negligible.
It does indeed stop substantially with the lower strings, but not with the G B and E. Perhaps my guitar is too resonant!

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