D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Oct 08, 2014 8:49 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D02.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.

Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 72 ex. 1, 2 & 3.
In these right hand exercises, you will work on getting a smooth join between notes, that is to say that you will end one or more notes at the exact moment that you start the following note (or notes).





- page 84 ex. 37 to 41.
Exercises 37 to 40 are for the fingers of the right hand. The (x) sign indicates that the right hand finger is resting on the string (and damping it). Exercise 41 is for the left hand: lean the left hand finger over to damp the adjacent string at the same time as you play the new note.




- page 73 exercise 6.
Play this left-hand exercise trying to leave your fingers in place on the strings as long as you can, as I show you in the following video. If the stretches between your fingers feel too much for you, you can make it easier for the left hand by using a capo so that you play on the higher frets which are closer together and your fingers will not have to stretch so far apart. Avoid bending your left wrist, as this not only hurts, but also hinders the mobility of your fingers. Aim for the position (of the guitar neck, your elbow and your shoulder) which will allow you to play without bending your left wrist, as shown in the following video. You will be able to play this exercise more effectively if you place your left thumb below your ring finger, i.e. below the third fret.


- page 74 Chromatic scale
Play this scale trying to leave your fingers on the strings as long as possible, as shown in this video. You will be able to play this exercise more effectively if you place your left thumb below your ring finger, i.e. below the third fret.





Next, we will be working on two pieces with a phrase structure of 4 bars. Phrase structure is the division of the larger musical phrase into parts of equal length, with the most common division being into sections of 4 bars. This division is linked not only to walking, but also to dance, poetry and singing.



- page 9 Fernando SOR (1778-1839) LEÇON IV opus 60
In order to mark the beat yourself, you need to count the smallest rhythmic values out loud as you play, as indicated on the score: "1 e 2 e 3 e 4 e 5 e 6 e" ("1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 and 6" in English)

Using a metronome is useful, but it is only a temporary crutch to lean on. You will benefit far more by counting the beats out loud as you play than by using a metronome. Internalizing the rhythm allows us in time to achieve both freedom and discipline when playing, that is, to be a musician.
If counting the smallest values out loud seems difficult, or very difficult, to you, it only means that you have to persevere, or persevere a lot more. Keep at it with determination until it becomes easy and natural for you. When, after having practised it long enough, this exercise of counting out loud while you play becomes easy, then you don't need to bother with it any more.



When you start working on a new piece, start by working very slowly, concentrating on precision. The essential thing is that you should play the music perfectly, that your rhythm should be precise, your sound well controlled, and your playing musical and expressive.
Speed will come with your new skills acquired in time through work. You should not worry about speed when tackling a new piece. At the beginning, such a preoccupation would only hinder you in your progress. It is only once you have mastered the piece within the comfort of a slow tempo, that you can start to think about playing progressively faster until finally you reach the right tempo.

- pages 12-13 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) MALAGUEÑA
To mark the beat for yourself, count the beats out loud as you play, as indicated on the score (1 e 2 e 3 e)
i.e. ("1 and 2 and 3 and").



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- exercice number 6 on page 73
- exercice number 40 on page 84,
- MALAGUEÑA on pages 12 and 13.


The work I'm asking of you is difficult and requires you to be both organized and disciplined. It is certain that you will struggle to get your fingers to perform the exact movements required for the exercises. In order to succeed in this, you need to make the same movements several dozen times daily. The goal of these exercises is to strengthen and stretch your finger muscles, to make your fingers stronger and more agile. Put in plenty of work, every day, on the difficult parts, focus on them and play the easy parts only occasionally.
To get the best out of your practice time, split it up into 15 minute sessions, and leave your hands to rest for at least 30 minutes between sessions. If your hands hurt, leave them to rest for an hour, the time it takes your body to eliminate the lactic acid in your muscles, which is the main cause of muscle pain.


Good luck!


I thank Charles (Charlesoln) and Geoff (GeoffB) who have helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Scott Fountain
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Bill Davis
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

David Yang
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Brian Hunker
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Archit Junnarkar
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Ben Spurr
exercice number 6
exercice number 40

Linda Shepherd
exercice number 6
exercice number 40

Teodora Despotovic Kosanovic
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA

Jeremy Gillard
exercice number 6
exercice number 40
MALAGUEÑA
:( + ♫ = :)

Scott Fountain

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Scott Fountain » Tue Oct 21, 2014 11:54 pm

Everyone,

Here is lesson #2. As always,comments are welcomed.

[media]https://youtu.be/EOJQrXY0nUQ[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/XUeXivIMoSI[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/ipsJaMZvZWQ[/media]

Stefan Srećković

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Stefan Srećković » Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:27 am

Scott, I've got a tip to share, and it's the same one I've been recommending to people for the past year or two.

Practice with a metronome until you get your intervals down right. Start off with whatever you're comfortable with, don't feel pressured by the deadline of the lesson (it exists not). In specific, I'm referring to Malaguena; the B section of Malaguena requires speed, so slowing down at the beginning on this section isn't what's meant to be done. Instead, start off at a snail's pace, but do make sure that once you get to the B section you do not slow down. Not one bit. Gradually bump that bpm counter up as you start feeling more comfortable with getting through the entire piece at a certain pace.

Metronome is your ally here, make the most of him.

--
Stefan

Shelby Brown

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Shelby Brown » Wed Oct 22, 2014 4:12 pm

Scott,
I would agree with Stefan's comments. I noticed that your right hand "C" finger..pinky, is sticking straight out. It should be in harmony (same finger position) with the "ima" fingers and actually moving with "a" finger when it is striking a string. Also, you might try playing measure 17-24 E (1st string) note with your "m" finger as indicated in the music. I find it easier to manage those measures and the speed required.

:merci: for being the first to post!

Shelby

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David Yang
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Yang » Wed Oct 22, 2014 11:47 pm

Stefan Srećković wrote:In specific, I'm referring to Malaguena; the B section of Malaguena requires speed, so slowing down at the beginning on this section isn't what's meant to be done. Instead, start off at a snail's pace, but do make sure that once you get to the B section you do not slow down. Not one bit.
I'm working on this piece, thanks for your advice :merci:
Music begins where language ends.

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Bill Davis
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Bill Davis » Fri Oct 24, 2014 6:55 am

Scott Fountain wrote:Everyone,

Here is lesson #2. As always,comments are welcomed.
Hi Scott,
Well, this is a difficult lesson. I congratulate you on a good attempt. I would agree with Stefan that we need a little help with this one, the metronome. I have been working on counting without the metronome but sometimes I am just not coordinated enough to have both hands moving and my brain thinking about counting. :aide:
Thanks,
Bill

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Bill Davis
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Bill Davis » Fri Oct 24, 2014 7:38 am

Hello All,
Well, this Malaguena song is a real road block. I will keep up at this song for a bit longer between other lessons, but I felt burnt out and I just want to post it and move on. I think I put a good 6 hours into this song to just get what you'll hear. I learned a lot with this song and I am inspired to do better with the next lesson, but this is my result. I know I missed some timing in bars 1-53 :chaud: Particularly 37-40, but then 41-44 kicks in and off come the wheels on the bus.

I am still working on a better camera angle so my posture can be viewed. I am also working on squaring up my fret hand to the fret board. Your comments are welcomed.

Thanks,
Bill

exercise number 6
[media]https://youtu.be/gwmKp4LZdaw[/media]
exercise number 40
[media]https://youtu.be/7cww3DjPNpA[/media]
MALAGUENA
[media]https://youtu.be/nb5SIZZoRmg[/media]

Brian Hunker

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Brian Hunker » Sat Oct 25, 2014 2:20 pm

Bill,

I think your recording of Malagueña was excellent. Very Very musical. Flowing, melodic and expressive. There is that one brief part at the end that seems extra difficult. But I think you actually got all the notes and even the timing basically right. The only reason it sticks out is because you play the rest of the piece with such ease and the sound is so well-polished. So its a bit of contrast to see you have to work for those notes.

But overall excellent work on this inceredibly difficult piece.

I'm currently not doing any better with my playing of that final section. But one thing I am doing that I feel is leading to improvement is that I am watching Prof. Delcamp's Malagueña video over and over. Especially watching his right hand movements during the final sections. I feel like the key is to getting that part right and avoiding struggle is to visually study the movements very precisely. If you look closely it seems like each measure has some slight difference in how the right hand articulation works. Like a new slightly different trick that you need to perform for each measure. If the right hand movements can be repeated exactly as Delcamp does them (or at least similarly enough), the clear sound and ease of play he demonstrates should also follow. I don't know if I will get the result I want this way, but that is how I am going about it. I plan to tape/post my results next week.

Scott Fountain

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Scott Fountain » Tue Oct 28, 2014 1:43 am

Bill Davis wrote:
Scott Fountain wrote:Everyone,

Here is lesson #2. As always,comments are welcomed.
Hi Scott,
Well, this is a difficult lesson. I congratulate you on a good attempt. I would agree with Stefan that we need a little help with this one, the metronome. I have been working on counting without the metronome but sometimes I am just not coordinated enough to have both hands moving and my brain thinking about counting. :aide:
Thanks,
Bill

Thanks Bill for the encouraging words. I know what you mean about counting and playing, it does get confusing. I started using the metronome before the lesson, just takes time.

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David Yang
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Location: Beijing, China

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Yang » Tue Oct 28, 2014 3:39 am

Music begins where language ends.

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Bill Davis
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Location: Nevada, USA

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Bill Davis » Tue Oct 28, 2014 5:59 am

Brian Hunker wrote:Bill,

I think your recording of Malagueña was excellent. Very Very musical. Flowing, melodic and expressive. There is that one brief part at the end that seems extra difficult. But I think you actually got all the notes and even the timing basically right. The only reason it sticks out is because you play the rest of the piece with such ease and the sound is so well-polished. So its a bit of contrast to see you have to work for those notes.

But overall excellent work on this inceredibly difficult piece.

I'm currently not doing any better with my playing of that final section. But one thing I am doing that I feel is leading to improvement is that I am watching Prof. Delcamp's Malagueña video over and over. Especially watching his right hand movements during the final sections. I feel like the key is to getting that part right and avoiding struggle is to visually study the movements very precisely. If you look closely it seems like each measure has some slight difference in how the right hand articulation works. Like a new slightly different trick that you need to perform for each measure. If the right hand movements can be repeated exactly as Delcamp does them (or at least similarly enough), the clear sound and ease of play he demonstrates should also follow. I don't know if I will get the result I want this way, but that is how I am going about it. I plan to tape/post my results next week.
Thank you Brian for the kind words and some good advise. I agree that being patient and following mr. delcamp as a model will produce a better result. That is some real sound advise. Thanks again! Bill

Brian Hunker

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Brian Hunker » Mon Nov 03, 2014 2:51 pm

Great job, David!

Your sound is great and so is your control over speed, timing, and expression. I am envious of your left and right hand posture, particularly in the exercise videos. Your Malagueña was also flawless. You made it look easy!

Brian Hunker

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Brian Hunker » Mon Nov 03, 2014 2:59 pm

Here's what I got after basically 2.5 weeks of working on this lesson:

[media]https://youtu.be/za2O61EcbRM[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/brN0J1JbYNo[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/wwlNB7cFYWY[/media]

The most frustrating thing is that as my ability to play this stuff increases from week to week, my expectations of how I want to sound seem to increase by twice as much!! So it would appear that I can't get no satisfaction. Oh well. Got to be more patient i guess. :ride:

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David Yang
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by David Yang » Mon Nov 03, 2014 11:52 pm

Brian Hunker wrote:The most frustrating thing is that as my ability to play this stuff increases from week to week, my expectations of how I want to sound seem to increase by twice as much!! So it would appear that I can't get no satisfaction. Oh well. Got to be more patient i guess. :ride:
Hi Brian, I think a gap from increasing expectation will keep driving us forward. Let's keep patient and enjoy our growth. Great job on this lesson :bravo:
Music begins where language ends.

Stefan Srećković

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 02

Post by Stefan Srećković » Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:22 am

Soon enough you'll start noticing how much your tone varies depending on the state of your nails, the temperature of your hands, and other miscellaneous factors :D

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