D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Jan 07, 2015 7:19 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Now we are going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 160 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) Exercices sur les harmoniques à l'octave (Exercises for octave harmonics):

exercise 110, play natural octave harmonics using both hands.
exercise 111, natural octave harmonics using one hand.
exercise 112, artificial octave harmonics: F and G on the first string.
exercise 113, natural and artificial octave harmonics: scale of E minor.
exercise 114, natural and artificial octave harmonics: arpeggio of E minor.
exercise 115, natural and artificial harmonics produced by touching the harmonic node of the string with the thumb.
exercise 116, natural and artificial harmonics produced by touching the harmonic node of the string with the index finger.












Today we'll look at 5 pieces.
- page 27 Anonyme Saltarello
I offer a fingering which makes it easier to control how long the basses ring on. You are free to use it or, along with the majority of guitarists, to opt for a fingering with all open strings in the bass.
Each phrase is repeated a second time with small embellishments. Thus bars 9 to 16 repeat bars 1 to 8, and bars 25 to 32 repeat bars 17 to 24.
The harmonics of the last few bars are natural harmonics produced by lightly touching the harmonic node of the string with a left-hand finger. In the final 3 bars, make a barré with the left-hand finger, just barely touching the strings.



- page 53 Niccolò PAGANINI (1782-1840) GHIRIBIZZO n°38
This is a lively piece. In my view, it should be played staccato to reveal its resolute, masterful side. A rare alliance of conviction and conciseness, it is a little masterpiece.



- page 70 Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude III opus 60
In this arpeggio study the three voices are each expressed in their turn. Mostly the bass appears on beats 1 and 4, the melody on beats 2 and 3, and the middle voice in between beats. Use rest stroke on the first string with the ring finger in order to bring out the melody.



- page 118 Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita
One of the charms of this very poetical piece is the melody in artificial harmonics. To produce these harmonics on the bass strings, I use my thumb to touch the harmonic node of the string at the indicated fret. Doing it this way allows me to stay close to the normal position.




- page 128 Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Lecciones III n°11
This is a lesson where the melody is played in artificial octave harmonics. To produce an artificial octave harmonic, the guitarist lightly touches the string with the index finger at a dividing point (a harmonic node) situated half way along the vibrating length of the string, while at the same time plucking the string with the ring finger as near as possible to the bridge. One of the difficulties is to play the melody in harmonics mezzo forte and the accompaniment piano. Either the ring finger or the little finger can be used for playing harmonics. The ring finger seems to me to be easier to use. The little finger is an interesting option because it can pluck the string further away from the point where it is being touched by the index finger. The further away from this point you can pluck the string, the louder and clearer is the sound obtained. To increase volume and clarity, stretch the plucking finger as far as possible from the finger touching the harmonic node.



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 70 Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude III opus 60
- page 118 Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita



Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude III opus 60
Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita

Gabriel-guégan
Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude III opus 60
Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita

Stewart Doyle
Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude III opus 60
Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita

David Smyth
Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude III opus 60
Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita

Pentti Kotilainen
Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Etude III opus 60
Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita

Goran Penic
Agustín Barrios Mangoré (1885-1944) El sueño de la muñequita
:( + ♫ = :)

Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Stewart Doyle » Tue Jan 13, 2015 8:45 pm

Hi everyone,

Some thoughts on the Carcassi...
I'm going to resist the temptation to play a full barre in bar 7, using finger 4 to play the top E, as I think it'll be a useful exercise to try to raise the barring finger so that the top open string can sound. I also think it's respectful to M. Delcamp to follow the suggested fingering as they may be suggested for specific reasons as above. I'm struggling to see the benefit of using finger 4 for the F# then finger 3 for the D# though. Anyone have any idea, other than it's a good idea to master more awkward positions like this because one day there may be no alternative?

Thanks

Stewart
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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Marko Räsänen » Wed Jan 14, 2015 7:37 am

Hi Stewart,

I guess using 4 for f# and 3 for d# has also the effect of building finger strength and independence for fingers 3 and 4. The benefits are similar as doing the 'Extensions' exercise. If I recall correctly I also found that fingering awkward in the beginning, but it soon started to feel natural. What comes to not having an alternative, I guess there will always be alternatives, but the more you have options that don't feel too awkward (as the result of practice), the less compromises that will affect the musical end result you need to do, e.g. legato.
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David.Smyth
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by David.Smyth » Wed Jan 14, 2015 11:59 am

Hi Stewart,

I've been experimenting with the fingering of bar 7 too, trying it a few different ways. It's definitely doable as fingered in vol 5 but I am finding it quite tricky to get the D# with 3 without it buzzing. I think your alternative suggestion, i.e. 3 for the F# and 4 for the D# is better and more stable. However, I am not convinced that a full barre is not the way to go as it seems to be easier to play that way. We still need to get the 1st finger down very quickly so that the first B is clean but I am finding that working more consistently.

Since this is an Etude, I think we should also consider what Carcassi was aiming to "drill" with this piece. I haven't been able to find a definitive description of this but, on the face of it, No. III is an arpeggio exercise with a focus on bringing out the 3 separate voices, particularly balancing the upper and lower voices. So it is mainly targeted at the right hand and this would suggest the approach for left hand fingering should be to make it as easy as possible without sacrificing tone.

Looking at the melody line and thinking about tone, I can see arguments both ways. With the full barre in bar 7 the melody is carried on the 2nd string which seems to make some sense in terms of consistency of tone. With the fingering in M. Delcamp's arrangement, the high E in bar 6 is played on the open 1st so doing the same in bar 7 has merit. On the other hand, the E in bar 6 falls on the "weaker" melody beat whereas in bar 7 it falls on the "stronger" melody beat so a slight tonal variation between the 2 "E's" can be supported.

To my mind, the determining factor in situations like this should be which fingering sounds better musically and we need to drill our technique to be able to play it that way. If there is a no discernible difference musically between the alternative fingerings it then comes down to which fingering is the easier/safer to play. I'm going to practice it both ways for the next while and see where that gets me.

Dave
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David.Smyth
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by David.Smyth » Wed Jan 14, 2015 1:26 pm

Hi Stewart,

Took another look at the video just now. From this it looks to me like M. Delcamp plays bar 7 with the following LH fingering: 1st finger for low B on 5; 4th finger for F# on 4; 2nd finger for A on 3; open 1st for high E - then for the third beat he lifts 2nd finger, puts down a barre covering strings 5 to 1 (for B on 5 and A on 3); with 3rd finger for D# on 2 and leaving 4th in place on 4 for F#.

This approach might be easier to play cleanly than placing the barre from the start of bar 7 but keeping the 1st finger raised off the 1st string? I'll have to try this tonight when I get back to my guitar!

Dave
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Strings: D'Addario Pro-Arté EJ45 Normal Tension
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Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Stewart Doyle » Wed Jan 14, 2015 7:14 pm

Thank you Marko and Dave for your thoughts and well spotted Dave, I've had a quick look and you are quite right. That explains why 4 is needed for F# as it's quite a stretch to do the first part of bar 7 with 1,2 and 3. I still find using 3 for the D# tricky though when the barre is down and i think I'll only finger it this way to strengthen the flexibility and independence of my LH fingers. Having said that, the Barrios is so challenging I may end just going for the easier option on the Carcassi!

Thanks again,

Stewart
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Gabriel-guégan
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Gabriel-guégan » Sat Jan 24, 2015 5:41 pm

Hello to all
Here are my day videos
Matteo Carcassi - Etude n°3 opus 60
[media]https://youtu.be/JU7EZw68QWw[/media]
And because the exercises on the harmonious made me work it, here is also the study n°11 from book III of Julio Sagreras
[media]https://youtu.be/5imLlUbWbCQ[/media]
Thank you for your listening and advice

:bye: Gabriel

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:40 pm

:bravo: Gabriel :casque:
The Sagreras is a sweet little melody. I still pick it up from time to time after playing it in last years lessons. I think you played it very well. Sorry about the wrong note(s) in the end (just when you think you're about to finish the piece without errors.) The only thing I suggest working on is playing the accompaniment softer. I think almost as soft as possible. Then you may also relax the harmonics melody to produce less sharp sound (use less force).

On the Carcassi. Try to let the melody sing more. You are lifting/moving the 4th finger a bit early, cutting the note short. Sometimes even sounding (weak) the next note before it is plucked. Still enjoyable! Cheers :bye:
Last edited by Håvard.Bergene on Sun Jan 25, 2015 3:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Gabriel-guégan
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Gabriel-guégan » Sun Jan 25, 2015 1:20 pm

Thank you Håvard for yours advices and for the wrong note which i didn't have noticed
:bye:

Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Stewart Doyle » Sun Jan 25, 2015 3:24 pm

:bravo: Gabriel for both pieces. Although the Carcassi is well played at a very good tempo, I was also trying to describe the effect that Hårvard mentions. It's almost as though you have a grace note added to the main two notes of the melody. It's a small thing but when the rest is played so well, including bar 7 that I'm still not sure how to play, it does stand out.
The Sagreras piece sounds good practice for the Barrios. I'll probably try to get a decent recording of the Carcassi first and then attempt the Barrios.....
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Gabriel-guégan
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Gabriel-guégan » Sun Jan 25, 2015 5:38 pm

Thank you Stewart
Sure I having "lifting/moving the 4th finger a bit early" for some notes. Sound is probably my nail result in apoyando. After having break two fo them i try to learn again to use them
Sagreras' harmonics are not the same that Barrios' ones, not the same fingers. Lesson n°10 would be better for practice
:bye:

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Gabriel-guégan
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Gabriel-guégan » Mon Jan 26, 2015 5:28 pm

Here a new take to correct the Sagreras :bye:
[media]https://youtu.be/wXQeQxPjCWA[/media]
edit : i add my day video to complet this lesson
[media]https://youtu.be/lyQlLnrkIU8[/media]
:bye:

Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Stewart Doyle » Sun Feb 01, 2015 7:47 pm

:bravo: Gabriel, it was a real pleasure to listen to your Barrios, particularly the harmonics section. Perhaps bars 14-15 would benefit from some additional practice, but all in all, very impressive!
I'm a long way behind with that piece and lesson 6 starts next Wednesday! I'm just uploading the Carcassi below, so I can concentrate on trying to get the Barrios recorded in the next week or so.....

Carcassi, Study III, Opus 60
[media]https://youtu.be/dfGlGOn8jzw[/media]

:bye:
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Mon Feb 02, 2015 1:11 pm

:bravo: Gabriel and Stewart :casque:

Gabriel, I think you play beautifully (you guitar has a lovely rich tone too) and it seems to me that you have mastered the various types of harmonics very well indeed. Congratulations!

Stewart, it was wonderfully relaxing to listen to your recording (which also means that I wasn't disturbed by any errors or anything, it just flowed gently and peacefully). Well done too, for managing to keep up with these demanding lessons on schedule, whilst juggling the rest of life.

I guess it's pretty clear that I've not managed to keep up with these lessons :oops:
From September onwards, it seemed like one thing after another got in the way, and my practice was reduced to occasional dabbling, which is not enough to make any progress.

This last month has been a bit better, and I've been practicing harmonics and these pieces at least a couple of times a week, which has meant that progress has been frustratingly slow - but as expected for so little investment. Any recording would be too painful for you to listen to, so I may park this lesson as a 'work in progress' and see if I can join in properly with lesson 6. (I'm hoping that typing it here will make it happen :wink: )
Regards, Linda

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Gabriel-guégan
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Gabriel-guégan » Mon Feb 02, 2015 2:31 pm

:merci: Linda & Stewart
Stewart Doyle wrote:Perhaps bars 14-15 would benefit from some additional practice
Yes, strangly first part still difficult for me and specially these two measures. I will keep this lovely piece in fingers

Steawart, your Study III is just well done :casque:
Your interpretation is nice and quiet, there are just the Piano and Pianopiano parts which could be played softer. Out of that it's :okok:
LindaWoodford wrote:This last month has been a bit better, and I've been practicing harmonics and these pieces at least a couple of times a week, which has meant that progress has been frustratingly slow - but as expected for so little investment. Any recording would be too painful for you to listen to, so I may park this lesson as a 'work in progress' and see if I can join in properly with lesson 6. (I'm hoping that typing it here will make it happen :wink:
It will be a pleasure to listen at you for a piece of lesson 6 or an other. More important is choosing one which you like, and take time for well work it. For the course schedule if it is not for this year it would be for the next in D05 or D06
:bye:

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