pizza

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
Marshall Dixon
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Re: pizza

Post by Marshall Dixon » Mon Jul 08, 2019 1:31 pm

RJVB wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:54 pm
No olive oil in an Italian pizza dough recipe?? ...
Yes! I use about a teaspoon of it to coat the flour and oil the bowl after adding the second half of the flour while it rises. This gets kneaded in at the end.

Glad you caught that.

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RJVB
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Re: pizza

Post by RJVB » Mon Jul 08, 2019 6:21 pm

Me too ;)
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marvluse

Re: pizza

Post by marvluse » Mon Jul 08, 2019 8:19 pm

casy wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 8:49 pm
What's your favorite pizza?...
I'm talking mainly about the frozen kind that you get at the supermarket...
You're kiddin' right? There is no "favorite" frozen pizza at the supermarket, unless you have no taste buds and no discrimination. :D

Almost all frozen prepared foods at a supermarket are barely above the level of dog food. My dogs love 'em. I do not.

Rick Hutt
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Re: pizza

Post by Rick Hutt » Tue Jul 09, 2019 2:26 pm

Nobody's chimed in about Chicago deep dish pizza, so I won't either, but.....
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RJVB
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Re: pizza

Post by RJVB » Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:50 pm

Of course you had to give a peep :D

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Formerly: Brian Cohen baroque violin (London, 1985), Nadegini modern violin (Paris, 1924)

Andrew Pohlman
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Re: pizza

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:12 pm

I make BBQ pizza. We start with tradition pizza dough, brushed with olive oil. I "bake" on one side, flip it over, then the cheese goes on first, then sauce, then any toppings go on last. It really is a different experience than a more traditional pizza.
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dory
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Re: pizza

Post by dory » Fri Jul 19, 2019 3:08 pm

I haven’t found a frozen pizza that I like. We tried DiGiorno once because their ads on TV make it look so good. Wet cardboard. Therd is one pizzeria in town that we like. I also sometimes make pizza in a frying pan. Put it on the stove first to crisp the bottom, put on the toppings and put it into the oven. We are both overweight, though, so we don’t eat a ton of pizza.
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RJVB
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Re: pizza

Post by RJVB » Fri Jul 19, 2019 7:37 pm

I also make skillet pizza from time to time, but just preheat the (oiled) skillet with the oven, sprinkle some sesame seeds, fennel seeds or coarse corn meal in the hot oil and then transfer the rolled dough. Takes a bit of practice not to burn your fingers but the bottom gets as crisp as you want that way :)
Gretsch G9240 "Alligator" wood-body resonator converted to non-metal strings (China, 2018?)
Bolink baroque violin (Hilversum, 1982)
Formerly: Brian Cohen baroque violin (London, 1985), Nadegini modern violin (Paris, 1924)

Dirck Nagy
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Re: pizza

Post by Dirck Nagy » Sat Jul 20, 2019 4:17 pm

This sauce is quick and sooooo easy! Don’t pollute your pizza with canned sauce!

1/4 small Onion, diced very fine
1 small (6 oz) can Tomato Paste
1 can of water
1+ Tbsp Olive Oil
1 Tbsp Oregano
1 tsp Basil
1/2 tsp Crushed Red Pepper
1/4 tsp Garlic Powder
1/4 tsp Salt
1/4 tsp Black Pepper

Sauté Onion with Olive Oil in a small saucepan until the pieces are translucent (but not browned). Add the rest of the ingredients. Bring to boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer for a few minutes. Stir occasionally.


Here is my Pizza Dough recipe:

1 cup Water
3 cups Flour (high-gluten, unbleached Bread flour works best)
1 tsp Gluten
1+ Tbsp Olive Oil
2 tsp (or less) Sugar
1/2 tsp Yeast
2 tsp Salt.

Knead, and let rise.

Roll thin, put what you want on top, slide it onto a hot (450+) oven on a stone. Let sit for a minute when its done, then drizzle more olive oil on the crust.

Enjoy!

cheers
dirck

simonm
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Re: pizza

Post by simonm » Sat Jul 20, 2019 5:06 pm

Dirck Nagy wrote:
Sat Jul 20, 2019 4:17 pm
Don’t pollute your pizza with sauce!
Fixed it for you. :mrgreen:

Get some good plum tomatoes. Remove the peel. Chop them up and boil for a while. Done.

Spread this thinly on the pizza base. Add a little salt if desired. Put on the topping of your choice. Add the real mozzerella sparingly. Dried herbs, dried garlic powder etc have no place on a pizza unless you want an industrial flavour.

You don't need all the "flavour enhancers" (dried herbs, dried garlic, onions, black pepper and so on) if the tomatoes have a favour which unfortunately is rarely the case today unless you have some nice varieties you grow yourself or if you live close to a producer. Unfortunately most tomatoes sold today are, optically wonderful, red, taste-free, water bags whose other important characteristic is a long shelf life.

Here is a precise legal definition/receipe for a "Neopolitan Pizza" https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/Le ... 016:En:PDF right down to the Pantone colours which correspond to a correctly cooked pizza.
The receipe as such is on pages 4-6 in the pdf. Available 10 or more languages.
(I posted it here a couple of years ago).

Dirck Nagy
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Re: pizza

Post by Dirck Nagy » Sat Jul 20, 2019 7:58 pm

simonm wrote:
Sat Jul 20, 2019 5:06 pm
Dirck Nagy wrote:
Sat Jul 20, 2019 4:17 pm
Oh, sure, of course its better to make everything from scratch.

But one doesn't always have the luxury of time, disposable income, fresh herbs, or access to wood-fired ovens. The recipe I shared is a good quick one for everyday consumption; a "Vin Ordinaire" or "Tafelwein" of pizza. It can be made in just a couple hours with readily available ingredients.

I grow plenty of tomatos and do a lot of sauces etc in the summer.

Also, have you tried pizza with either Pesto or simply brushed with Olive Oil instead of tomato sauce?

(BTW, I once wrote a cookbook)

cheers!
dirck

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David Norton
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Re: pizza

Post by David Norton » Sat Jul 20, 2019 11:13 pm

I have three infallible go-to pizza recipes here in Salt Lake City:

Rusted Sun Pizza: (801) XXX-2120
Pie Pizzeria: (801) XXX-5151
Wild Mushroom Pizzeria: (801) XXX-6100

Perfect pizza within 30 minutes, except weekends when Rusted Sun and Wild Mushroom are closer to 45-50 minutes, and Pie Pizzeria is impossible to get delivered on weekends.
David Norton
Salt Lake City, UT

simonm
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Re: pizza

Post by simonm » Sun Jul 21, 2019 9:46 am

Dirck Nagy wrote:
Sat Jul 20, 2019 7:58 pm
...

Also, have you tried pizza with either Pesto or simply brushed with Olive Oil instead of tomato sauce?
As far as pizza and related food goes, I think its a case of "been there, done that, but didn't bother with the t-shirt" :-)

As the years have gone by we are more and more for the simplest versions - less work to make and "clean", "pure" flavours, hence the aversion to complex sauces. Our quick version is using a bought passata making sure it is a simple one with at most salt added, no acidifier (usually citric acid in Germany). We generally don't put any oil on the pizza except for a little in the base sometimes. The EU recipe is actually pretty close to what we do.

"Blanca" pizzas are quite common in Italy or at least in some areas. The most unusual pizza we had was in Sicily, in Siculiana west of Agrigento on the south coast. It was a blanca and the total pizza consisted of pizza base (medium thickness) and artichoke puree. I no longer remember if there was even any cheese on it. It was quite nice. If we even go there again we would swing by the place and try it again. It is likely seasonal as the artichoke paste was from artichokes not bottled artichoke hearts. The also had a "baked radicchio" as a starter. Again ultra simple, and ultra quick. Cut the radicchio in half, put in hot oven (the pizza oven) for a minute or three. Put on plate. Customer adds oil and salt to taste. I liked it, my wife didn't. I have done it a few times at home. It is quite bitter so not everyone's taste; a small radicchio could be shared as starter for a few people.

I don't understand why people buy ready made pizza bases. Dough is so simple and quick to make. The only requirement is to decide at least a few hours in advance that you want pizza: 3-5 mins to make dough and let it sit for anything from 2 to 24 hours. Final kneading and rolling out is also only a few minutes. By the time the oven has warmed up, the dough is rolled out and topping in place. A pizza cook, probably Italian, in a place in the UK promised me any pizza I wanted in 3-4 minutes. He rolled the dough and put on the toppings in about one minute, put it in the hot oven for about 2 mins or so. It was a very good Italian style thin pizza.

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RJVB
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Re: pizza

Post by RJVB » Sun Jul 21, 2019 10:26 am

I think the correct (Italian) term would be "bianca" ;) They're quite popular now but I presume they always existed, you just had to study the ingredient list to know which was which (someday there may be a "pasta bianca" category on menus too).

The "funniest" pizza I've known was in Urbino in the late 90s or early 2000s: pizza ciclista. Just the dough with a bit of olive oil and some dried herbs. The cheapest and leanest, aimed at the bicycling tourist who either had very little money to spend or didn't want to absorb more calories than strictly necessary (or both) :)
The same region also has "cresce sfogliate" BTW, which are the complete opposite at least in terms of number of calories and the amount of work required: they're a kind of large pancakes from a pie crust (or croissant) kind dough made with lard instead of butter.
Gretsch G9240 "Alligator" wood-body resonator converted to non-metal strings (China, 2018?)
Bolink baroque violin (Hilversum, 1982)
Formerly: Brian Cohen baroque violin (London, 1985), Nadegini modern violin (Paris, 1924)

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