Chopin Pronunciation

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kirolak
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Chopin Pronunciation

Post by kirolak » Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:17 pm

Why is the name Chopin usually pronounced as if it were French? I think it was spelled Sjopin (I stand under correction) originally . . . :?
Last edited by kirolak on Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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erichert
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by erichert » Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:23 pm

It was his father's name (Nicolas Chopin) which was French.

Lovemyguitar
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Lovemyguitar » Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:28 pm

kirolak wrote:
Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:17 pm
Why is the name Chopin usually pronounced as if it were French? I think it was spelled Sjopin (I stand under correction) originally . . . :?
I do not think that you are correct about that Polish spelling. Chopin's father was French (I see someone else has just pointed that out), he was born in France and later emigrated to Poland. From everything I've read, the name is French, thus, the French spelling and pronunciation.

soltirefa
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by soltirefa » Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:31 pm

"I think you should cook that in a skillet."

"Show (me the) pan."

kirolak
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by kirolak » Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:35 pm

Aha! Thank you for explaining that, I should have looked it up myself. . .

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Hotsoup
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Hotsoup » Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:50 pm

I often wonder how much effort one should put into foreign pronunciations. Is there a rule? It seems arbitrary to me that some words are expected to be pronounced according to their origins, while others aren't. For example, when I watch English cooking shows and everyone pronounces croissant "a la francais" I get kind of annoyed. There are probably many examples.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Rick Beauregard » Wed Jul 31, 2019 5:56 pm

Ha ha. Good question Kevin.

I can think of only a few reasons:

-pandering to the audience, as in politicians showing how good their Spanish is
-courtesy to the audience as in politicians showing how bad their Spanish is.
-condescending to the audience as in showing how cultured and educated you are compared to your audience.
-communicating where you’re from: it’s Con’ chord Massachusetts (or California or the airplane) , but Con’cud NH.
-just to annoy.

That last one is my modus operandi.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
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Hotsoup
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Hotsoup » Wed Jul 31, 2019 6:23 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Wed Jul 31, 2019 5:56 pm
Ha ha. Good question Kevin.

I can think of only a few reasons:

-pandering to the audience, as in politicians showing how good their Spanish is
-courtesy to the audience as in politicians showing how bad their Spanish is.
-condescending to the audience as in showing how cultured and educated you are compared to your audience.
-communicating where you’re from: it’s Con’ chord Massachusetts (or California or the airplane) , but Con’cud NH.
-just to annoy.

That last one is my modus operandi.
LOL - I'm sure that I butcher any Spanish, Portuguese and Italian related to guitar stuff, for reason number 2. I'm just not sure I understand the reason for even trying, considering I know none of those languages, nor their phonetics.

VasquezBob
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by VasquezBob » Thu Aug 01, 2019 4:33 am

So, just how is "Chopin" pronounced? I speak two languages and I'm working on a third which is Italian, of course). Learning foreign pronunciations, languages and, especially, dual-language jokes is fun stuff. BTW, how do we pronounce "Beauregard"?

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Thu Aug 01, 2019 8:26 am

VasquezBob wrote:BTW, how do we pronounce "Beauregard"?
Good luck working that one out.

For my part I had no idea that there was more than one way to pronounce croissant. What's the other?

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Hotsoup
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Hotsoup » Thu Aug 01, 2019 12:58 pm

Rick please correct us but I assumed "BOH-regard". I'd assume the French pronunciation would be similar but without any enunciated "d" or consonant stop at the end. (Sorry, my linguistics are rusty, it was a long time ago..)

Croissant though, I often hear a franglais pronunciation: CWAH-SAHN with a nasal second syllable, and maybe a throaty 'r'. Even though I can speak passing French at times, I just say /kɹəˈsɑnt/ when speaking English.
(Listen to sound bite for US pronunciation here)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Aug 01, 2019 1:55 pm

There can be wide varieties but when one says “BEW ree guard” ( just like bureau, right?)...I cringe.

BO ray gaard
soft d and subtly rolled r’s

As I’ve told all my dates over the years, it means “good looking.”

I love QUA san. Makes me smile. I also love how some English accents sound like Daffy Duck or Elmer Fud.

Croissants, Ganz Blueberry Jam and coffee would be nice for our next Blaine Guitar Circle.
Last edited by Rick Beauregard on Thu Aug 01, 2019 2:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

musicbyandy
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by musicbyandy » Thu Aug 01, 2019 3:04 pm

Hotsoup wrote:
Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:50 pm
I often wonder how much effort one should put into foreign pronunciations. Is there a rule? It seems arbitrary to me that some words are expected to be pronounced according to their origins, while others aren't. For example, when I watch English cooking shows and everyone pronounces croissant "a la francais" I get kind of annoyed. There are probably many examples.
I'm not aware of such a rule. I'm not aware of what agency would create or enforce such a rule. I guess that some people do not get annoyed when watching English cooking shows and everyone pronounces croissant "a la francais".

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Hotsoup
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by Hotsoup » Thu Aug 01, 2019 3:13 pm

musicbyandy wrote:
Thu Aug 01, 2019 3:04 pm
Hotsoup wrote:
Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:50 pm
I often wonder how much effort one should put into foreign pronunciations. Is there a rule? It seems arbitrary to me that some words are expected to be pronounced according to their origins, while others aren't. For example, when I watch English cooking shows and everyone pronounces croissant "a la francais" I get kind of annoyed. There are probably many examples.
I'm not aware of such a rule. I'm not aware of what agency would create or enforce such a rule. I guess that some people do not get annoyed when watching English cooking shows and everyone pronounces croissant "a la francais".
There's a classical guitar podcast where the presenter is very careful about pronouncing any non-English words in the accent of that word's language. It always bothered me. I don't know, maybe it's just me. Do you always pronounce foreign words with a foreign accent? Do you ever have trouble deciding if you should?

musicbyandy
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Re: Chopin Pronunciation

Post by musicbyandy » Thu Aug 01, 2019 3:21 pm

Hotsoup wrote:
Thu Aug 01, 2019 3:13 pm
musicbyandy wrote:
Thu Aug 01, 2019 3:04 pm
Hotsoup wrote:
Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:50 pm
I often wonder how much effort one should put into foreign pronunciations. Is there a rule? It seems arbitrary to me that some words are expected to be pronounced according to their origins, while others aren't. For example, when I watch English cooking shows and everyone pronounces croissant "a la francais" I get kind of annoyed. There are probably many examples.
I'm not aware of such a rule. I'm not aware of what agency would create or enforce such a rule. I guess that some people do not get annoyed when watching English cooking shows and everyone pronounces croissant "a la francais".
There's a classical guitar podcast where the presenter is very careful about pronouncing any non-English words in the accent of that word's language. It always bothered me. I don't know, maybe it's just me. Do you always pronounce foreign words with a foreign accent? Do you ever have trouble deciding if you should?
I'm curious to know of this classical guitar podcast, I would like to listen.
I sometimes pronounce foreign words with a foreign accent.
I wager that I am not in complete agreement with all other people as to which words are foreign to English and which words are not foreign to English.
I think I sometimes have trouble deciding if I should pronounce foreign words and proper nouns with a foreign accent.
I doubt that you are the only person bothered by hearing non-English words in the accent of the word's language.

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