Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

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Arduous
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by Arduous » Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:15 pm

This is my teacher in Houston Tx.
I can not get enough of his playing and his level of musical knowledge, always utterly modest.
That's why I recently decided to take lessons twice a week...lol
In this video he's playing a Dominique Field. He and I have one each, except his is a cedar. Very rear indeed.
This guitar was made by Field for Manuel Barrueco who owned it for a few years.


ChristianSchwengeler
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by ChristianSchwengeler » Tue Apr 09, 2019 9:47 pm

Arduous wrote:
Mon Apr 08, 2019 10:15 pm
This is my teacher in Houston Tx.
I can not get enough of his playing and his level of musical knowledge, always utterly modest.
That's why I recently decided to take lessons twice a week...lol
In this video he's playing a Dominique Field. He and I have one each, except his is a cedar. Very rear indeed.
This guitar was made by Field for Manuel Barrueco who owned it for a few years.
Hi Arduous, thank you for posting. Beautifull interpretation and good sounding instrument too. Not easy to get the accent right in this piece and he has it all in the right place and he is a very good player indeed! :)

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guitarrista
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by guitarrista » Tue Apr 09, 2019 11:35 pm

ChristianSchwengeler wrote:
Mon Apr 01, 2019 8:25 pm
Let's continue with another rare recording, it is Dejan Ivanovic playing at the Guimarães Guitar Festival in 2013, at the Paço dos Duques de Bragança and this was at the same time the premiere of the piece "SuiTUs" by Ricardo Abreu, which also apears in the video in the end when he is presented to the public as the composer of this fantastic piece.
Thank you for this! I just purchased it from D'Oz productions. Also the 3rd part, LagrimUS, is a great tremolo piece, which I will include in the Classical Tremolo Pieces Reference Guide when I update it in May.
Konstantin
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Marshall Dixon
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by Marshall Dixon » Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:27 pm

ChristianSchwengeler wrote:
Mon Apr 08, 2019 9:42 pm

I wonder always if you are a Marshall or if it is just a username, or if you use Marshall as a personal name in the US? Orgeon must be nice, at least I think that you are from there is this correct? There is a band form the 70ties which is called Oregon and I like it a lot. I am Swiss originally and Oregon can't be so diferent in some places or is it?
I am not affiliated with any law enforcement agency, real or imagined. Those marshals are spelled with one 'L' by the way. Nor do I have any association with the amplifier used in the previous video I posted. That's my real name up there.

As far as my sister is concerned; I think she hates music and only plays the accordian to keep stray cats out of the garden. :lol:

We drove through Switzerland in August 1964. My dad was a serviceman stationed in Gemany and an avid car-camper. We were headed to Italy to camp on the beach near Vada. When I moved to Oregon I actually said to myself; "this reminds me of Switzerland." Not just because of the topography but the roadsides were clean!

The piece by Bruno Teixeira was realy good. When I look up 'fura vida' on the internet translator it comes up 'stick life' as in sticking to something. Surely many of us know of those who are born into wealth and accomplish nothing in their lives. Like Beethoven said; "what is beautiful makes one sweat."

I've been listenning to the Russian 7 string guitar lately. Unfortunately since I can't read the alphabet I have a hard time knowing what is OK to post.

Here is another composition for 7 string guitar, Brazillian tuning in this case, I believe. Ritmo Colombiano arranged and played by Yamandu Costa.



ChristianSchwengeler
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by ChristianSchwengeler » Thu Apr 11, 2019 10:07 pm

guitarrista wrote:
Tue Apr 09, 2019 11:35 pm
Thank you for this! I just purchased it from D'Oz productions. Also the 3rd part, LagrimUS, is a great tremolo piece, which I will include in the Classical Tremolo Pieces Reference Guide when I update it in May.

Hi guitarrista, Thank you for your reply, I am glad that it was usefull. I knew Ricardo's compositions first when I was on a festival here in Portugal and one of the students palyed a piece of him for me, and I was really surprised. I didn't know that it is available as a score, good to know!
Marshall Dixon wrote:
Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:27 pm

We drove through Switzerland in August 1964. My dad was a serviceman stationed in Gemany and an avid car-camper. We were headed to Italy to camp on the beach near Vada. When I moved to Oregon I actually said to myself; "this reminds me of Switzerland." Not just because of the topography but the roadsides were clean!

The piece by Bruno Teixeira was realy good. When I look up 'fura vida' on the internet translator it comes up 'stick life' as in sticking to something. Surely many of us know of those who are born into wealth and accomplish nothing in their lives. Like Beethoven said; "what is beautiful makes one sweat."
I've been listenning to the Russian 7 string guitar lately. Unfortunately since I can't read the alphabet I have a hard time knowing what is OK to post.
Here is another composition for 7 string guitar, Brazillian tuning in this case, I believe. Ritmo Colombiano arranged and played by Yamandu Costa.
The piece in your video is "Porro"from Gentil Montãna. I know an orquestra version of it on the tube, and you shouldn't miss it, really funny! Search for Porro Suite Colombiana Nº 2 Gentil Montaña Big Band

Interessting that you know Switzerland. I have never been in the US, but I had a friend in Highschool which was from New Mexico, Los Alamos, an exchange student, as his father made an exchange year as an nuclear ingeneer in Brown Boveri corp. which was all around where I grew up and half of my family worked there. We had a real good time together and did skiing like fools and much more, and I became very familiar with your language and he with our dialect, which was pretty funny.

But Switzerland is actually way to clean for my taste and also too straight. I am a big fan of the portuguese improvisation capacity, which has pretty much no limite, we call it "desenrascar" which would mean something like pull the wagon out of the dirt.

This is another composition of my friend Bruno, it is a homenage to Granada where he went to buy a guitar from Antonio Raya Ferrer Pardo. So he composed this piece as memory to it: Goodbye Granada Very nice too. and the guitar in the video is of course the guitar he bought.


Marshall Dixon
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by Marshall Dixon » Sun Apr 14, 2019 5:47 pm

guitarrista wrote:
Tue Apr 09, 2019 11:35 pm

... is a great tremolo piece...
Hi guitarrista,

I hadn't been following your thread on tremelo but just looked over. You are undoubtedly familiar with this piece but just in case, and for those reading who aren't.

Guillermo Gomez (1880-1955) was a guitarrist and composer; moved to Mexico in 1900, and brought the 'Tarrega Method' with him. You can read a little about him and find his comositions here: finefretted (dot) org/html/guillermo_gomez.html ( I think this is a commercial site, so fix the dot).

He became famous but I can only find one recording (that I've had for years) and only recently found the above publications.

His fantastic composition 'Tremelo' was recorded by him in 1928.


Marshall Dixon
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by Marshall Dixon » Sun Apr 14, 2019 6:26 pm

ChristianSchwengeler wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 10:07 pm

This is another composition of my friend Bruno, it is a homenage to Granada where he went to buy a guitar from Antonio Raya Ferrer Pardo. So he composed this piece as memory to it: Goodbye Granada Very nice too. and the guitar in the video is of course the guitar he bought.
I enjoyed that one too. There is a phrase in it that reminds me of Amerian folk song. I can't think of any particular song so I think it is more of an emotionally evocative thing that music does.

I listened to the orchestral version of Ritmo Colombiano! Someone said that the guitar is like a miniature orchestra and I think we have proof.

Now the topic is "lesser known pieces" and, not being the most knowledgeable on any subject, I'm liable to post something that is generally well known, but new to me. The following is a case in point. Just discovered last week as a result of your thread!

Transcribed and performed by Edson Lopez. Don't tell me there's an orchestral version of it too! :D


ChristianSchwengeler
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by ChristianSchwengeler » Mon Apr 15, 2019 7:54 pm

Marshall Dixon wrote:
Sun Apr 14, 2019 5:47 pm
Hi guitarrista,
I hadn't been following your thread on tremelo but just looked over. You are undoubtedly familiar with this piece but just in case, and for those reading who aren't.
Guillermo Gomez (1880-1955) was a guitarrist and composer; moved to Mexico in 1900, and brought the 'Tarrega Method' with him. You can read a little about him and find his comositions here: finefretted (dot) org/html/guillermo_gomez.html ( I think this is a commercial site, so fix the dot).
He became famous but I can only find one recording (that I've had for years) and only recently found the above publications.
His fantastic composition 'Tremelo' was recorded by him in 1928.
Hi Marshall interessting tremolo piece, never heard of Guillermo Gomez and it is good to know about. As you are talking about tremolo: The following video is a composition of Patricio Sanhueza Barría from Chile, whom I met in Lisbon 10 years ago and we became friends. This is a tremolo study with the name, Estudio para vencer el frio, which makes reference to the cold concert players do feel when they have stage fright, and this serie of studies has the purpose to prepare the player before the concert.

His tremeolo study is one of the best I know because it is made in way that you cant simply play pami pami pami but it is a 6 beat pattern with the tumb which leads to a situation where you have 5 beats on the trebles + one on the tumb and this has then this effect: pamima pmimam pimami pmamim pamima pmimam pimami pmamim pamima pmimam pimami pmamim......and in fact your are playing the sequence always forwards and backwards and starting the sequence with a new finger , first you start with a then with m then with i then with m again and then back to a. This avoids that you enter in a gallop pattern and the tremolo is absolutly regular and you learn to use your right hand in a very diferent way, This is one of the best studies for the right hand I have ever seen. You can find the score here viewtopic.php?f=12&t=74153&p=813260&hil ... ia#p807907

The video Edson Lopes is beautifull. I have seen him in concert last year near Lisbon, he is a friend of Silvestre Fonseca who brought him here. He is a very good player and I love his videos recordings!

So here Patricio Sanhueza Barría, Estudio para vencer el frio nº 1, it is him self in person on the guitar:

Last edited by ChristianSchwengeler on Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.

ChristianSchwengeler
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by ChristianSchwengeler » Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:06 pm

This is another composer and player from Portugal, Manuel Tavares who is Professor de Guitarra Clássica na empresa Orfeão de Ovar, and studied classical guitar in Aveiro University. The name of this composition is the three girls and it is absolutely beautifull, this score is probably also edited for sale, I would have to check:

"Três meninas"
I - Salomé
II - Vanina
III - Dança da Catarina


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David Gutowski
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by David Gutowski » Wed Apr 17, 2019 6:09 am

Wonderful playing!

Thanks for posting.

Regards,
David
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Marshall Dixon
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by Marshall Dixon » Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:07 pm

ChristianSchwengeler wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 7:54 pm

The video Edson Lopes is beautifull. I have seen him in concert last year near Lisbon, he is a friend of Silvestre Fonseca who brought him here. He is a very good player and I love his videos recordings
I enjoy his own compositions very much, also. I'll have to look for more.

In younger days I hacked away at Debussy's Arabesque #1. (Say, maybe that's how the slang term "axe" originated for the guitar).
My favorite version for guitar is an arrangement by Minh Nguyen. However I dan't think it is a lesser known piece as there seems to be a thousand recordings, and in the comments section someone else is claiming credit for the transcription... so I won't post it. But if you've not familiar it's worth a listen.

This arabesque is composed and played by Antoine Boyer, so I think its OK to post here. He plays several pieces by Scarlatti but have copyright concerns. He does a version of Scarlatti sonatas #545 and 113 you should hear.


musicbyandy
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by musicbyandy » Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:47 pm


ChristianSchwengeler
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by ChristianSchwengeler » Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:23 am

David Gutowski wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 6:09 am
Wonderful playing!
Thanks for posting.
David
Thank you for the comment! I think it is a composition for his 3 daughters, I like it a lot too.
Marshall Dixon wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:07 pm

This arabesque is composed and played by Antoine Boyer, so I think its OK to post here. He plays several pieces by Scarlatti but have copyright concerns. He does a version of Scarlatti sonatas #545 and 113 you should hear.
Hi Marshall, thank you for the video, he is an interessting player and I have heard other pieces on the tube before and I like it a lot. No problem with Scarlatti, you can post them, as long that hte videos are from his own chanel
musicbyandy wrote:
Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:47 pm
Thank you for sharing! Is that you on the guitar?

musicbyandy
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by musicbyandy » Mon Apr 22, 2019 5:44 pm

ChristianSchwengeler wrote:
Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:23 am
David Gutowski wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 6:09 am
Wonderful playing!
Thanks for posting.
David
Thank you for the comment! I think it is a composition for his 3 daughters, I like it a lot too.
Marshall Dixon wrote:
Wed Apr 17, 2019 3:07 pm

This arabesque is composed and played by Antoine Boyer, so I think its OK to post here. He plays several pieces by Scarlatti but have copyright concerns. He does a version of Scarlatti sonatas #545 and 113 you should hear.
Hi Marshall, thank you for the video, he is an interessting player and I have heard other pieces on the tube before and I like it a lot. No problem with Scarlatti, you can post them, as long that hte videos are from his own chanel
musicbyandy wrote:
Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:47 pm
Thank you for sharing! Is that you on the guitar?
You're welcome, that is not me on the guitar.

Marshall Dixon
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Re: Videos of lesser known pieces and Transcriptions

Post by Marshall Dixon » Sat Apr 27, 2019 3:54 pm

ChristianSchwengeler wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 6:10 pm
So here we go again. This is a transcription of an other piece of the same composer, Carlos Seixas. Originally for Harpiscord. I find that the Harpiscord music sounds much better on the guitar!
There is something that I really love about the harpsichord; namely transcriptions for guitar. Both instruments are plucked, but the guitar being plucked by the fingers gives the music a certain "touch" of expression that I miss with the harpsichord.

I just heard Rebecca Oliveira play her transcription of Seixas' sonata #37 and was again taken in by her mystical performance. I was going to post that but in looking over the thread see that you posted this sonata in your very first message. That video has been removed since I came in and I overlooked it.

Instead, here is Antoine Boyer playing Scarlatti's sonata 113 (from his you tube channel, so I think OK to post):


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