Ring finger stronger than index? For free strokes

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Sebastian
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Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 6:41 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: Ring finger stronger than index? For free strokes

Post by Sebastian » Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:24 am

robert e wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:46 am
Sebastian wrote:
Fri May 31, 2019 9:50 pm

ring-middle combination is just stronger, and has more "power" than m-i. Specially the ring finger. Sometimes I prefer using it for, say, the first note of a melody (which is naturally accentuated by rhythm). But by no means ring-middle is faster than middle-index.
I just noticed many times I avoided using middle-index finger because one professor many years ago told me to "also play with ring-middle as it is <harder>". Apparently I exaggerated what he told me (then I changed to other professors and thus lost touch with his instruction) and continued using ring-middle almost exclusively when possible.
So about June 2017 I decided to focus a lot more on index-middle.

I asked, because I wondered if the ring finger (being "stronger" than the other fingers) was either because one of my anatomic traits, or beacuse I developed it more than index finger, or if it was stronger generally in all humans.. or if it is a sum of all or most of these factors.
. Believe it or not, my preferred alteration is i-a; not for reasons of volume or tone, but because of ease and smoothness--anything involving m gets messy.


Well actually i-a alternation is not that weird at all. I find it the fastest combination (as both fingers are not adjacent). Two of my former masters, Victor Villadangos and Carlos Groisman, also implied their preference for ring-index combination as the fastest, also recommending it.
V. Villadangos uses p-a-i-p-a-i for Asturias (Segovia arrangement) in the part of the "pseudo-tremolo" (the part with sixtuplets, I don't know if that is the english term). I've been forcing myself to use p-m-i-p-m-i for that part (because it is written that way in the score and to force myself as an excercise) but now I'm accepting p-a-i-p-a-i or even maybe p-i-a-p-i-a as a very good alternatives.

Also curiosity but may also add up: I think McAllister doesn't have a big part of the tip of the medium finger and so he doesn't use it too much, if I recall correctly, or sometimes doesn't even use it, so instead uses ring-index.
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robert e
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Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2015 6:49 pm

Re: Ring finger stronger than index? For free strokes

Post by robert e » Sat Jun 01, 2019 2:30 pm

Sebastian wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:24 am
robert e wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 3:46 am
. Believe it or not, my preferred alteration is i-a; not for reasons of volume or tone, but because of ease and smoothness--anything involving m gets messy.
Well actually i-a alternation is not that weird at all. I find it the fastest combination (as both fingers are not adjacent). Two of my former masters, Victor Villadangos and Carlos Groisman, also implied their preference for ring-index combination as the fastest, also recommending it.
V. Villadangos uses p-a-i-p-a-i for Asturias (Segovia arrangement) in the part of the "pseudo-tremolo" (the part with sixtuplets, I don't know if that is the english term). I've been forcing myself to use p-m-i-p-m-i for that part (because it is written that way in the score and to force myself as an excercise) but now I'm accepting p-a-i-p-a-i or even maybe p-i-a-p-i-a as a very good alternatives.

Also curiosity but may also add up: I think McAllister doesn't have a big part of the tip of the medium finger and so he doesn't use it too much, if I recall correctly, or sometimes doesn't even use it, so instead uses ring-index.
Interesting and encouraging--Thanks! Yes, I've struggled with whether to try and retrain/rehabilitate the m combinations or simply abandon it altogether and move on. And, yes, Matthew McAllister is an inspiration. I don't think he ever uses m--doesn't seem to hold him back much, if at all.

The i-a may be easier too because they are more similar in length (I think Christopher Berg mentioned that in his method.)

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