How did Aguado's support work?

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
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Tonyyyyy
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How did Aguado's support work?

Post by Tonyyyyy » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:29 pm

I know about how Gitano and Ergoplay work But how did the Aguado tripodium hold its guitar? Maybe the small print explains it, but it looks precarious.
xtripodion.jpg.pagespeed.ic.9QnlHPcBCn.jpg
And has anyone used it (or a recreation of it ) in living memory
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Scot Tremblay
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Re: How did Aguado's support work?

Post by Scot Tremblay » Tue Nov 10, 2015 1:23 am

Here is some information on the contraption....I played on an original Lacote attached to a reproduction tripodium a few years back. I think it would take some getting used to and to tell the truth, I really didn't think it made any noticeable difference to the sound or volume of the guitar. Scherzer had a better solution for removing the damping effects from the players body, which was a double back instrument (a second back to the guitar which kept the instrument away from the players body). The down side with that it adds a fair bit of work for the luthier thus making for a more expensive instrument...but then a tripdium would be costly too...it's all a trade off, I guess.

http://www.sinier-de-ridder.com/pdf/sin ... aguado.pdf
Scot Tremblay Guitars

"One picture is worth a thousand words. So, for me, one good note put where it should be put, will say what it will take some people many notes to say. ~B.B. King, 1986

Stephen Lee

Re: How did Aguado's support work?

Post by Stephen Lee » Tue Nov 10, 2015 1:40 am

I hope this one will help
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Di ... Aguado.jpg

Regarding this monstrous support, I have tried one support in same principle as this, based on ground and clamps lower side of guitar, but differ on supporting position. The one I tried is monstrous support with supporting pole placed on space between player's thighs, as opposed to Aguado's (pole on right side of player's right leg).

Unfortunately, disadvantages are their size makes difficulties for carrying, take more time to adjust, and they don't allow guitar position changes for temporary time while player is currently playing.

Lovemyguitar
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Re: How did Aguado's support work?

Post by Lovemyguitar » Tue Nov 10, 2015 2:40 am

Scot Tremblay wrote:...I think it would take some getting used to and to tell the truth, I really didn't think it made any noticeable difference to the sound or volume of the guitar. ...
According to Julian Bream in his Guitarra documentary, the point of the tripodium was not related to sound or volume, rather, the idea was to allow the player complete freedom of movement with both hands/arms (allowing for more technical prowess), since one is not impeded by having to hold the instrument.

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Mogenson
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Re: How did Aguado's support work?

Post by Mogenson » Tue Nov 10, 2015 2:54 am

I recall reading somewhere that this device used a long metal pin than went right through the guitar and into the neck even. The guitar probably had to be modified to accommodate it. I think it was probably pretty effective, but the tripod would have to be pretty heavy I think for this type of support to work... I wish they made these today! Somewhere in Brian Jeffery's book on Fernando Sor, I think it says that Sor tried Aguado's device and liked it. It does seem to put the guitar in the same central position described in Sor's method.

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