Sitting Position, crossleg vs foot rest

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
tbgttt

Sitting Position, crossleg vs foot rest

Post by tbgttt » Tue Oct 31, 2006 11:27 am

I'm a very new beginner (6 weeks) and find that I prefer sitting crosslegged as opposed to using a foot rest. I also find that I'm more comfortable with right leg over left, whereas everything I read says it should be left over right.

Am I making a mistake here? Is this really a big deal? Should I force myself to learn with a foot rest?

tbgttt

guitarstudent

Post by guitarstudent » Tue Oct 31, 2006 3:37 pm

sounds like you have adopted Paco De Lucia's position. Are you sure you are not a flamenco player?

Nick1411

Post by Nick1411 » Tue Oct 31, 2006 4:43 pm

I don't know if this is helpful or not, but when I started CG I started playing with the guitar resting on my right leg and the next in front of me. This was a result of amateur steel string playing for so long.

It was difficult for me at first to adopt a more standard posture. It felt kinda weird having my left arm out so far to the side and it definately felt strange having my foot up on a stool. How am I supposed to stand up and rock the crowd in this manner?? :D

I stuck with it and after a while (a month or two) it felt very normal and comfortable. I really prefer playing this way now and play my steel string this way most of the time as well.

I'll let someone else get into the details of Why or Why Not because there are a lot more experienced people out there than me, but I typically take a "Do it the way all the masters recommend it unless you've got a good educated reason not to." I guess if you are learning and comfortable, not causing any pain, and its not hampering your ability, then go ahead.

Although I read somewhere that bad technique may not cause problems right away and the determintal effects may not show up until much further along, when its harder to fix.

For what its worth,

Nick

tbgttt

Post by tbgttt » Tue Oct 31, 2006 5:25 pm

guitarstudent:
No, not a Flamenco player (yet), but am a fan of Paco De Lucia. Interesting to hear that a real Pro uses that position.

tbgttt

tbgttt

Post by tbgttt » Tue Oct 31, 2006 5:30 pm

Nick:
Of course your right... there has to be very valid reasons the "Masters" do it that way. I'll keep working at it and perhaps like you I'll become more comfortable with it as time goes by.

tbgttt

Nick1411

Post by Nick1411 » Tue Oct 31, 2006 5:32 pm

And if it doesn't work for you and you go back to using your original position, maybe you'll be one of those masters that drives all the other masters nuts, as well as provide ample fodder for forum discussions. :)

Good luck!

tbgttt

Post by tbgttt » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:06 pm

Nick:

Good idea... I've been a keyboard player all my adult life and am often accused of driving guitar players nuts.

I'm totally new to Classical Guitar... never even held one until a couple of months ago when I inherited a nice Takamine from a studio client who couldn't pay his bill. Instantly fell in love, and have been trying to absorb everything I can find about CG.

This forum is a Goldmine. Came across it last night and immediately signed up... then spent the next six hours or so reading every topic and reply I could access. I had no idea there were so many ways to hold, finger, and pick a guitar!

Thanks for your replies and the "Good Luck"

tbgttt

Azalais

Post by Azalais » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:27 pm

I've worn short skirts all my life... so sitting cross-legged with my lower back slightly arched feels far more natural and balanced to me... I play guitar with my right leg crossed over my left and use a gitano support. The guitar neck is slightly forward, the lower bout/sound board are in line with my right forearm (wrist straight), closer to my body... my shoulders stay level, and I don't have to twist my back around to the left. I do need to remind myself NOT to slouch or lean over the guitar.

(I play the lute with a neck strap and a strap that I sit on, and sometimes cross my left leg over my right, unless I am sitting on a very low seat. I can actually use the back of the chair for support, which is MUCH more comfortable)

kfisherx

Post by kfisherx » Tue Oct 31, 2006 6:42 pm

The answer to your question really relies on where you want to go with the CG. Chances are great that you have a whole lot of issues with your sitting position and the way you hold the CG given the information you have given. Since this is really foundational to everything you do on the classical guitar than issues in this foundation will creep into everything you do. In other words you will limit your potential. If all you really aspire to do is to play nice simple pieces then this probably is just fine as you will most likely be able to do this just fine no matter how you sit. If, however, you have a goal to do the best that you can do without limiting yourself due to bad technique then I would suggest that you get more advise about your sitting position from a qualified and competent instructor.

Blossom

Post by Blossom » Tue Oct 31, 2006 11:46 pm

Interesting topic, I have never tried playing with my legs crossed over, I just have the guitar resting on my right leg, but then I never wear skirts :wink:

I just got myself a footstool as I found my left foot on tiptoes all the time whilst playing to make up for the height difference. The footstool will take care of that habit. :D

Blossom

Hybrid

Post by Hybrid » Wed Nov 01, 2006 12:58 am

I play on the right leg. Sometimes, its not even raised.

Been doing it all my life, and it hasnt hurt me, or stunted my playing
in any shape or form.

Not saying it works for everybody. But it can work.

And if you think my sitting position is way off, you should see
my right hand. :lol:
Its bordering on sacreligeous. :twisted:

Still doesnt stop me though. :)
H

Blossom

Post by Blossom » Wed Nov 01, 2006 10:42 pm

Blossom wrote:Interesting topic, I have never tried playing with my legs crossed over, I just have the guitar resting on my right leg, but then I never wear skirts :wink:

I just got myself a footstool as I found my left foot on tiptoes all the time whilst playing to make up for the height difference. The footstool will take care of that habit. :D

Blossom
Duh! :shock: I meant to say the guitar is resting on my left leg...not my right leg :oops: :roll:

Blossom

User avatar
owl
Posts: 10124
Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2005 10:35 am
Location: Australia

Post by owl » Wed Nov 01, 2006 11:14 pm

Blossom wrote: Duh! :shock: I meant to say the guitar is resting on my left leg...not my right leg :oops: :roll:
LOL Blossom... I'm glad you clarified that statement :wink: ...................
I was just about to fly in and say :shock: WHAAAT!!!?

Owl
Never, ever give up!... I leave my songprint on your heart.

stageseven

Post by stageseven » Wed Nov 01, 2006 11:25 pm

I know I was in the same position (no pun intended) when I first started playing tbgttt. I found that playing with a footstool eventually helped me to keep my left wrist straight while playing. With my wrist bent I had a lot more tension in my hand, and this made playing harder and more uncomfortable.

Luis_Br
Posts: 2238
Joined: Sun Apr 23, 2006 2:50 pm
Location: Brazil

Post by Luis_Br » Wed Nov 01, 2006 11:53 pm

I think you need to search the best position to you. As mentioned by our friends, a teacher is very important.

I like a more vertical position. I've noticed this is a kind of modern tendency. But I had to 'bend' my right hand up in order to maintain the same attack in angle and achieving the good sonority I had on the more horizontal position. I use footstool and a dynarette. Something like this:
Image

But unconventional position might work. Just be careful with your health. A curved back is a big problem in the near future. But Ricardo Gallén, for example, is a great virtuso of the classical guitar and his position is on the right leg:
Image
Image

PS.: All pictures are from original websites:
Raphaella Smits - http://www.rsmits.com
Ricardo Gallen - http://www.ricardogallen.com

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