Left hand, Ring finger problem

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
easygoingchap

Left hand, Ring finger problem

Post by easygoingchap » Thu May 01, 2008 1:03 am

I think I have an anatomical problem with my left ring finger. The tip of my ring finger (distal interphalangeal joint) cannot hyperextend to press 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings at the same time while leaving the 1st string free (as in holding C barred chord in 3rd position). Does anybody have similar problem? Any suggestion will be much appreciated.

GEO

Re: Left hand, Ring finger problem

Post by GEO » Thu May 01, 2008 1:38 am

If I understood your problem, EasyGoingChap, are you sure that your LH palm is held pretty much parallel with the edge of the guitar neck? Many folks, myself included, have a tendency to turn or "pronate" the LH wrist so that the 2,3 and 4 fingers loose the ability to extend as far up the fingerboard as they otherwise should.

Cheers,

geo

easygoingchap

Re: Left hand, Ring finger problem

Post by easygoingchap » Sat May 17, 2008 10:03 am

Thanks Geo,

I do have the tendency to pronate the LH I admit. But I use the correct way (standard position) every now and then (whenever I feel serious). It does not make a difference as to my ring finger problem. I feel like I am disabled (something wrong with me anatomically).

Cheers,

Easygoingchap

gregvet

Re: Left hand, Ring finger problem

Post by gregvet » Sat May 17, 2008 6:26 pm

easygoingchap wrote:I think I have an anatomical problem with my left ring finger. The tip of my ring finger (distal interphalangeal joint) cannot hyperextend to press 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings at the same time while leaving the 1st string free (as in holding C barred chord in 3rd position). Does anybody have similar problem? Any suggestion will be much appreciated.
Hi easygoingchap, If I understand your problem, are you trying to press the 2,3 and 4th strings with your 3rd finger simultaneously while keeping the first string open? That type of barring is not usual in CG. The fingering would be better served with using the 1,2 and 3rd or 2,3 and 4th fingers. Typically a barred C chord would entail the first finger as the barre while the 2,3 and 4th fingers are pressing down on the necessary strings.

Azalais

Re: Left hand, Ring finger problem

Post by Azalais » Sat May 17, 2008 9:15 pm

This is another one of those cases where a picture is worth three paragraphs of explanation :oops:

Try this experiment... (be sure to file your left hand fingernails first):

- Let the neck of the guitar rest in the middle of your left palm so the big crease is in line with the edge fret board... (Keep your thumb relaxed and out of the picture for now.)

- Touch the 5th or 6th string/third fret node with the tip of your ring finger. It will be coming down almost perpendicular to the string in a nice rounded arch... (and your index and little fingers will feel free to move independently, and your ring finger will be clear of the open strings)

- Holding your ring finger where it is, reach back your index finger, curling it back to the 1st string/1st fret. (try it with your middle finger and little finger too) Your hand will lift slightly, but it should stay high and close in to the neck)

Now adjust your sitting position so that your ring finger always stays in that nice powerful high rounded high arched position :P and then let your thumb gently touch the back of the neck... (remember to let your elbow move forward so you don't ever let your wrist collapse)

If your ring finger is too low and flat, it will NEVER have enough strength to fret (or lift off) the bass notes properly, (mine actually LOCKS up) and you will make nasty squeaks when you try to haul it off the string. Move your whole hand in closer and higher, and you'll be able to maintain that more rounded finger shape. (Try hammering on and pulling off that bass note now... it works!!) With practice, you'll even be able to fret the 6th string with your little finger :shock:

Hope that helps a little bit.

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