Knuckle - Joint pain

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
jimbo

Knuckle - Joint pain

Post by jimbo » Sat Apr 01, 2006 12:15 am

Hi everyone,

I have recently been getting pain in my RH knuckles and joints, to the extent that the pain wakes me up at night. Sometimes my (a) finger feels almost dead.
Can anybody please give their opinion? Are there any RH procedures I could do? etc............

Thanks

J

BFGuitar

Post by BFGuitar » Sat Apr 01, 2006 12:17 am

Look on the internet for special fish oils and stuff for joints.

Other than that i cant help you.

Btw can it be arthritis?

hav

Post by hav » Sat Apr 01, 2006 3:29 am

mmm - jimbo, the only time I've experienced actual numbness in a finger or hand, I had my back out of whack --- do you have a bad crick or have you tristed your back recently. I'm sure other things could cause the soreness and numbness you are experiencing but just a thought.

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owl
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Re: Knuckle - Joint pain

Post by owl » Sat Apr 01, 2006 6:18 am

jimbo wrote: Can anybody please give their opinion?
Yes Jimbo... rest for a couple of days... if it improves begin playing again.
If the pain returns... SEE A DOCTOR!!! :shock:
If it doesn't improve after rest... SEE A DOCTOR!!! :shock:

Owl
Never, ever give up!... I leave my songprint on your heart.

jc_koto

Post by jc_koto » Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:00 am

I agree completely with owl.

Try laying off the guitar for a couple days. If the pain DOES stop, or is at least greatly reduced, then my best guess is that either you are overworking your RH or perhaps you have improper RH technique or even bad posture. I recently had this problem and someone here suggested adjusting my playing habits, which helped dramatically.

If the pain DOES NOT stop after a couple of days, then definately see a doctor. You might have some kind of injury that could potentially lead to permanant diminished use of that hand.

Arthritis or a crick in the ol' spine (or even elbow) are certainly other things to consider.

Best of luck!

joshuamurphy75

Post by joshuamurphy75 » Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:53 am

I think it is definitly worth your time to check with a doctor. my sister, a pianist, ended up getting carpal tunnel syndrom without even knowing it.

jimbo

Post by jimbo » Wed May 10, 2006 9:49 pm

Thanks for your help guys.

I went to see the Doctor and he said I have 'Trigger finger' He is going to try and inject steroids into my hand. Has anybody got any expeience or knowledge of this?

I hope it does'nt stop me playing (my family hope otherwise)

thanks for looking

chouette

pain and douleurs

Post by chouette » Thu May 11, 2006 1:13 am

I actually use a simple elastic wrist band about 2" [5 cm] Wide .
It does not impede your playing and the pain is gone.
Chouette

Rick714

Post by Rick714 » Thu May 11, 2006 3:16 am

Rest and see. If it persists, definitely seek medical attention. It could be carpal tunnell or some other form of repetitive stress injury (affectionately known as RPI). You should google carpal tunnell and rpi with the word guitar in your search. You'll learn alot about it. Unfortunately you're not alone. Good luck to you.

wayne

Post by wayne » Fri May 12, 2006 4:03 am

hi jimbo. To me playing cg requires a very delicate touch. (like a girly touch, witch explanes why weman sound more like weman when they play cg) I would like all to tense your hands and shake them. then loosen your hands and do the same, witch movement is easyer

ps dose all that make scence :oops: lol

hfergani

Post by hfergani » Fri May 12, 2006 4:15 am

Jimbo

If your doctor says you have trigger finger then the steroid injections should help. I think you will only have to stop playing for a few days. I have not had this problem personally but I have seen people who have it although none of them were cg players.

BTW, do your fingers snap when they are flexed and you try to straighten them?

Robm

Post by Robm » Sun May 14, 2006 11:48 am

Try Mangosteen juice, it really helps inflamation - and reduces the need for medication.

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