Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
Brian Powell

Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by Brian Powell » Tue Oct 06, 2015 12:45 am

A run of barre chords are especially tough on my L hand arthritis, so I'm in the market for a guitar that is the easiest to play. Please lend your experience if you have played any of these models, or if you know of another model that is extremely easy to play.

Cervantes Milenia - 650mm, 52mm, radiused fingerboard, jumbo frets

Cervantes Crossover 1 - 650mm, 48mm, radiused fingerboard

Kenny Hill Player - 640mm, 50mm

Raimundo Bossa Nova - 640mm, 50mm, designed for lower action

Esteve 7sR - 640mm, 50mm

Saez-Marin G90 - 640mm, 50mm

celestemcc
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Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 5:43 pm

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by celestemcc » Tue Oct 06, 2015 10:33 pm

Not knowing any of them, I'd still recommend the 640s with radiused fingerboards. Every hand is different, but I have barre problems too. The radius makes quite a difference. The Raimundo might be my first pick... sight unseen. Have you played any of them?
2015 Connor spruce/Indian rosewood
1978 Ramirez 1a cedar

Brian Powell

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by Brian Powell » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:22 am

I just played the Crossover 1 and the Milenia. As I suspected, the 48mm was too narrow. My RH fingers kept bumping each other. The Milenia was comfortable to play, but not $2000 comfortable and honestly not that much better of a sound than my La Patrie Collection which I was playing there as well. Maybe it's because the Milenia was an Estudio series?
I have been looking, and cannot find any sound clips of the Bossa Nova 2 or 3 and can't find one or even a Kenny Hill Player 640 in my area. The sound clips on Savage for the Hill are messed up and I don't see anything on youtub e.
I did find a 2010 Cervantes "Rodriguez" Signature series which I'm going to play tomorrow. I believe it has the larger frets (like almost all Cervantes seem to) and the action is nice and low. This one seems like it would be a leap in quality of sound compared to these other ones I've mentioned. I can't find original pricing on it, so what would be a good deal for one of these?

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James Lister
Luthier
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 3:53 pm
Location: Sheffield, UK

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by James Lister » Wed Oct 07, 2015 10:55 am

I've no experience of any of those guitars, but I'd second the recommendation to go with a radiussed fingerboard. It certainly makes barres a bit more comfortable for me.

James
James Lister, luthier, Sheffield UK

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petermc61
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Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by petermc61 » Wed Oct 07, 2015 11:12 am

For a start, use low tension strings which will make things easier. Your sound may well improve too, certainly your vibrato will.

celestemcc
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Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by celestemcc » Wed Oct 07, 2015 7:32 pm

Low tension strings will feel even softer, or may buzz, on a shorter scale, though... yes, for your current guitar, but once you go to 640 or lower, you may actually need higher tension strings. Such has been my experience.

I recently played a Kenny Hill 640 for a short time: it sounded lovely. Don't know which model.
2015 Connor spruce/Indian rosewood
1978 Ramirez 1a cedar

celestemcc
Posts: 1301
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 5:43 pm

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by celestemcc » Wed Oct 07, 2015 7:33 pm

Also, have you looked into the market for used guitars? Not many short scale instruments out there, but worth a try.
2015 Connor spruce/Indian rosewood
1978 Ramirez 1a cedar

Brian Powell

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by Brian Powell » Thu Oct 08, 2015 12:31 pm

I pulled the trigger on the Cervantes! It blew me away. The deep rolling bases, the separation, and singing trebles. . And the subject of this topic, yes it was very comfortable to play. Fretboard felt like it had a very small radius, and the larger frets make it easier to bar too. He had hard tension d'addarios on it. Here's the info on it, think I got a good deal
Cervantes Rodriguez Signature model. Cedar top, cocobolo back and sides. Fishman Matrix Infinity pickup system installed. Guitar does have some scratches on the top. They do not go through the finish. Otherwise it is excellent condition. Plays and sounds great. Protege HumiCase included.
$1699.00 No trades of any kind. Local sale only. Low ball offers will be ignored.

ronjazz
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Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2011 11:10 pm

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by ronjazz » Fri Oct 09, 2015 1:47 am

Cervantes guitars are great values.
Lester Devoe Flamenco Negra
Lester Devoe Flamenco Blanca
Aparicio Flamenco Blanca with RMC pickup
Bartolex 7-string with RMC pickup
Giannini 7-string with Shadow pickup
Sal Pace 7-string archtop

Model_33

Re: Which of these is the most ergonomic guitar?

Post by Model_33 » Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:38 am

I have a Cervantes Milennia. No radial fretboard though. Are you sure about that? I didn't think it was an option unless perhaps a Signature. I've had mine not quite 6 mos.. Curiously, it is not the easiest guitar that I have played. I can't wrap my head around as to why exactly. I also have a Cervantes Hauser PE, which is a gem -- same jumbo frets. For some reason, I seem to tire more easily on the Milenia. The action average on the high side (4mm@6th) but no room to lower without shaving down the bridge saddle trap; which I am not brave enough to do. String height 6th string @ 1st fret is over 1mm which is high but I can't lower that either. It may just be that I didn't get one of Sig. Cervantes best Milenia guitars. That being said, I am glad to have the Milenia even if it does tire me out as quickly as a 664 scale instrument.

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