Playing Live in the Y2K

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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AndreiKrylov

Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by AndreiKrylov » Sun Mar 11, 2018 8:51 pm

Rognvald wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 5:16 pm
we can not turn train of modern civilization backwards .. the only thing possible for any craft to survive and grow in new conditions is to have wider appeal, but ...because of extremely conservative nature and many taboos, rules and laws regulating existence of this craft it does not look that it could grow its appeal. Andrei K

Andrei,
I agree with the first part of your statement that we cannot turn modern civilization backward but disagree with your reasoning concerning the effects of conservatisim, taboos, rules, etc. as its primal cause(?) It is not because of conservatism, taboos and rules that Classical Music and serious Jazz are in decline but rather that the values needed to promote and grow these Art forms in the future are at odds with 21st Century Materialism as preached overtly and subliminally in movies, TV, videos, magazines and taught in our homes and schools. And, the decline of educational standards we have witnessed in the last 60 years in public education(especially here in the US) and the exclusion of a balanced educational curriculum that includes Music, Art and Literature are endemic and perhaps irreversible. The Arts have traditionally struggled in the scope of the development of our Western Civilization but the numbers of Liberal Arts students nationwide has fallen dramatically in both primary, secondary and university curriculums as compared with the recent past. And, these trends are not likely to be reversed since not only performance opportunities for serious music have declined but the results of the lack of exposure to serious Music and Art have created an environment where the term "Artist" is used for Psycho-Pop Painters, dime store novelists and three-chord guitarists who make millions from the humble, uneducated masses. Perhaps, the saddest example, for me, is that the Sixties charlatan, Dylan, received the Nobel Prize for Literature in the shadow of Solzhenitsyn, Satre, Steinbeck, Camus, Hemingway, Churchill, Faulkner, Eliot, Hesse, Mann, Shaw, Yeats, Rolland . . . excuse me dear reader but I think I'm testing the limit of civility. Playing again . . . Rognvald O.K. I guess I can't stop. Here are some of the profound lyrics by the Nobel Laureate . . . . How is it possible to write such profound lines?


"Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" (The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, 1963)

I ain't a-saying you treated me unkind
You could have done better but I don't mind
You just kinda wasted my precious time
But don't think twice, it's all right

Now, that's a Nobel Prize-winning author!
Thanks for your answer, Rongvald!
No reasoning really from me, just observations...

Decline of Education..?
What is education? Is it set of rules and laws promoted and implanted into students by certain institutions?
Then... weren't there times in history of our civilization Teachers taught to pupils mostly irrational nonsense?
What is a value of such education if it will teach you how to operate in the system while system completely changed and these sets of rules became outdated...?
Isn't the best education possible in time and place there most amount of scientifically proven and rational information regarding certain subject is available?
Isn't it NOW? When as much useful information been available in our human history if not now?

Therefore it is not really educational problem, unless educational institutions itself going to ignore rational approaches and continue to promote outdated information.

Was there the Love of majority of humans to so called "serious art"? Gone?
When did it happen? Did it ever happened?
likely not... Even the best "mass Education " will only work to certain degree... and it will be naive to expect that somehow it is possible to widely implant in our collective psyche "love to "serious art"...

Possibilities to performance? Possibilities of exposure of people to "serious Art" ?
- almost limitless now! as never before...
via Internet.
never before was possible to reach such giant audiences ...

Coming back to your original point:
Is it really decline in quantity of classical guitar concerts and gigs in the Y2K?
Probably not.
BUT.. never before were so many PERFORMERS who play and want to play....
But There are probably appr. same amount of listeners and same amount of gigs,
but classical guitarists - Performers...?
- probably at least 100 times more performers than it was in the middle of last century...
and when you divide gigs on performers.. it is so much less than before...

But ...Maybe "classical guitar" in the area of performance has to change a little?
Why not let players play more freely? make new unusual interpretations?
bring more original music?
Make beautiful variations on certain pop-melodies?
Permit performers be more mobile - walk on stage if they wish?
Make more of musical theater?
Bring lighting? Presentations, video in performance?
Use more electronics freely?

isn't Performance a synthetic art? isn't it a theater?
well when why this kind of theater is so strict and puritan?
and if we do not like or do not want theater ...then
why we are such hypocrites about it? - then remove theater completely.

make concert in total darkness there not performer, nor listeners visible.
Leave just music/audio alone.

But if it is Theater/performance ? - then why this performance is so poor in performing /show aspects? Why it is so strict?
Set it free! bring all kind of power and possibilities of modern performance in it - and likely it will be popular...

But NO, NO, NO!
We do not want anything... no changes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
.. we will just blame others for our "problems"...
How dare they are to use lighting, presentations, costumes, freely moving on stage!!!!!!!
We are real!!! We are interesting!!!

but there is audience....oops?
where it goes?
Aha!!!
Oh this immoral audience!!!! :)

Rognvald
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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by Rognvald » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:12 pm

Thanks for your reply, Andrei,
There is much in what you have said with which I do not agree but it is not the purpose of this thread to tally pros and cons for the discussion but rather to flesh out ideas from our members . . . especially those who are performers. So, thanks for your response. However, I just returned this afternoon from a concert at 3 p.m. by the Avalon String Quartet--the quartet in residence at Northern Illinois University. They played at the Listening Room in Crystal Lake in McHenry County, Illinois--population 307K. I was the first to arrive ten minutes before the concert. By 3:15 p.m.--15 minutes after they were scheduled to play, 9 additional persons arrived. The room has a capacity of 120. They played Grieg and Beethoven quartets and were fine, polished professional musicians. I enjoyed the concert. Last year, I went to hear violinist Rachel Barton Pine at the same venue and there was a similar sized audience. However, when they have comedy acts, paranormal shows, blues bands or magicians, they play to a packed crowd. If you were the booking agent for this venue, how long would you continue to book classical musicians if you needed to meet a bottom line? Playing live in the Y2K? How 'bout a Bob Dylan(Nobel Prize Winner) tribute band? Cool man, real cool . . . . Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

AndreiKrylov

Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by AndreiKrylov » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:34 pm

Rognvald wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:12 pm
Thanks for your reply, Andrei,
There is much in what you have said with which I do not agree but it is not the purpose of this thread to tally pros and cons for the discussion but rather to flesh out ideas from our members . . . especially those who are performers. So, thanks for your response. However, I just returned this afternoon from a concert at 3 p.m. by the Avalon String Quartet--the quartet in residence at Northern Illinois University. They played at the Listening Room in Crystal Lake in McHenry County, Illinois--population 307K. I was the first to arrive ten minutes before the concert. By 3:15 p.m.--15 minutes after they were scheduled to play, 9 additional persons arrived. The room has a capacity of 120. They played Grieg and Beethoven quartets and were fine, polished professional musicians. I enjoyed the concert. Last year, I went to hear violinist Rachel Barton Pine at the same venue and there was a similar sized audience. However, when they have comedy acts, paranormal shows, blues bands or magicians, they play to a packed crowd. If you were the booking agent for this venue, how long would you continue to book classical musicians if you needed to meet a bottom line? Playing live in the Y2K? How 'bout a Bob Dylan(Nobel Prize Winner) tribute band? Cool man, real cool . . . . Playing again . . . Rognvald
Thanks for interesting post!
Only 2 solutions possible in this:
1. No performance at all. No visual aspect. Complete darkness. Just sound.
2. If first not accepted - then unleash all possibilities and power of modern performance. Bring PR too.

something in the middle - visual but no use of modern stuff? - then just a very few are interested.

You want to bring more people? - bring power of performance!
or ...deny it completely. Darkness. only sound.

Do not blame the audience. It is a fault of presentation.
and you confirms it by your observation - " when they have comedy acts, paranormal shows, blues bands or magicians, they play to a packed crowd."

as you wrote "it is 21st century", yet we want the same performance with even less theater than in 18th century...
and
it does not work...

Do not blame the audience.
Would you blame weather or you will put suitable for it clothes and shoes?

quote from Tom Poore:
"By the way, a player who believes only music professors and critics care about musicianship is a player with too little respect for his or her listeners. A foundational pillar of great playing is respect for one’s audience. One reason some players become great is because they believe there are listeners worthy of their best effort."

Rognvald
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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by Rognvald » Mon Mar 12, 2018 12:40 am

Do not blame the audience. It is a fault of presentation.
and you confirms it by your observation - " when they have comedy acts, paranormal shows, blues bands or magicians, they play to a packed crowd." Andrei K.

Andrei,
Perhaps they should do some stand-up comedy or magic between the adagio and allegro movements in the Beethoven Sonata? Let's see . . . "Did ya hear about the one where the chicken crossed the road?" Or, "pick a card . . . any card." Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

AndreiKrylov

Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by AndreiKrylov » Mon Mar 12, 2018 1:42 am

Rognvald wrote:
Mon Mar 12, 2018 12:40 am
Do not blame the audience. It is a fault of presentation.
and you confirms it by your observation - " when they have comedy acts, paranormal shows, blues bands or magicians, they play to a packed crowd." Andrei K.

Andrei,
Perhaps they should do some stand-up comedy or magic between the adagio and allegro movements in the Beethoven Sonata? Let's see . . . "Did ya hear about the one where the chicken crossed the road?" Or, "pick a card . . . any card." Playing again . . . Rognvald
no.
but they may find something else interesting and appropriate,
and they should really think about it or... they will be in trouble ...

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lagartija
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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by lagartija » Mon Mar 12, 2018 1:54 am

AndreiKrylov wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:34 pm

Thanks for interesting post!
Only 2 solutions possible in this:
1. No performance at all. No visual aspect. Complete darkness. Just sound.
2. If first not accepted - then unleash all possibilities and power of modern performance. Bring PR too.

something in the middle - visual but no use of modern stuff? - then just a very few are interested.

You want to bring more people? - bring power of performance!
or ...deny it completely. Darkness. only sound.

Do not blame the audience. It is a fault of presentation.
and you confirms it by your observation - " when they have comedy acts, paranormal shows, blues bands or magicians, they play to a packed crowd."

as you wrote "it is 21st century", yet we want the same performance with even less theater than in 18th century...
and
it does not work...

Do not blame the audience.
Would you blame weather or you will put suitable for it clothes and shoes?

quote from Tom Poore:
"By the way, a player who believes only music professors and critics care about musicianship is a player with too little respect for his or her listeners. A foundational pillar of great playing is respect for one’s audience. One reason some players become great is because they believe there are listeners worthy of their best effort."
:applauso:
I think you have nailed it on several fronts, Andrei.

Don’t blame the audience.
Don’t disrespect the audience.
If what you are doing doesn’t work, it is madness to think that doing the exact same thing will give you a different result.
:bravo:

Let me add, that I organize a classical guitar concert series. Our venue holds 150. We are selling out our performances.
I tell the performers who the audience has been for previous performances and they pick the pieces they will play. The publicity people are very experienced.
This is a relatively rural area. There are not 150 guitarists in the audience. I tell the performers that we are trying to broaden the audience for quality music played on classical guitar.
When the sun shines, bask.
__/^^^^^o>
Classical Guitar forever!

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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by CactusWren » Mon Mar 12, 2018 2:28 am

AndreiKrylov wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:42 am
CactusWren wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 8:10 pm
rojarosguitar wrote:
Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:22 pm

But, at the time of my visit the trains were already equipped with a hydraulic brake activated by the machine man. So the brakeman didn't have to do anything, actually, they just were there because the trade union had won the fight for the conservation of their jobs! Just came to my mind, when I started to reflect what it means to compare state of affairs then with now...
Are you saying that because of DJs and Muzak that a working musician is an anachronism being replaced by superior technology? I sure hope not--that is incredibly disrespectful to live music, which is not the same thing as recorded music and which creates a highly inferior experience.
it is not because of DJs and Muzak etc.
Times have changed.
New generations of people probably spending more time been present in virtual reality rather than been active in physical
one... it is just a fact.. people surrounded by it through many devices they have and everyone could see it everywhere...
This new reality takes a lot of time... including time which was spent on certain type of entertainment and sports, including classical guitar...train replaced horses.
we can not turn train of modern civilization backwards .. the only thing possible for any craft to survive and grow in new conditions is to have wider appeal, but ...because of extremely conservative nature and many taboos, rules and laws regulating existence of this craft it does not look that it could grow its appeal. Only way is to drastically change all these conservative views and make it as free as possible, only this probably will make it more relevant in new world.
But...could it happen?..
Classical music certainly is conservative (it seems inherent even in the name), but I'm not sure it would be possible to broaden its appeal much. How would one do so? Play Super Mario Brothers theme songs in concerts? As a gigging musician, I certainly admit to playing lots of pop stuff (bossa novas, rumbas, Latin American crossover) and so perhaps I am doing what you suggest. I have only gotten called for one actual classical guitar gig in my career, and I actually ended up losing that one to a better guitarist (rightfully). Although, to be honest, the room was very loud and no one could hear him, so it wasn't a successful gig in any case.

Some of you may find the following interesting. My daughter is 9, and she is addicted to her iPad. She loves to watch Youtube and various Disney shows. I hate this and have always wanted to eliminate her screen time, but it's not "politically" possible since when I'm at work I have no control over how my wife watches her. Periodically, when my daughter is behaving especially badly, we take away the iPad as punishment. This has happened three times now, and every time we are shocked by how much she improves. She is more cheerful, much more polite, seems to be happier. Over the last week, my daughter has been drawing constantly, listening to my mp3 player, playing with her toys, singing, even writing some songs on her guitar. It seems obvious that the iPad is just awfully destructive to her, and I would assume, to many if not most other people, as well.

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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by Rognvald » Mon Mar 12, 2018 2:53 am

Don’t blame the audience.
Don’t disrespect the audience.
If what you are doing doesn’t work, it is madness to think that doing the exact same thing will give you a different result. Lagartija

Lagartija,
Don't blame the audience for what?
Don't disrespect the audience in what way?
Should the Avalon String Quartet have played something other than Grieg and Beethoven? If so, what? And, why since the audience didn't know the
program beforehand?
How does one enter the mind of the audience to know what they want beforehand or spontaneously before the performance?
I really don't understand your response. Can you explain? Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

AndreiKrylov

Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by AndreiKrylov » Mon Mar 12, 2018 2:57 am

CactusWren wrote:
Mon Mar 12, 2018 2:28 am
AndreiKrylov wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:42 am
CactusWren wrote:
Sat Mar 10, 2018 8:10 pm


Are you saying that because of DJs and Muzak that a working musician is an anachronism being replaced by superior technology? I sure hope not--that is incredibly disrespectful to live music, which is not the same thing as recorded music and which creates a highly inferior experience.
it is not because of DJs and Muzak etc.
Times have changed.
New generations of people probably spending more time been present in virtual reality rather than been active in physical
one... it is just a fact.. people surrounded by it through many devices they have and everyone could see it everywhere...
This new reality takes a lot of time... including time which was spent on certain type of entertainment and sports, including classical guitar...train replaced horses.
we can not turn train of modern civilization backwards .. the only thing possible for any craft to survive and grow in new conditions is to have wider appeal, but ...because of extremely conservative nature and many taboos, rules and laws regulating existence of this craft it does not look that it could grow its appeal. Only way is to drastically change all these conservative views and make it as free as possible, only this probably will make it more relevant in new world.
But...could it happen?..
Classical music certainly is conservative (it seems inherent even in the name), but I'm not sure it would be possible to broaden its appeal much. How would one do so? Play Super Mario Brothers theme songs in concerts? As a gigging musician, I certainly admit to playing lots of pop stuff (bossa novas, rumbas, Latin American crossover) and so perhaps I am doing what you suggest. I have only gotten called for one actual classical guitar gig in my career, and I actually ended up losing that one to a better guitarist (rightfully). Although, to be honest, the room was very loud and no one could hear him, so it wasn't a successful gig in any case.

Some of you may find the following interesting. My daughter is 9, and she is addicted to her iPad. She loves to watch Youtube and various Disney shows. I hate this and have always wanted to eliminate her screen time, but it's not "politically" possible since when I'm at work I have no control over how my wife watches her. Periodically, when my daughter is behaving especially badly, we take away the iPad as punishment. This has happened three times now, and every time we are shocked by how much she improves. She is more cheerful, much more polite, seems to be happier. Over the last week, my daughter has been drawing constantly, listening to my mp3 player, playing with her toys, singing, even writing some songs on her guitar. It seems obvious that the iPad is just awfully destructive to her, and I would assume, to many if not most other people, as well.
I play a lot of jazz, bossa, flamenco etc too. I love it as well I played Renaissance, Baroque, classical etc. Love it too!
But I never played Super Mario... what is it?
Pop music - I only played nice tunes which I like.
Never played something which I dislike by request. And I refused to play for drunk or aggressive etc audience.
And never had any problem with it. I played just Bach for folks who never heard this music and they come and asked me - what is it - it is really nice, we loved it.
Very often people asked me- what kind of guitar do you play ? - and then I told them - classical guitar -many times they told me - "No way! classical guitar is so boring...and you are not boring "

Good luck with your daughter!
My boys were like that too. I tried limit they screen time (computer) when they were 9-11 etc. but ... it was only working at that age and later....they went on to experiment and try all what they could as most teenagers do...
and nothing I could limit anymore...now , when they have their own families, we have good relations, but at 12-14 they teenagers often revolt against parents ..even when they had good relations and understanding with parents before...hormones changing them :)

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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by Rick Beauregard » Mon Mar 12, 2018 3:48 am

Ok so you guys need to take a look at this guy. He is the most creative one I’ve seen at trying to recruit a new audience to CG. He is combining two passions, guitar and video games/movies/pop culture by creating CG arrangements of music ( much of it very good) from video games and movies, including Super Mario, Lord of the Rings etc. His Patreon site is helping to finance his career. And he is quite good.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
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lagartija
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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by lagartija » Mon Mar 12, 2018 2:13 pm

Rognvald wrote:
Mon Mar 12, 2018 2:53 am
Don’t blame the audience.
Don’t disrespect the audience.
If what you are doing doesn’t work, it is madness to think that doing the exact same thing will give you a different result. Lagartija

Lagartija,
Don't blame the audience for what?
Don’t blame the audience for not coming if you don’t publicize the concert adequately, including what they can expect to hear (or see if theater). Don’t blame the audience if your programming is unimaginative, and they choose another concert instead. Don’t blame the audience if you schedule your concert the same night as another popular group performance or activity.
Don't disrespect the audience in what way?
Don’t assume that the audience is ignorant about music or anything else. Don’t assume that they will not get the nuances of your performance. I once attended a First Night celebration performance of a local well-known guitarist. As he was speaking to the audience he mentioned he was going to produce a Bach CD which would come out in a few months. He had been working on the pieces diligently, but might leave out a few notes in tonight’s performance ...but none of you would probably know if I did. :shock:
That made an egregious assumption about the audience’s knowledge of Bach. I heard a rumble from the audience and some hissing. As I looked around, I recognized the concertmaster of the local symphony, other professional musicians and classical music afficionados. In my opinion, that showed his disrespect for the audience. It did no favors to the classical guitar and how guitarists are viewed by audiences. If you assume your audience is comprised of ignorant dolts, that attitude will be conveyed, even if you don’t stupidly state it out loud to them. It is your *job* as the performer to show them the beauty and structure in the music and what makes it so special. Also, what makes it special to you. If you assume that most of your audience won’t appreciate your outstanding talent and nuanced performance, maybe you should consider that the problem may be in how you are communicating with them, and not their perception. Again, don’t blame the audience...look in the mirror first.
Should the Avalon String Quartet have played something other than Grieg and Beethoven? If so, what? And, why since the audience didn't know the
program beforehand?
I can’t answer why the seats were empty at that concert, although two main reasons come to mind from my experience in concert organizing:
Insufficient publicity.
Scheduling conflict with a “better” concert or event.

I have seen both of these things happen in our local concert environment. When I first decided to start a classical guitar concert series, I decided to team up with the local experts (Fine Arts Center) rather than just winging it as was done for previous classical guitar concerts in the area. The reason is because at those concerts, I saw the same 9-25 people. The audience of 25 was when the performer had a lot of students and friends who attended. The concerts were poorly publicized...and then they were shocked that no one came. :roll:
As for scheduling conflicts, I remember well one concert that was poorly attended because it was scheduled on the same night as the Valley Light Opera performance. This is a local production that has a very large cast and nearly everyone has friends, work colleagues or family in the performance, so most people would go to that if they had to choose from more than one event. We take great care when scheduling our concerts not to choose a date that conflicts with Fine Arts Center main performances or the yearly VLO performance. Good scheduling goes a long way to filling the house.
How does one enter the mind of the audience to know what they want beforehand or spontaneously before the performance?
I really don't understand your response. Can you explain? Playing again . . . Rognvald
If you are the performer, you should ask the concert organizer what type of audience has attended in the past. At every concert we have a questionnaire we give patrons. We ask how they learned about the concert, what they thought about the performer’s performance, how easy was it to buy the tickets, what did they like or not like. This gives us a good idea who is coming to our concerts and what type of publicity is successful.
I don’t tell the performer what to play, but I tell them the range people who have been coming to the concerts and that the purpose of the series is to bring the beauty of music played on the classical guitar to a broader audience who may not be familiar with it. I figure that they are professionals and know what in their repertoire would work best in a program for that audience. So far, this has been very successful. :-D
I hope this answers your questions.
When the sun shines, bask.
__/^^^^^o>
Classical Guitar forever!

AndreiKrylov

Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by AndreiKrylov » Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:07 pm

just want to summarize my posts here:
1. it is sad if less people interested in classical music concerts
2. but rather than to blame audience for that it is necessary to look for all kind of appropriate but new and attractive ways to present this Art

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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by lucy » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:21 pm

AndreiKrylov wrote:
Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:07 pm
just want to summarize my posts here:
1. it is sad if less people interested in classical music concerts
2. but rather than to blame audience for that it is necessary to look for all kind of appropriate but new and attractive ways to present this Art
:bravo:

So glad you're still here Andrei. :)
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By being happy we sow anonymous benefits upon the world."
Robert Louis Stevenson

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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by Rognvald » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:22 pm

Don’t blame the audience for not coming if you don’t publicize the concert adequately, including what they can expect to hear (or see if theater). Don’t blame the audience if your programming is unimaginative, and they choose another concert instead. Don’t blame the audience if you schedule your concert the same night as another popular group performance or activity.
Lagartija
Thanks, L for your honest response. Some facts: the concert was promoted via their website, local newspapers, poster boards in town, signboard at the event site and community signboard. Their program was advertised beforehand. I don't know if they use radio since the local station is Rock Music. Next, would you assume Grieg or Beethoven are unimaginative? If so, perhaps they should have a public vote on what they should play? And, how would that be possible? Finally, there were no other concerts scheduled anywhere in the area at that time.

" If you assume your audience is comprised of ignorant dolts, that attitude will be conveyed, even if you don’t stupidly state it out loud to them. Lagartija" {quote}

Avalon is a professional string quartet that plays around the country. Sitting less than 15 feet from them, I could not sense any arrogance or that they considered the audience "ignorant dolts." Your example was quite unusual in my experience and the only time I ever saw disrespect for the audience was at a Miles Davis concert where he purposely turned his back on the audience when he played. I've never seen it at a classical music concert. So, let's not judge the classical world from your very extreme and unusual example.

"If you are the performer, you should ask the concert organizer what type of audience has attended in the past. Lagartija" }quote}

O.K. I told you they had magicians, clairvoyants, rockers, etc. at this venue. So, if you asked the concert organizer about previous crowds and he/she said they went wild for an Ozzie Ozbourne Tribute Band, should the Avalon String Quartet devote their concert to his music and during their performance bite a chicken's head off?

So, Lagartija, if you want to call me an elitist as some have done previously . . . that's fine since, to me, it has no pejorative connotation but rather represents a desire to continue what the "best and brightest" of our culture has created for thousands of years and some of us seek to perpetuate for future generations. If we always seek to "dumb down" our voices to reach the "masses, the common folk, the people" we are denying the past and present voices of the great painters, poets, novelists, musicians and composers who have communicated in the most profound way and have explained to generations of sentient human beings an understanding of the human condition as expressed so profoundly through their Art. Standards are difficult to maintain and easy to destroy. The turnout seen in the above-mentioned concert by the Avalon String Quartet couldn't have expressed it more eloquently. Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

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Re: Playing Live in the Y2K

Post by simonm » Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:43 pm

One thing that "Stand-Up comedians", and most audience pulling musicians and bands have in common is that they stand up. :-)

Could it be that sitting down in front of an audience suggests "boredom" and even disrespect? It is very difficult to interact with an audience from a sitting position - your movement is too limited. Sitting passively with an instrument in front of you is like putting a wall between you and the audience. Standing up the instrument is less "wall-like" and you can move enough to look alive. :-)

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