Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

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prawnheed

Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by prawnheed » Sun Sep 23, 2018 4:44 pm

It might well be that all of it is attributable to Tarrega in some way, but I have a hard time believing that it was composed as a single piece. It feels to me like a sequence of not very connected ideas strung together rather than a coherent work.

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:03 pm

Chris Delisa wrote:Gran Jota wasn't just copied from Arcas. I have the Arcas score and it's much shorter. Tarrega's jota incorporates passages from work by Jose Vinas and Luis de Soria as well.
Stephen Kenyon wrote:Is there do we know an online comparison study of this please?
It is worth stating that Tárrega himself never claimed the Jota variations as his own and that when he performed the work he could very well have included variants from several guitarists. He never sanctioned the work for print - this was undertaken by a "lively" publishing house after his death, more eager to profit from his name than to undertake a musicological investigation.

The only clue we have as to the source(s) used by the publisher is that the score was "revised" by Daniel Fortea. What does this mean? Did Fortea, like other Tárrega students, transcribe the maestro's playing directly? Did Tárrega scribble it down for him as well as he could recall? Remember, there are - for instance - several manuscript copies of Lagrima (also never sanctioned for publication), several in Tárrega's hand and all slightly different.

Some details:
I haven't verified this but according to Chanterelle, variations 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 12, 13, 16, 20 and 29 are directly lifted from Arcas as published; of course, we don't know how many Arcas actually performed (or Tárrega heard).

Other episodes are very similar but differ in minor details (as might be expected when committing to paper at a later date).

The opening of Vinas' Recuerdos de Palma is quite obviously the model for that of (let's say) Fortea's intro but again not an exact copy. More like a half remembered rendition, perhaps modified by Fortea according to his own playing?

As to Soria ... one mustn't forget that he was taught by Arcas ... and performed with Tárrega in duo. They were friends and could easily have swapped variations back and forth much as blues guitarists might do today. Either one of them laying claim to a particular riff might be seen as somewhat presumptuous.
Chris Delisa wrote:I'm going to compare the Arcas one to the Luis de Soria version.
Do you have a copy of the Juan Ayné print? I only have a modern version - be nice to see that first edition.

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Mon Sep 24, 2018 2:06 pm

Just an aside - there's a great picture of José Rojo, Juan Viñolo, Joaquin Bielsa and Luis de Soria (a dedication on the back dates it to 1900). Soria "invented" the guitarpa, an 11 stringed instrument which he appears to be holding here - I think that Soria is front-left as we look at the image.

The guitarpa was rather a flop and commented on bluntly by critics as unduly increasing the difficulty of the instrument whilst not quite being a harp - not unlike the fate of Carulli's décacord.

However Torres built at least three similar instruments: SE 07, SE 71 and SE 83 (one for Manjon no less) and the 11-string at the back looks like a dead-ringer for the Torres played by José Martínez Toboso. Note the 5/3/5 peg distrubution.
rojo__vinolo__bielsa__de_soria.png
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Crofty
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Crofty » Mon Sep 24, 2018 3:32 pm

That's how you should dress for your recitals Mark.

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:07 pm

Crofty wrote:That's how you should dress for your recitals Mark.
Funnily enough that is how I used to dress when I was playing across Europe ... errm, are we allowed to mention Europe now or will the b**xit police be at the door?

Makes me feel sick just thinking about it.

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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Crofty » Mon Sep 24, 2018 7:40 pm

Wot? Dressing up??

Chris Delisa
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Chris Delisa » Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:17 pm

Mark Clifton-Gaultier wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:03 pm
Chris Delisa wrote:Gran Jota wasn't just copied from Arcas. I have the Arcas score and it's much shorter. Tarrega's jota incorporates passages from work by Jose Vinas and Luis de Soria as well.
Stephen Kenyon wrote:Is there do we know an online comparison study of this please?
It is worth stating that Tárrega himself never claimed the Jota variations as his own and that when he performed the work he could very well have included variants from several guitarists. He never sanctioned the work for print - this was undertaken by a "lively" publishing house after his death, more eager to profit from his name than to undertake a musicological investigation.

The opening of Vinas' Recuerdos de Palma is quite obviously the model for that of (let's say) Fortea's intro but again not an exact copy. More like a half remembered rendition, perhaps modified by Fortea according to his own playing?

As to Soria ... one mustn't forget that he was taught by Arcas ... and performed with Tárrega in duo. They were friends and could easily have swapped variations back and forth much as blues guitarists might do today. Either one of them laying claim to a particular riff might be seen as somewhat presumptuous.
Chris Delisa wrote:I'm going to compare the Arcas one to the Luis de Soria version.
Do you have a copy of the Juan Ayné print? I only have a modern version - be nice to see that first edition.
I sightread the Soria one on Sunday. It features a few variations that the Arcas one has, as well as some seemingly unique ones. I suspect that both Tárrega and Soria got their variations directly from Arcas. Did he compose it from scratch? Doubt it.

There is some significant difference, though. Interestingly, Arcas breaks the I-V progression at the end and opts for a more classical-sounding finish. And the Soria piece pales in comparison to the work by the other composers. Tárrega's is the most grand and comprehensive, including several variations unknown to other pieces. It's like he took several different things he liked and combined it all.

According to the Soneto edition, Tárrega wrote 4 different versions. The intros vary slightly on each one. The Soneto edition includes a few variations not found in other manuscripts.

I just have the Soneto Ediciones book of Arcas music. I believe the jota is a fascimile of the original publication.

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Tue Sep 25, 2018 5:30 pm

Thanks for your investigation Chris.
Chris Delisa wrote:I just have the Soneto Ediciones book of Arcas music. I believe the jota is a fascimile of the original publication.
When I asked about the original Ayné edition I was refering to the Soria for which I only have a modern version.

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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Chris Delisa » Wed Sep 26, 2018 3:47 pm

Mark Clifton-Gaultier wrote:
Tue Sep 25, 2018 5:30 pm
Thanks for your investigation Chris.
Chris Delisa wrote:I just have the Soneto Ediciones book of Arcas music. I believe the jota is a fascimile of the original publication.
When I asked about the original Ayné edition I was refering to the Soria for which I only have a modern version.
Gotcha! No, I don't have that edition.

Chris Delisa
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Chris Delisa » Sat Sep 29, 2018 9:02 pm

http://guitarra.artepulsado.com/foros/s ... a%F1ola%BB.

Well, it has been announced that the score has been published. Anyone can order it online if they feel like investigating.

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Frousse
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Frousse » Mon Oct 01, 2018 1:15 pm

I love Tarrega's music. Thank you for sharing that info.

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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by amade » Mon Oct 01, 2018 4:59 pm

The forum (http://guitarra.artepulsado.com/foros/s ... a%F1ola%BB) has some interesting discussions concerning Manuela Vázquez-Barros and Pedro Aguilera. Also about the education of young women at this time. It is clear that the participants have training in scholarship and in evaluating historical evidence. This is good news and it is refreshing to read.

The first page of the music (reproduced on the website) shows that the Youtube video does not exactly follow the manuscript; there are editorial changes and the liberties with the rhythm. Not that one should object to this. Just that one should be cautious about judging the music through the performance of any individual artist rather than by investigating the score. Of course other interpretations are possible.

The ending clearly shows the signature of Manuela Vázquez-Barros and the date of March 1902. Since there are other manuscripts from her hand in this collection, we should consider it likely that this is her handwriting.

The structure of this "serenata" (=music directed to a beloved) follows that of the early romantic "ballade" (think Chopin), an almost novelistic narrative in music. The composer uses a number of recurring elements, subjecting them to different styles (e.g., barcarole, lullaby, waltz, a bit of counterpoint, fantasy, fanfare, etc.). This is typical of the ballade. Like Albeniz and Granados, the composer utilizes romantic form and styles alloyed with Spanish rhythms and "guitaristic" devices of the time (expressive slides, idiomatic arpeggios, tremolo, etc.).

There is much that can be said about this intriguing piece. Analysis (I have a "dirty" score to consult) reveals sophisticated features in a number of different dimensions. It is a significant work for the guitar from the period, no matter who composed it.

Chris Delisa
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Chris Delisa » Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:40 pm

Well, I got my copy of the score today. Sightreading it and man is it hard for the left hand! It's a hefty book and even has scans of every page of the manuscript.

amade
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by amade » Tue Oct 16, 2018 11:25 pm

IMG_2142.JPG
It is an impressive volume. Very good critical notes and commentary. Señor Huedo should be commended. If only we had this kind of critical apparatus for Tárrega's complete works. Someday it is bound to happen.
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Chris Delisa
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Re: Tárrega's newly-discovered 'Serenata Española'

Post by Chris Delisa » Wed Oct 17, 2018 3:32 pm

One of the most interesting things I found about the edition is that it shines a light on the significance of Arcas. Here we were just talking about the authorship of Gran Jota. It looks like among the manuscripts of Serenata Española, an alternative version of Jota by Arcas was found. Apparently Tárrega used perhaps up to 2/3 of Arcas' version in his Gran Jota. On top of that, Tárrega's "Tango" appears to actually be based on a piece by Arcas as well.

If both Tárrega and Garcia Tolsa were incorporating material by Arcas in their music, it just goes to show you how influential he was. The current edition makes it sound like this is only the beginning of the research project as future editions might be published including the non-Tárrega pieces discovered in the Vázquez-Barros collection.

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