Do you have your eyes on the left hand?

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CodyLam

Do you have your eyes on the left hand?

Post by CodyLam » Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:32 am

And is it a good thing?
I see some performers have eyes solid on the fingers and some opposite.

guitarstudent

Post by guitarstudent » Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:36 am

I think you should be able to play blindfolded, afterall, maybe you might loose your sight one day.
Plus, when reading a piece, its much better to let the fingers go straight to target by themselves so you can conetrate on reading the piece, in my lowly opinion.

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Michael
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Location: England

Post by Michael » Fri Oct 06, 2006 11:26 am

When I know pieces well, I always try to play without looking at my left hand.
Either at the music but more often, with my eyes closed to block what is around me out and to put more feeling into what I am playing.

Sure, I misfret etc. but I believe practice will make perfect eventually.
All the good music has already been written by people with wigs and stuff.
(Frank Zappa)

arons

Post by arons » Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:12 pm

Hmm...interesting...I have the opposite approach. When I'm learning a piece and sight-reading it, I'm obviously not looking at my left hand. But after I've learned a piece, my eyes are fixated on the fingerboard. It was taught to me that one of the most effective ways to make smooth, clean transitions and position changes is to divert the eye to the new position just a split second before the transition. This is a technique that has been tremendously helpful to me and I can't imagine not doing it at this point.

Anybody else share this practice?

Best,
Aron

Sasquatch51

Post by Sasquatch51 » Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:16 pm

arons wrote:Hmm...interesting...I have the opposite approach. When I'm learning a piece and sight-reading it, I'm obviously not looking at my left hand. But after I've learned a piece, my eyes are fixated on the fingerboard. It was taught to me that one of the most effective ways to make smooth, clean transitions and position changes is to divert the eye to the new position just a split second before the transition. This is a technique that has been tremendously helpful to me and I can't imagine not doing it at this point.

Anybody else share this practice?

Best,
Aron
Yep. I don't always look at the fretboard, but when I feel the need for additional "security" in tougher transitions I do and I use the "lookahead" technique.

Johnny

Post by Johnny » Fri Oct 06, 2006 10:57 pm

I only look at my left hand at the very begining and when I hear buzzing or other mistakes from poor fretting. Otherwise, I am looking at the music.

Derry

Post by Derry » Fri Oct 06, 2006 11:21 pm

once I learn a piece I seldom will look but when it is something new and difficult I will always look for accurate finger placement,,

when reading my mysic I always have the music placed in front of the neck so I (my body) is aimed at a 45 degree or greater angle from my music,, this way I can read the music as well as see the neck with very small eye changes,,

was watching a Pepe film the other day and he will look occasionally, have eyes closed and at times have his head forward of the upper bout,, doubt if he ever has to look though,,

I watch some of the guitarest on county music or some rock on tv and interesting how many of them have to watch for simple moves,,

guess it is what you get use to and will help you do your best,,

sV_cheats 1

Post by sV_cheats 1 » Sat Oct 07, 2006 3:05 am

When reading, I'm always looking at the music, because I've got no choice! :roll:
But if I've comfortably memorized a piece, I'm defintatly looking at the fretboard to anticipate shifts and whatnot. I NEVER look at where my fingers are currently placed, but where they are going. That seems to reduce the ammount of mistakes. Ocassionally I look at my right hand if something calls for it, but it's uncommon for me. I like to close my eyes every once in a while, I think it's quite fun! Plus, you concentrate on hearing the music rather than seeing it.

amateur

Post by amateur » Sat Oct 07, 2006 4:45 am

When a piece is memorized, I only look at the fingerboard when shifting, especially when it comes to the transitions of barre chords. I close my eyes the rest of the time.

anathem

Post by anathem » Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:30 am

amateur wrote:When a piece is memorized, I only look at the fingerboard when shifting, especially when it comes to the transitions of barre chords. I close my eyes the rest of the time.
same here.
i try to focus more on the musicality than in the way fingers move coz there's always the risk of losing focus on music for fear that you won't get something right in technique, which is inevitable as a developing guitarist

Hippydolphin

Post by Hippydolphin » Sat Oct 07, 2006 1:38 pm

I think it's important to get to the playing blindfolded stage - it's so useful in truly hearing what you are doing and addressing all the musical aspects of the piece. That said I also enjoy watching my left hand - purely because of the beauty of the movements. I find it really soothing and inspiring.

supermaqp

Post by supermaqp » Sat Oct 07, 2006 6:36 pm

When I study a piece I first read the must music never looking at the guitar, unless there is a difficult passage, once I learn the piece, I rehearse it by looking at the fret for perfecting details. Then I re-rehearse it by playing with out looking at piece, I'd say that the guitarrist should do what he wants, after all he's the one who takes command on stage.

The advantage of looking at the frets is that it build's confidence when playing, it gives you more chance for anticipating your nexts positions, of course this confidence can be a bit dangerous when you practice this way to much.

javier

Eyes on the guitar

Post by javier » Sun Oct 08, 2006 3:49 pm

I think it also depends on the piece you're playing. For example, when I'm playing, say, Villalobos's study#1, I have my eyes on my right hand since that study is heavy on arpeggio and esier on the left hand.

Javier

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Vesuvio
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Post by Vesuvio » Sun Oct 08, 2006 7:31 pm

I try not to look at either hand and focus mainly on the music in front of me. However, big jumps along the fretboard rarely work out for me unless I do look at my left hand. I went to a recital a few days ago and was sat just in front of the guitarist. That was an education as I watched him play extremely complex music faultlessly and without without looking at his left hand for minutes on end, regardless of position or the density of the chords. It can be done! Best wishes, V.

javier

Eyes on the guitar

Post by javier » Mon Oct 09, 2006 3:16 am

I attended a concert just like the one Vesuvio is refering to, and I was really impressed by the way the guitarrist played. It was Ricardo Gallen from Spain. He played incredibly complex music from all periods with amazing accuracy and mastery. He didn't even use a foot stand, he just sat with her leg crossed and played in that position for nearly two hours. It was awsome. Sometimes I wonder how he could possibly have played for such a long time without a single mistake!!! Whoa!

Javier

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