Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

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Jazz cancan
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 6:13 am

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Jazz cancan » Thu Nov 22, 2018 8:29 pm

:casque: :casque: :casque:

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:25 am

man-argentina wrote:
Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:28 am
Im not an expert but i really like it, really liked the piece, and the tone of the guitar, theres something about record with portable recorders or even cams that makes you feel the ambient of the room and the guitar really alive, not like in a studio that at least to make the sound a bit steryl and unreal.
Thank you so much man-argentina! :D

:merci:

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:26 am

Ozishko wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 12:53 pm
I like this. Thanks for sharing!
Ozishko thank you for the kind words and for listening and commenting! :D

:merci:

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:27 am

sxedio wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 9:43 am
Well played, and great music, Baden Powell really had a way with the guitar!
sxedio thanks so much! yes Baden was an incredible artist completely on fire! :D

:merci:

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:28 am

RobMacKillop wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 10:50 am
Beautiful playing, Ray, of a very nice piece of music. You've inspired me to have a look at it.
Thanks Rob for the kind words! - would love to hear you play this< I enjoy your playing a lot, please record it for us! :D

Best, Ray :merci:

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:30 am

Rognvald wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:31 pm
Hi, Ray,
A technical question: why the reverb? Thanks, Rognvald
Hi Rognvald I'll answer your question if you tell me what you though of my performance, deal? :wink:

Thanks, Ray

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:31 am

a guitar player wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:27 pm
That's some very nice playing!

I recently found this piece in the collection "Saitenwege nach Südamerika 1" which contains some nice easy-intermediate South American music. It became stuck in my head immediately. It's playable (with some stuttering...) even for a relative beginner like me and you can play it very expressively. I think those jazzy conclusion chords which are at around 2:21 in your recording are great and I usually emphasize those when playing myself.
Thanks for the kind words and for pointing out those chords that I emphasize - I do veer from the score a bit a bit of poetic license as it were.

Thanks again! :merci:

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:32 am

EdmondC wrote:
Fri Nov 16, 2018 10:22 pm
A superb interpretation !
:bravo: :casque: :casque:
Edmond
Thank you EdmondC - much appreciated!!! Glad you enjoyed! :D

Best, Ray

:merci:

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:33 am

Jazz cancan wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 8:29 pm
:casque: :casque: :casque:
Jazz cancan - thank you so much!

:chitarrista: :chitarrista: :chitarrista: :merci:

Rognvald
Posts: 1131
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2017 1:21 am

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Rognvald » Thu Nov 29, 2018 4:38 pm

Ray wrote:
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:30 am
Rognvald wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:31 pm
Hi, Ray,
A technical question: why the reverb? Thanks, Rognvald
Hi Rognvald I'll answer your question if you tell me what you though of my performance, deal? :wink:

Thanks, Ray
Hi, Ray,
Back in the early 90's when I transitioned from Saxophone/flute to CG, I attempted to listen to as many CG's as possible(via recordings) to get a sense of the idiom and develop my own style/sound. I found after a very short period of time that similar to Jazz Music, the best way to judge a performer is to listen to them playing live. However, this was not easy since CG was not as popular as Jazz in Chicago and live concerts were few and far between. One of my favorite players in those early years was Liona Boyd who I felt had a very lyrical style and full, lush sound. And being a typical pre-politically correct enlightened male(read: primal), I found her attractive. So, when the opportunity existed to hear her play live in the Chicago suburbs, I bought a couple tickets and we went to the concert. The concert hall held about 500 people and had good acoustics. The sound system(she played into a mic) was very neutral and she sat close to the audience. She played many of her favorites(Spanish Romance, etc) that were technically simple pieces that allowed for personal interpretation, dynamics and tone colors. And, from the beginning, the aural memory of the lush sound I listened to in the recordings was transformed into a thin, weak sound that lacked warmth and personality. What happened? Basically, the sound I enjoyed so much in her recordings was a manufactured sound that was enhanced/mixed, transformed into something other than the live performance. I left disappointed but, however, enlightened. So, in a long-winded answer, I asked why you used the reverb since it does alter one's true sound into something quite different and because it has this tendency, it gives one an untrue sense of the player's ability. So, for me, I cannot possibly judge your above recording with any honesty or accuracy. I hope this is clear. Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

joejitsumd
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2018 2:38 am

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by joejitsumd » Fri Dec 14, 2018 1:15 am

sounds fantastic

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Dec 16, 2018 8:40 pm

Rognvald wrote:
Thu Nov 29, 2018 4:38 pm
Ray wrote:
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:30 am
Rognvald wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 4:31 pm
Hi, Ray,
A technical question: why the reverb? Thanks, Rognvald
Hi Rognvald I'll answer your question if you tell me what you though of my performance, deal? :wink:

Thanks, Ray
Hi, Ray,
Back in the early 90's when I transitioned from Saxophone/flute to CG, I attempted to listen to as many CG's as possible(via recordings) to get a sense of the idiom and develop my own style/sound. I found after a very short period of time that similar to Jazz Music, the best way to judge a performer is to listen to them playing live. However, this was not easy since CG was not as popular as Jazz in Chicago and live concerts were few and far between. One of my favorite players in those early years was Liona Boyd who I felt had a very lyrical style and full, lush sound. And being a typical pre-politically correct enlightened male(read: primal), I found her attractive. So, when the opportunity existed to hear her play live in the Chicago suburbs, I bought a couple tickets and we went to the concert. The concert hall held about 500 people and had good acoustics. The sound system(she played into a mic) was very neutral and she sat close to the audience. She played many of her favorites(Spanish Romance, etc) that were technically simple pieces that allowed for personal interpretation, dynamics and tone colors. And, from the beginning, the aural memory of the lush sound I listened to in the recordings was transformed into a thin, weak sound that lacked warmth and personality. What happened? Basically, the sound I enjoyed so much in her recordings was a manufactured sound that was enhanced/mixed, transformed into something other than the live performance. I left disappointed but, however, enlightened. So, in a long-winded answer, I asked why you used the reverb since it does alter one's true sound into something quite different and because it has this tendency, it gives one an untrue sense of the player's ability. So, for me, I cannot possibly judge your above recording with any honesty or accuracy. I hope this is clear. Playing again . . . Rognvald
Hi Rognvald,

Thanks very much for your informative post! I hear you regarding the reverb so I recorded it again for you on my phone real simple using the built in voice memo app. So here it is again in a new performance SANS REVERB! Please let me know what you think now, thanks! :D

Best, Ray
Ray_Valsa Sem Nome_NEW NO REVERB.mp3
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Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Sun Dec 16, 2018 8:57 pm

joejitsumd wrote:
Fri Dec 14, 2018 1:15 am
sounds fantastic
Thank you so much - much appreciated! :D

Best, Ray

Rognvald
Posts: 1131
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2017 1:21 am

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Rognvald » Mon Dec 17, 2018 9:08 pm

Ray wrote:
Sun Dec 16, 2018 8:40 pm
Rognvald wrote:
Thu Nov 29, 2018 4:38 pm
Ray wrote:
Sun Nov 25, 2018 6:30 am


Hi Rognvald I'll answer your question if you tell me what you though of my performance, deal? :wink:

Thanks, Ray
Hi, Ray,
Back in the early 90's when I transitioned from Saxophone/flute to CG, I attempted to listen to as many CG's as possible(via recordings) to get a sense of the idiom and develop my own style/sound. I found after a very short period of time that similar to Jazz Music, the best way to judge a performer is to listen to them playing live. However, this was not easy since CG was not as popular as Jazz in Chicago and live concerts were few and far between. One of my favorite players in those early years was Liona Boyd who I felt had a very lyrical style and full, lush sound. And being a typical pre-politically correct enlightened male(read: primal), I found her attractive. So, when the opportunity existed to hear her play live in the Chicago suburbs, I bought a couple tickets and we went to the concert. The concert hall held about 500 people and had good acoustics. The sound system(she played into a mic) was very neutral and she sat close to the audience. She played many of her favorites(Spanish Romance, etc) that were technically simple pieces that allowed for personal interpretation, dynamics and tone colors. And, from the beginning, the aural memory of the lush sound I listened to in the recordings was transformed into a thin, weak sound that lacked warmth and personality. What happened? Basically, the sound I enjoyed so much in her recordings was a manufactured sound that was enhanced/mixed, transformed into something other than the live performance. I left disappointed but, however, enlightened. So, in a long-winded answer, I asked why you used the reverb since it does alter one's true sound into something quite different and because it has this tendency, it gives one an untrue sense of the player's ability. So, for me, I cannot possibly judge your above recording with any honesty or accuracy. I hope this is clear. Playing again . . . Rognvald
Hi Rognvald,

Thanks very much for your informative post! I hear you regarding the reverb so I recorded it again for you on my phone real simple using the built in voice memo app. So here it is again in a new performance SANS REVERB! Please let me know what you think now, thanks! :D

Best, Ray

Ray_Valsa Sem Nome_NEW NO REVERB.mp3

Thanks, again, Ray for the second performance sans reverb. When I listen to a musician perform, I am not overly concerned about technical glitches(you have none), as some are, but focus on what the musician is saying. We musicians are communicators and when we communicate we tell the audience about ourselves since we all have a special, unique voice . . . for better or worse. And, our voice is a combination of our unique sound coupled with the interpretative nuances of the music we choose to play. So, even the music we choose to perform is an indicator of who we are as human beings and where we have been intellectually, emotionally and experientially in life. Valsa Sem Nome literally means "waltz without a name" in Portuguese which implies, to me, a dance with a sense of mystery that is private, personal and from the heart. In order to communicate this to your audience, you must be able to grasp this feeling from the colors of the music and translate it for others through your guitar much as a poet does when he reads his poems to others. I think you have done this very well. Congratulations. Playing again . . . Rognvald P.S. For me, music is purity and it is the primal, unadulterated sound of the musician sans "effects" that we must strive to maintain to preserve our precious Art.
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

Ray
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:41 pm

Re: Powell, Baden - Valsa Sem Nome

Post by Ray » Tue Dec 18, 2018 4:06 am

Rognvald wrote:
Mon Dec 17, 2018 9:08 pm
Ray wrote:
Sun Dec 16, 2018 8:40 pm
Rognvald wrote:
Thu Nov 29, 2018 4:38 pm


Hi, Ray,
Back in the early 90's when I transitioned from Saxophone/flute to CG, I attempted to listen to as many CG's as possible(via recordings) to get a sense of the idiom and develop my own style/sound. I found after a very short period of time that similar to Jazz Music, the best way to judge a performer is to listen to them playing live. However, this was not easy since CG was not as popular as Jazz in Chicago and live concerts were few and far between. One of my favorite players in those early years was Liona Boyd who I felt had a very lyrical style and full, lush sound. And being a typical pre-politically correct enlightened male(read: primal), I found her attractive. So, when the opportunity existed to hear her play live in the Chicago suburbs, I bought a couple tickets and we went to the concert. The concert hall held about 500 people and had good acoustics. The sound system(she played into a mic) was very neutral and she sat close to the audience. She played many of her favorites(Spanish Romance, etc) that were technically simple pieces that allowed for personal interpretation, dynamics and tone colors. And, from the beginning, the aural memory of the lush sound I listened to in the recordings was transformed into a thin, weak sound that lacked warmth and personality. What happened? Basically, the sound I enjoyed so much in her recordings was a manufactured sound that was enhanced/mixed, transformed into something other than the live performance. I left disappointed but, however, enlightened. So, in a long-winded answer, I asked why you used the reverb since it does alter one's true sound into something quite different and because it has this tendency, it gives one an untrue sense of the player's ability. So, for me, I cannot possibly judge your above recording with any honesty or accuracy. I hope this is clear. Playing again . . . Rognvald
Hi Rognvald,

Thanks very much for your informative post! I hear you regarding the reverb so I recorded it again for you on my phone real simple using the built in voice memo app. So here it is again in a new performance SANS REVERB! Please let me know what you think now, thanks! :D

Best, Ray

Ray_Valsa Sem Nome_NEW NO REVERB.mp3

Thanks, again, Ray for the second performance sans reverb. When I listen to a musician perform, I am not overly concerned about technical glitches(you have none), as some are, but focus on what the musician is saying. We musicians are communicators and when we communicate we tell the audience about ourselves since we all have a special, unique voice . . . for better or worse. And, our voice is a combination of our unique sound coupled with the interpretative nuances of the music we choose to play. So, even the music we choose to perform is an indicator of who we are as human beings and where we have been intellectually, emotionally and experientially in life. Valsa Sem Nome literally means "waltz without a name" in Portuguese which implies, to me, a dance with a sense of mystery that is private, personal and from the heart. In order to communicate this to your audience, you must be able to grasp this feeling from the colors of the music and translate it for others through your guitar much as a poet does when he reads his poems to others. I think you have done this very well. Congratulations. Playing again . . . Rognvald P.S. For me, music is purity and it is the primal, unadulterated sound of the musician sans "effects" that we must strive to maintain to preserve our precious Art.
Hi Rognvald,

Thanks again for even more musically insightful words and for taking the time out to listen to my updated no-reverb recording. And thank you for the kind words about my performance as well, much appreciated!

I'll be sure to upload a non-reverb version for you in my future recordings here on Delcamp. :D

Thanks again and best wishes, Ray

:merci:

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