Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Machete
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Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:36 pm

Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Machete » Sat Nov 10, 2018 2:44 pm

This is my biggest problem. I’m not a noob or anything. I can play some pieces here and there. I can play romance by anonymous lol and some other pieces like lagrima, etc.

I dont have a practice routine and Ive been looking for one and cant find one. Surely, they would tell you that you have to come up with one based on your needs, but there are so many exercises and I dont know what to practice. What Im doing right now is practicing giulianis right hand exercises but How is it possible that nobody wants to share their pracrice routine in detail?

I have yet to find a proper practice routine that I can copy or use as guidance and add my own exercises, etc

Nick Trapani
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Nick Trapani » Sat Nov 10, 2018 5:05 pm

You may want to look at a new book by Simon Powis of Classical Guitar Corner, it has 20 progressive Practice Routines. If you go to his site he has a new podcast about the routines which is quite interesting.

Machete
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Machete » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:02 pm

I'll check it out. What a looking for is a WORKOUT routine just like lifting weights. This doesn't exist for guitar. I've yet to find other people sharing their practice routines in detail or offering detailed samples. This is why many guitar players are terrible at practicing. If I could only have a detailed practice routine of 1 hour, 2 hours or more hours, that I can just follow and stick to, I would see results in my playing. Everything would be straight forward, cause all I would be following a proper practice routine that has already worked for someone else and then I would just add or extract exercises based on my needs as I progress.

Instead, many of us in the beginner to intermediate stages, are stuck in blindfold mode and don't know what to practice, what exercises to do. People love to tell you how much you suck or you can suck due to improper practice, but nobody every offers that practice for one to copy or at least, use it as guidance.

Machete
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Machete » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:09 pm

I just checked out this classicalguitarcorner, I think this routines are only on sheet music, not tablature which sucks for people like me who dont want to read music

Machete
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Machete » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:22 pm

I've spent the whole day looking on the internet for a detailed classical guitar routine I can copy, use as guidance and I can't find anything. How is one supposed to progress if there is nothing out there. No wonder so many guitar players are stuck, especially for the classical guitar, which is more complex than other type of guitar styles. If you can't read music or afford a classical guitar teacher, you will simply not progress, or at the very best, you will train incorrectly and it will take you forever to see any results

Jason
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Jason » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:48 pm

Just a suggestion, you may progress faster if you learn to read music, even if you don't really want to. Doors will open if you do. :)
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Machete
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Machete » Sat Nov 10, 2018 11:23 pm

Jason wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:48 pm
Just a suggestion, you may progress faster if you learn to read music, even if you don't really want to. Doors will open if you do. :)
it would take many years for me to be able to read the pieces I want to play lol

I dont even know where to start. I have yet to find a classical guitar teacher in my area.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sat Nov 10, 2018 11:46 pm

Scott Tennants book Pumping Nylon. Search amzn in tab. But learn to read notation if you are serious about classical music on guitar.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
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Jason
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Jason » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:07 am

Machete wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 11:23 pm
Jason wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:48 pm
Just a suggestion, you may progress faster if you learn to read music, even if you don't really want to. Doors will open if you do. :)
it would take many years for me to be able to read the pieces I want to play lol

I dont even know where to start. I have yet to find a classical guitar teacher in my area.
Learning to read music is not as daunting as it may seem, and doing so, will make everything easier. There are lots of good method books available.
2018 Yamaha gc42s
72 Yamaha gc6d
76 Yamaha g220
71 Yamaha g100a
(At the moment)

2lost2find
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by 2lost2find » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:18 am

Machete wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 11:23 pm


it would take many years for me to be able to read the pieces I want to play lol
When I bought Solo Guitar Playing in the late 90s I had no idea how to read music. It did not take me years to get it figured out.

Machete
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Machete » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:29 am

The thing is, I only see the guitar as a hobby. I have played for more than 10 years, mostly electric guitar, but never really practiced much due to my lack of knowledge and sheer laziness. In other words, I didn't have the motivation and dedication. All that I can play now, which is nothing great, but not bad either, is due to whatever I managed to practiced or play over these years, I supposed it added up, but if I had practiced correctly for a few hours every single one of those day, I would be ten times better now. I always end up losing interest in the guitar, then going back to it again. Probably because is hard to be interested and have motivation for something that you barely see any results or see results slowly.

Only recently I got interested in classical guitar and I didn't have a problem with arpeggios and finger picking, obviously, I'm not fast like a virtuoso, but I'm not slow either. Since I consider this a hobby, I don't know if I'm willing to spend hundreds of dollars on a teacher. I'm not looking to be a virtuoso, but I want to play better. I want to be able to play some of the classical pieces I like.

For example, this is a piece that I managed to learn and play, obviously my execution of this piece isn't as clean and flawless as this person who has decades of proper practice under his belt lol but I can play it, so I'm not really a noob, I just feel stuck because I don't have a practice routine that I know WILL produce results. I can't read music and I already feel discouraged of even trying because I know it will take a long time for the guitar. I read plenty of bad stories of people getting frustrated with reading notation on guitar.

So far I managed to find tabs for most classical pieces. Many people out there who make business out of providing transcriptions in tab version.


DCGillrich
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by DCGillrich » Sun Nov 11, 2018 3:22 am

Hi @Machete

If you are looking for actual routines, I think you will struggle to find any authoritative guide on practice routines that does not use music notation. By authoritative, I mean routines that are well structured, with a pedagogical focus suited to different levels of ability. Music notation is essential to convey elements of playing that tab cannot (e.g. harmonic relationships, intervals, rhythmic structures, dynamics, note duration, finger patterns, etc.).

Good examples of resources already mentioned include the "20 progressive Practice Routines" by Simon Powis (suggested by Nick Trapani above) and Pumping Nylon. There are also books such as "The Art of Practicing" by Alice Arztz, "The Path to Virtuosity" by Ricardo Iznaola, and many other good resources, I am sure (including the classics by Carcassi, Carulli, and Aguado). In my opinion, the book by Simon Powis is especially useful because it is presented in modules (20 No.), each of which is linked to the Trinity College, AMEB, etc., grade system (more or less). So the routines are progressive, and competency in each gives a good guide to playing ability, or a level to which you are striving. Note, I am a member of the Classical Guitar Corner Academy, and use these routines every day.

Alternatively, if you are looking for guidance on how to structure practice, then consider looking at the following CGC public blog: https://www.classicalguitarcorner.com/6 ... -progress/. This gives you some strategies on what elements or ingredients to include in your practice depending on how much time you want to spend each day. The book by Richard Provost on "The Art and Technique of Practice" also gives great guidance on practice, and how to structure your daily practice routine, in more detail.

Cheers... Richard

PS--I also play guitar as an amateur, but still require a structured approach to learning and practicing to make progress and achieve personal satisfaction in being able to play more musically, expressively, and with ease.

2lost2find
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by 2lost2find » Sun Nov 11, 2018 1:25 pm

Machete wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:29 am


So far I managed to find tabs for most classical pieces. Many people out there who make business out of providing transcriptions in tab version.
It isn't most, man. There is an ocean of great classical guitar music out there that will probably never be available in a tab edition. Look, standard notation is an unintuitive, clunky system that really makes no sense at all, but it's so firmly entrenched that I see no chance of it being replaced anytime soon. Get a book like Solo Guitar Playing that teaches it from the ground up and it won't really take you that long. Once you've done it, all of this material will be at your fingertips.

Todd Tipton
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by Todd Tipton » Mon Nov 12, 2018 6:03 pm

I'll share how I organize my practice and how I encourage all of my students to do the same. First off, I start with the premise that we can't (or shouldn't) do everything everyday. Without organized practice; some things get too much attention, other things get neglected, we never feel like we reach our goals, and lots of time is wasted. To remedy this, I use a practice log. The practice log is very straightforward. There is space for the following categories:

New Repertoire
Old Repertoire
Scales
Right Hand Exercises
Left Hand Exercises

With the new rep, I have no more than 2 pieces in that category at any given time. If there is more, it usually has to "get in line" and wait its turn. With old repertoire as soon as a piece hits that category, it is by default to be "practice performed" no less than 4 times per week. Once a week, a make a super fast decision to either maintain the 4 times a week, or bump it down to 3 times per week. The ultimate goal is to get everything down to 1 time per week. In reality, pieces often bump down, bump up, or maintain their number. Further, I am often spending far more time with them. However, it is a great way to make sure the practice is well rounded, the pieces are well maintained, and that I am making weekly goals with the least amount of time needed. To explicitly state the goal here: to be able to always perform the music I have worked so hard on for others.

Concerning scales, I leave a little more space for details. Perhaps I'm doing free or rest stroke; im or ma, or pi, etc. There are also different reasons or ways I practice the scales. Maybe I'm working on speed and various exercises that help with that. I leave plenty of room to abbreviate what I'm doing, metronome markings, etc. Ultimately, this guides my scale work so that I am not doing the same things every day and that no particular types of practice is getting neglected. The variation on scale practice comes mostly from the ideas of Berg, Iznaola, or various flamenco players.

With right hand exercises, I primarily work out of Christopher Berg's Giuliani Revisited. I've worked out many different routines for these right hand arpeggio studies. All of the routines have two things in common: they are primarily the more common right hand patterns we see in the repertoire. They incorporate a pattern or two that utilized m and a a lot more. Further, the routines may only have a few patterns, or they may have many. More time is to be spend with each pattern in the "smaller" routines. Taking it further, I may do speed bursts, or rhythmic variations. This allows me to get a well rounded workout, not neglect anything, and not waste time doing the same things over and over. The variations of these exercises come mostly from the ideas of Berg or Stanley Yates.

With the left hand, it is the same idea. There are many exercises that have made it into my regimen. Through experience, and trial and error, I've chosen the ones that are most useful and beneficial for me. And it is good to shake things up a bit no merely relying on the same few exercises. Further, I occasionally experiment with new ones, or ones that I may have falsely assumed aren't so useful. Keeping a record of everything saves me time and makes sure that my practice is well balanced. Most of my left hand work comes almost directly from either Shearer or Carlevaro.

There are a few personal categories in my practice log, but I won't mention them.

In closing, I'll explicitly state the theme of all of this. As we gradually learn exercises, some are more or less useful. Further, there are many ways the exercises can be approached. There are particular benefits to doing exercises in particular ways. It is all too much to do, yet none of it should be neglected. Without a practice log, I am simply wasting lots of time. Concerning repertoire, it is the same attitude. If I'm going to take the trouble to learn a piece, it is because I want to be able to perform it well. Going to all of that effort is detrimental and for nothing if it isn't maintained. Again, it is simply too much to do. The practice log helps to spend the least amount of time and effort to maintain a piece.

Happy practicing.
Dr. Todd Tipton, Noda Guitar Studio
Charlotte, NC, USA (available via Skype)

a human
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Re: Does anyone have a sample practice routine?

Post by a human » Mon Nov 12, 2018 8:59 pm

A lot depends on your goals, where you are and where you want to be.

A mechanical approach to practicing would not appeal to me, even as an engineer. I am looking for escape to another place through the music (also true with my horseback riding). The zen moments.

I want to enjoy playing my guitar and exercise my mind by learning new music that might challenge me a little and teach me something. I have to really like the piece, for motivation. I am not motivated by scales or lifting weights, but accept the fact a little bit of medicine is a good thing. I want to look forward to my playing, and stop before I ache or get frustrated. I can read music and slowly work my way through a fairly difficult piece in time. That doesn't bother me.

Of course, I am old and going no where fast, but the playing brings me joy and satisfaction. When I practice, I loosen up with a few scales and work through 5 works in progress, concentrating on difficult areas, fingerings, speed adjustment, technique, memorization, etc. That usually consumes my time, since my plan is to stop before the mind flakes out or body aches.

Some days I indulge myself with playing old friends.

At the moment, I don't play in church, so when a piece seems done, it moves to the old friends pile for later amusement.
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