Practicing Tremolo

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Argent
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Argent » Mon Jan 28, 2019 5:02 pm

The tremolo sections in Regondi’s Reverie Nocturne are my favourite to play. It is more difficult than Recuerdos & Limonsna though. Some say it’s the first fully fledged tremolo to be written ..?
David Argent Cedar 2005

Todd Tipton
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Todd Tipton » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:08 pm

A great little piece with a relatively easier tremolo section might be Yuquijiro Yocoh's Sakura, Theme and Variations. Sure, it is a very well-known piece. However, I think the audience always needs a little of that. The piece is overall very playable and the guitar really shines.
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Frank Nordberg
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Frank Nordberg » Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:18 pm

Todd Tipton wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 6:08 pm
A great little piece with a relatively easier tremolo section might be Yuquijiro Yocoh's Sakura, Theme and Variations.
One tip: there play the tremolo variation twice as fast as notated. It's actually notated at half speed compared to the other variations and I don't believe that's what Yocoh intended.

If you want to drill the basic tremolo pattern with hardly any technical challenges at all, there a piece specially made for that in the score collection here: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=74629
I'm too modest to mention who wrote and posted it. :P

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guitarist_le
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by guitarist_le » Tue Jan 29, 2019 5:07 am

Argent wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 5:02 pm
The tremolo sections in Regondi’s Reverie Nocturne are my favourite to play. It is more difficult than Recuerdos & Limonsna though. Some say it’s the first fully fledged tremolo to be written ..?
Haven't heard that piece in forever! love that tremolo part. Might get on it pretty soon.

Guitar Maniac
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Guitar Maniac » Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:15 am

[Content deleted due to duplicate]
Last edited by Guitar Maniac on Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

Guitar Maniac
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Guitar Maniac » Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:15 am

Argent wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 5:02 pm
The tremolo sections in Regondi’s Reverie Nocturne are my favourite to play. It is more difficult than Recuerdos & Limonsna though. Some say it’s the first fully fledged tremolo to be written ..?
Nah I'd rather mention about "Sueno en la floresta" , which imo the most beautiful tremolo piece ever composed for classical guitar :casque:

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Julian Ward
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Julian Ward » Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:43 am

Argent wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 5:02 pm
The tremolo sections in Regondi’s Reverie Nocturne are my favourite to play. It is more difficult than Recuerdos & Limonsna though. Some say it’s the first fully fledged tremolo to be written ..?
I wasn't familiar with this piece, so I just had a couple of listens and watch throughs... The tremolo section itself is with certainty easier than Limonsa, very few barres and stretches and although the melody has more movement, it is relatively simple. Of course this Reverie is overall more difficult than Recuerdos (which is quite straightforward) but there are two things that make Recuerdos difficult for many - one is that dreaded second string and the other are the slurs - they are extremely tricky to get right.

As a composition this 'Reverie' seems quite pretty - although it is very long with a very long opening that doesn't particularly go anywhere, it kind of sounds like a great big introduction. The tremolo section is pretty, but overall I can see why the piece did not gain popularity with players..

Compositionally I think Barrios wins hands down, Limonsa is quite superb and although difficult it is not too long which makes it just perfect not only as a concert piece but also for the listener - Just the right level of complexity and harmonic progression and overal 'shape'.

Now as mentined above 'Un Sueño en la Floresta' (Barrios) is on another level again. It is beyond the capabilities of many players but as a tremolo composition it is absolutely untouchable! If you really listen to it, it is just so beautiful and clever. The non tremolo sections are short - but interesting! It certainly is the greatest of them all and one which I will get around to learning one day, but it is on the long side and I know will take a lot of my time up. For those that are not that familiar with it, below is in my opinion the greatest ever performance of it, a truly outstanding rendition from the tiny Kyuhee Park.

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Argent
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Argent » Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:12 pm

Julian Ward wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:43 am
Argent wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 5:02 pm
The tremolo sections in Regondi’s Reverie Nocturne are my favourite to play. It is more difficult than Recuerdos & Limonsna though. Some say it’s the first fully fledged tremolo to be written ..?
I wasn't familiar with this piece, so I just had a couple of listens and watch throughs... The tremolo section itself is with certainty easier than Limonsa, very few barres and stretches and although the melody has more movement, it is relatively simple. Of course this Reverie is overall more difficult than Recuerdos (which is quite straightforward) but there are two things that make Recuerdos difficult for many - one is that dreaded second string and the other are the slurs - they are extremely tricky to get right.

As a composition this 'Reverie' seems quite pretty - although it is very long with a very long opening that doesn't particularly go anywhere, it kind of sounds like a great big introduction. The tremolo section is pretty, but overall I can see why the piece did not gain popularity with players..

Compositionally I think Barrios wins hands down, Limonsa is quite superb and although difficult it is not too long which makes it just perfect not only as a concert piece but also for the listener - Just the right level of complexity and harmonic progression and overal 'shape'.

Now as mentined above 'Un Sueño en la Floresta' (Barrios) is on another level again. It is beyond the capabilities of many players but as a tremolo composition it is absolutely untouchable! If you really listen to it, it is just so beautiful and clever. The non tremolo sections are short - but interesting! It certainly is the greatest of them all and one which I will get around to learning one day, but it is on the long side and I know will take a lot of my time up. For those that are not that familiar with it, below is in my opinion the greatest ever performance of it, a truly outstanding rendition from the tiny Kyuhee Park.


I have to disagree with your statement about Limonsna and Recuerdos being more difficult as I can play all three and the Reverie tremolo is certainly the most challenging. Yes there are few barre chords but the tremolo melody moving around a lot more , the phrasing and keeping the accompaniment balanced and bass note lengths in check etc takes a lot of work.

This is only my opinion though.

Which recording of the Reverie did you listen to ?

There are a few that do not do it justice. Johannes Moller plays it very well.



I do agree that Sueno is very beautiful and I very much enjoyed playing it when I was a student. The minor section of tremolo is very haunting.
David Argent Cedar 2005

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Julian Ward
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Julian Ward » Sat Feb 02, 2019 6:48 pm

Not Recuerdos - as that is relatively easy apart from the difficulties of the second string and the slurs. I listened to a video recording by Drew Henderson, as his was the the first to appear on Youtube. He seems to play it very well. I just watched it again and the tremolo section is very charming, but it doesn't look difficult. But I can't really try it out as the piece as a whole just isn't grabbing my attention enough! I wish I had learned Sueno as a student, as that is when you have so much time available!
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Argent
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Argent » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:17 pm

Haha tell me about it. We all took time for granted as students! Yes he does play it well technically. Not expressive enough for my taste though.

I guess gauging difficulty of any piece is subjective as some people find certain pieces easier than others and vice versa.
David Argent Cedar 2005

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Julian Ward
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Julian Ward » Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:26 pm

Didn't we just! And yes, I will go along with that.
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SteveL123
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by SteveL123 » Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:41 am

Julian Ward wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:43 am
(......................)

Compositionally I think Barrios wins hands down, Limonsa is quite superb and although difficult it is not too long which makes it just perfect not only as a concert piece but also for the listener - Just the right level of complexity and harmonic progression and overal 'shape'.
(..................)
Limosna?

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Julian Ward
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Julian Ward » Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:07 am

SteveL123 wrote:
Sun Feb 03, 2019 2:41 am
Julian Ward wrote:
Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:43 am
(......................)

Compositionally I think Barrios wins hands down, Limonsa is quite superb and although difficult it is not too long which makes it just perfect not only as a concert piece but also for the listener - Just the right level of complexity and harmonic progression and overal 'shape'.
(..................)
Limosna?
It is Mr Argents fault...he spelt it wrongly first!
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vesa
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by vesa » Sun Mar 17, 2019 6:32 am

Parkening tip:
1. When p strikes, plant a and take care of that m and i are
on the right side of the strings.
2. Keep the knuckles in about 90° angle towards the strings.
Tennant tip:
1. Plant, plant, plant and plant.
Vesa Kuokkanen

Antonio Marin nr. 813 1995 (Bouchet)
Vesa Kuokkanen 2016

Edgar
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Re: Practicing Tremolo

Post by Edgar » Sun Mar 17, 2019 7:00 am

My teacher has an exercise whereby I play the tremolo with forte and staccato, alternating to a comfortable, even speed - then back to staccato. I hope this helps.

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