Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

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lucy
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Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

Post by lucy » Mon Jul 22, 2019 3:44 pm

Hi All

A less "romantic" performance of this piece. In the past, a few members politely criticised the amount of rubato I used. Just wondered what people think of it now. All comments welcome. Thanks. :)

"There is no duty we so much underrate as the duty of being happy.
By being happy we sow anonymous benefits upon the world."
Robert Louis Stevenson

RobMacKillop
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Re: Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

Post by RobMacKillop » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:34 pm

Dear Lucy, don't try to please people, especially folk on guitar fora. There are two people whose thoughts are worth considering: the composer and yourself. What did Sor want, and what do you want? Are they the same thing, or radically different? It's okay to be sort of the same, and it's equally okay to be radically different, just don't pretend (not that I'm accusing you of doing so!) that the composer wants the radically-different interpretation that you might prefer.

For my part (and feel free to ignore me) I'd like to hear you do a few things:

1. Count the beats in the bars at the end of sections. You have a habit of jumping into the new section too soon.

2. Try to separate the melody more from the accompaniment. Sometimes the accompaniment notes were too loud, leading me to wonder if you regarded them as melody notes. With the limited dynamic range of the guitar, this means making the accompaniment notes quieter, rather than hitting the melody notes louder. Play the melody on its own - sing along with it - and when you add back in the accompaniment, lock on to the melody, don't lose it or confuse it!

3. Check out the E# bits on the first string - you are not wholly on top of the technical demands thereabouts.

4.There is a terrible and depressing Rule or Law that I've seen people on this forum and elsewhere espouse that Classical-period music should not have rubato, and that rubato only belongs to the Romantic period. Utter tosh! This piece is clearly a song-like melody with accompaniment, so learn to sing it, and note where you require breaths. You can ease in and out of these breaths, and, yes, that might sound a but rubato-ish, but don't worry about it. The greatest complement anyone can give you is that you make the instrument sing.


There's a lot of talk about authenticity in musical performance, but for me the most authentic thing you can be is to be yourself. So, listen to what others have to say, maybe even try out their suggestions, but never forget that it is your performance, your interpretation, your guitar. Once you start trusting yourself, your own voice will emerge, and that is more important than anything.

soltirefa
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Re: Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

Post by soltirefa » Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:03 pm

I liked it.

Is that amp you're using a Roland AC33? I saw a review on Bradford Werner's site and it looks like a nice little amp. The one he reviewed can be used with batteries, making it great for venues with nowhere to plug in.

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lucy
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Re: Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

Post by lucy » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:40 am

Thanks very much for taking the time to give such detailed feedback Rob. :)
RobMacKillop wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:34 pm
1. Count the beats in the bars at the end of sections. You have a habit of jumping into the new section too soon.

2. Try to separate the melody more from the accompaniment. Sometimes the accompaniment notes were too loud, leading me to wonder if you regarded them as melody notes. With the limited dynamic range of the guitar, this means making the accompaniment notes quieter, rather than hitting the melody notes louder. Play the melody on its own - sing along with it - and when you add back in the accompaniment, lock on to the melody, don't lose it or confuse it!

3. Check out the E# bits on the first string - you are not wholly on top of the technical demands thereabouts.

4.There is a terrible and depressing Rule or Law that I've seen people on this forum and elsewhere espouse that Classical-period music should not have rubato, and that rubato only belongs to the Romantic period. Utter tosh! This piece is clearly a song-like melody with accompaniment, so learn to sing it, and note where you require breaths. You can ease in and out of these breaths, and, yes, that might sound a but rubato-ish, but don't worry about it. The greatest complement anyone can give you is that you make the instrument sing.
I agree with all points 1 - 4. :casque:
RobMacKillop wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:34 pm
There's a lot of talk about authenticity in musical performance, but for me the most authentic thing you can be is to be yourself. So, listen to what others have to say, maybe even try out their suggestions, but never forget that it is your performance, your interpretation, your guitar. Once you start trusting yourself, your own voice will emerge, and that is more important than anything.
This too. It's SO important to follow your own vision.

And in keeping with that, I'd like to share something:

“The player of the inner game comes to value the art of relaxed concentration above all other skills; he discovers a true basis for self-confidence; and he learns that the secret to winning any game lies in not trying too hard.”

“Letting it happen is not making it happen. It is not trying hard.”

W. Timothy Gallwey, The Inner Game of Tennis

I looked at this book, very briefly, a few years ago, but didn't really take it in. However, when I started performing in public, regularly, two years ago, I ended up following its principles. Someone told me the other day, what you're doing is all in that book!! So, I looked it up online. (There are loads of companion books too, on different subjects.)

The good news is I'm now developing a "relaxed concentration" - the key was not trying to "hit the right shots"!!

Hope that makes sense. I think I'm moving onto another stage: I'm going to start work on playing the right notes - in the right order. :wink:
"There is no duty we so much underrate as the duty of being happy.
By being happy we sow anonymous benefits upon the world."
Robert Louis Stevenson

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lucy
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Re: Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

Post by lucy » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:43 am

soltirefa wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:03 pm
I liked it.

Is that amp you're using a Roland AC33? I saw a review on Bradford Werner's site and it looks like a nice little amp. The one he reviewed can be used with batteries, making it great for venues with nowhere to plug in.
Thank you Soltirefa. :)

Yes, it's a Roland AC33. It's extremely light too. A great purchase!! :D
"There is no duty we so much underrate as the duty of being happy.
By being happy we sow anonymous benefits upon the world."
Robert Louis Stevenson

RobMacKillop
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Location: Edinburgh

Re: Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

Post by RobMacKillop » Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:29 am

Happy for you, Lucy.

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lucy
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Re: Sor, Fernando - op.35/22 Study in Bm - Video

Post by lucy » Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:18 pm

RobMacKillop wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 9:29 am
Happy for you, Lucy.
Thank you Rob. :)

Have to see what I can do now.
"There is no duty we so much underrate as the duty of being happy.
By being happy we sow anonymous benefits upon the world."
Robert Louis Stevenson

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