Aria 19th Century Guitar

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Topics archived from Public Space and its subforums after a long period of inactivity, or redundant for some other reason. This section is read-only.
Tubbers
Posts: 2822
Joined: Wed Apr 19, 2006 10:17 pm
Location: Enumclaw, WA

Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by Tubbers » Mon Dec 01, 2008 10:51 pm

I did a search but couldn't find anything on this model. I wanted to ask if anyone knows of a sound sample for it?

A19C-200N (Nylon String)

It comes in rosewood or mahogany with spruce top (natural or black finish) and ebony fingerboard. It's a beauty too but I can't find a pic to post.
I'd just like to hear what it sounds like.
:)
Help!

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Valéry Sauvage
Posts: 2820
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 10:07 am
Location: France - Poitou

Re: Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by Valéry Sauvage » Tue Dec 02, 2008 7:11 am

Nice one, looks like the Panormo shape. (I don't like the black finished one...) But don't know how it could sound...
V.
Count Basie: I don't worry about virtuosity. I do what I like to do. If I'm a virtuoso, that's great. If not, I'm doing what I like to do.

Tubbers
Posts: 2822
Joined: Wed Apr 19, 2006 10:17 pm
Location: Enumclaw, WA

Re: Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by Tubbers » Tue Dec 02, 2008 11:02 pm

Luthval wrote:Nice one, looks like the Panormo shape. (I don't like the black finished one...) But don't know how it could sound...
V.
Thanks. It is a beautiful guitar. I'm still searching for sound. :)
Help!

darrenini

Re: Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by darrenini » Wed Jan 28, 2009 9:40 pm

My colleague and I recently purchased one of these models for the guitar department in the John J. Cali School of Music at Montclair State University in New Jersey. The intention was to purchase an instrument for students to use in recitals when performing 19th century music.

To give it a "road test" in a performance situation, we recently used it in a concert. We are the Nova Segno Duo and perform music for mandolin and guitar on period and modern instruments. I can post sound clips from the recital (if allowed on this site?).

My early impressions of the instrument (as the guitarist in the duo) are as follows:

1) It is more Spanish in design than French.
2) The sound is more earthy as opposed to perfumey (if that makes sense?). Tarrega and Arcas sound great and idiomatic on this guitar; Carulli and crew sound muddy.
3) It is fan-braced and has a modern (rather thick) bridge. Photos on the Aria website indicate a moustache-style bridge; this is not what we got.
4) The headstock looks very Panormo; but the rest of the guitar is very, early Torres.
5) I used rectified nylon trebles (high-tension LaBella) with silver-plated basses (also, high-tension LaBella). This was an excellent set.
6) This guitar is over-lacquered and the sound suffers accordingly. It would benefit from a French polished top; but that would drive up the price.

We were able to purchase the instrument through the U.S. Aria distributor in Bartlett, TN. Got a very good deal, to boot. Apparently, this was the only existing guitar of this model available here in the states. I don't know if there are plans to routinely stock this model at U.S. stores. Mostly, you can find them in the U.K. and in Japan.

Hope this helps?

Jeanguitar

Re: Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by Jeanguitar » Thu Jan 29, 2009 9:11 am

Wow! It looks great but how it sounds. Its melody or just barks. I would like to try it once.

Jeanguitar

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Michael.N.
Posts: 7484
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 7:28 am
Location: UK

Re: Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by Michael.N. » Thu Jan 29, 2009 12:12 pm

It's neither Panormo or French Romantic/Lacote style. The body shape is all wrong for it to be so. The Bridge is a combination of Lacote/Pons with the more modern Torres tie bridge added. In other words it's a real mix. Even the head shape is only 'influenced' by Panormo.
I'm not too fond of the decoration. To many it will look 'stunning', to my Luthier eye it looks 'unbalanced' and overly fussy. This isn't an historical copy.
Much depends on the important internal construction and other important deatails. Fan bracing certainly puts it into the Spanish/Panormo type construction, which tends to give a slightly warmer tone compared with the French style ladder bracing. In the near future I hope to do samples of both types of guitar, recorded by the same guitarist whilst minimising the variables i.e. same room, same piece, same recording equipment and using identical post production techniques. This approach should go some way to highlighting the tonal differences.

Having said all of that if the Aria is relatively cheap, plays well and has some of the tonal elements of a 19 th century Spanish/Panormo style then it's no bad thing. It may well be a nice introduction to the wonderful world of 19 th century Guitars.
Historicalguitars.

candicegtr

Re: Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by candicegtr » Wed Dec 09, 2009 4:22 pm

I am so glad I found this forum. I was considering purchasing this guitar because I liked the appearance and the price point. I am a concertizing guitarist and want venture into the area of 19th century historical performance. I thought this might be a good way in, but now I'm thinking it's not. I noticed it's hybrid of styles as well and couldn't find an answer regarding the bracing. The comments from New Jersey were sooooo helpful. Thank you.

Rob MacKillop

Re: Aria 19th Century Guitar

Post by Rob MacKillop » Wed Dec 09, 2009 6:17 pm

If you want to go down the period route, for early 19thC classical works you need a Panormo or Lacote or Staffer, etc, etc, and if you want to play Tarrega you require a Torres. If you want to do both on a low budget, this one guitar will do a decent job, especially if you put nylgut or gut on it. I've played lots of original period instruments, one with Sor's signature inside, and I much prefer my Panormo copy by Simon Ambridge. Sor was very keen to buy new guitars rather than old ones, so I would encourage anyone with some finance behind them to commission a copy from a good maker. For a student looking for a taste of the 19thC, the Aria would be a good start. In my opinion, of course.

Rob

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