Open Source Music Notation

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de la seth

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by de la seth » Sun Nov 06, 2011 6:16 pm

Haven't used the software mentioned here, but I would recommend checking out Noteflight*

Free, open source, easy to use. You can upgrade to "crescendo" which has more features. And you can browse other members scores.

*Mod Edit - Commercial link removed.

flameproof

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by flameproof » Sun Nov 06, 2011 8:04 pm

de la seth wrote:Haven't used the software mentioned here, but I would recommend checking out Noteflight*

Free, open source, easy to use. You can upgrade to "crescendo" which has more features. And you can browse other members scores.
Their demo allows only two voices (an upper and a lower), if the software proper has that same limitation then it is unable to notate the great majority of guitar music.

BTW, I've never eaten slug-jam, but I can recommend it to all others.

Adilson

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by Adilson » Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:09 pm

Hello

Do you know lilypond software? Lilypond is very good, simple installation, and GNU. I used Lilypond in my favorite Operacional Sistem Ubuntu.

Thanks
Adilson

Rincewind

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by Rincewind » Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:33 pm

I bought Sibelius before these open source options started to really become available but the guitar fingering & Barre annotation is truly ghastly. Which package most intiutively and easily supports guitarist annotations? What you need is t be able to put the package into a fingering mode and then be able to select notes whilst hitting the number pad. The text then needs to position itself based on some reasonable heuristic rule, preferrable a configurable one. Creating macros, using text pad input in another window and other such nonsense - give me a break! Or am I as a software engineer expecting too much?

jack_cat
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Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by jack_cat » Wed May 22, 2013 6:12 pm

Forgive me for butting in with a probably unpopular position:
AFTER 15 YEARS of using the computer for my notation (mostly a now-obsolete thing called MusEdit, although I dabbled with various including Finale, Lilypond, and MuseScore), I went back to pencil and paper and am VERY HAPPY.

I can spread all the pages out on my desk and see what the heck I'm doing.

No, I can't cut and paste and copy, so things take a little longer, but I have lots of time to think about it without multitasking, emailing and all of the general mind-absorbing crap that comes with the computer. When I want to think about what I'm doing, I can look out the window at the trees and sunshine. This is a much better background for thinking musical thoughts than a monitor screen. I keep the guitar handy on a stand nearby just in case I need to check my work. MIDI never gives a really accurate rendition of what something sounds like on a real instrument. Sometimes when I revise I cut up existing charts and use real paste - a glue stick - to mix them in with the new parts.

Just thought I would mention it. I find that I am very productive. I have a big desk and a nice pencil sharpener, and a couple of reams of my favorite music staff paper that I had printed a couple of years ago. (Even more off-topic, perhaps, I have moved to writing all my guitar music on grand staff.)

all the best - don't let me stop you from playing with the computer...

- jack

JohnPierce

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by JohnPierce » Wed May 22, 2013 8:09 pm

jack_cat wrote:(Even more off-topic, perhaps, I have moved to writing all my guitar music on grand staff.)
:bravo: :bravo: :merci: :merci:
I wish all composers/arrangers for the guitar would do this. The grand staff makes the music much clearer.

jack_cat
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Location: Latin America

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by jack_cat » Tue Jun 04, 2013 7:09 pm

jwp wrote:
jack_cat wrote:(Even more off-topic, perhaps, I have moved to writing all my guitar music on grand staff.)
:bravo: :bravo: :merci: :merci:
I wish all composers/arrangers for the guitar would do this. The grand staff makes the music much clearer.
Well, yeah. Even on the six string, there are as many ledger lines needed above as would make another staff, and if you add another bass string, ditto for ledger lines below. The grand staff is much more suitable all the way around for modern guitar music, and so much more so for extended range instruments.

The use of the treble staff arose in late 18th cent. Italy as an adaptation of violin notation, when tablature had fallen out of favor and not everybody even had a low E string yet, and guitar technique was much more limited than it is today. Like the qwerty keyboard, it's kind of hard to shake and will likely remain the standard. But I have moved on, at least for my own purposes.

The grand staff for the guitar needs less space between the two staves than the grand staff for the piano, because no ledger lines are required between the staves for the crossing of the hands each into the other register. Just enough space for the middle C is fine. I designed my own paper in Illustrator and had a couple of reams printed out, one with two grand staff systems closely spaced for guitar duet scores, and the other for solo scores.

- jack

jack_cat
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Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by jack_cat » Thu Aug 01, 2013 2:22 am

Posted my waltzes here:
viewtopic.php?f=12&t=79059
(all in grand staff, unreadable by most as I am well aware,)
ah, yes, apologies for continuing this little detour off topic, amigos, but
Paper and Pencil is the ultimate open source notation software,
and grand staff is a great way to notate guitar music.
The computer is a wonderful communication tool but precisely for that among other reasons,
it is not a productivity tool...

- jack

jack_cat
Posts: 101
Joined: Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:18 pm
Location: Latin America

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by jack_cat » Wed Apr 24, 2019 3:45 pm

Adilson wrote:
Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:09 pm
Hello

Do you know lilypond software? Lilypond is very good, simple installation, and GNU. I used Lilypond in my favorite Operacional Sistem Ubuntu.

Thanks
Adilson
Yes, and you can spend three days tweaking one tie to make it look right on the page. And if you should happen to want to over-rule the defaults - here's a case in point: I wanted to move one symbol just a little farther to the right of the bar line. I consulted the documentation and read many posts from other users who had struggled with this issue, and who had contributed many pages of code to work around Lilypond's defaults. The bottom line was that nobody had a practical solution, and I spend half a day finding this out.

Personally I think that Lilypond's philosophy is misguided. It's a great program IF YOU ARE A PROGRAMMER and like tweaking code all day, and if tweaking code has become second nature to you. If you would rather think about music than code, like me, you might find it really a cludge. Also, Lilypond's stated goal of duplicating the old Schirmer engraving style does nothing for me. I don't need fancy engraving, I need ease of use. For this, as far as I'm concerned, nothing beats hand writing. (I still use MusEdit once in a blue moon, although I could criticize it too because of the fact that the horizontal cells are not scaleable.)

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Wed Apr 24, 2019 4:03 pm

Is this discussion linked to some other thread?

Otherwise seems a bit odd to respond to a post from seven years ago ... what am I missing?

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Kl3tz
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2018 9:00 pm

Re: Open Source Music Notation

Post by Kl3tz » Mon May 13, 2019 11:04 pm

jack_cat wrote:
Wed May 22, 2013 6:12 pm
Forgive me for butting in with a probably unpopular position:
AFTER 15 YEARS of using the computer for my notation (mostly a now-obsolete thing called MusEdit, although I dabbled with various including Finale, Lilypond, and MuseScore), I went back to pencil and paper and am VERY HAPPY.

I can spread all the pages out on my desk and see what the heck I'm doing.

No, I can't cut and paste and copy, so things take a little longer, but I have lots of time to think about it without multitasking, emailing and all of the general mind-absorbing crap that comes with the computer. When I want to think about what I'm doing, I can look out the window at the trees and sunshine. This is a much better background for thinking musical thoughts than a monitor screen. I keep the guitar handy on a stand nearby just in case I need to check my work. MIDI never gives a really accurate rendition of what something sounds like on a real instrument. Sometimes when I revise I cut up existing charts and use real paste - a glue stick - to mix them in with the new parts.

Just thought I would mention it. I find that I am very productive. I have a big desk and a nice pencil sharpener, and a couple of reams of my favorite music staff paper that I had printed a couple of years ago. (Even more off-topic, perhaps, I have moved to writing all my guitar music on grand staff.)

all the best - don't let me stop you from playing with the computer...

- jack
Same for me.
Used GuitarPro, but am now writing standard notation per hand.
Just wondering though, how do you develop a second instrument voice without playback?
Yamaha G245s
Ibanez AEG 10N II BK
Ibanez A300E-TCS
Okay Unknown
ESP JR-208 8-string
Epiphone Les Paul Studio Gothic
Yamaha RGX 121

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