Left Hand String buzz

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
MichaelBo

Left Hand String buzz

Post by MichaelBo » Sat Jan 09, 2010 4:39 pm

I searched for this topic but couldn't find any info. Probably covered in a number of headings. I get string buzz (strings buzzing on adjacent fingers - NOT frets!) when I do certain chords and am having a devil of a time stopping it. It seems to help if I raise my guitar headstock higher, but I can't seem to get that holy grail of a 90 degree fingertip angle to the fretboard. I find it mostly with things such as Estudio Esquema Armonico, Study Harmonic Diagram. This requires you to form a C chord, then move to a G7 while using your little finger to fret the C# (4th fret, A string) all the while maintaining the G7. Try holding a G7 with your little finger fretting the C#... can ANYONE get 90 degrees on all their fingers? For example, my index finger is almost on its side trying to hold the F on the first string! I get a lot of buzzing which is very difficult to stop. Any ideas on posture, ergonomics, guitar positioning, etc. to stop string buzz? Thanks all!

jjohn

Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by jjohn » Sun Jan 10, 2010 2:16 am

Try dropping your left shoulder down and move your Left elbow toward the 12th fret.You'll see whats happening.It wont take much.Dropping your shoulder will give you a better reach for the C#.

Tarbaby (1953 - 2016)

Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by Tarbaby (1953 - 2016) » Sun Jan 10, 2010 3:59 am

Hi Mike.

I don't think it's possible, or even desirable, to have all the fingers at 90 degrees to the fingerboard. I used to think so, but in Pumping Nylon Scott Tennant shows very clearly that the most natural positions for the fingers are like this:
1. The first finger plays on the left side of its tip.
2. The second finger plays just to the left of its tip.
3. The third finger plays just to the right of its tip.
4. The fourth finger makes contact on the right side of its tip.
Scott plays LOTS better than I do, so he must be right. :mrgreen:

When you play that G7 chord with the C# (it sounds ugly...), which string buzzes? The F on the 1st string? The open B string being touched by the 1st finger? Other?

Good luck!

Alan

MichaelBo

Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by MichaelBo » Mon Jan 11, 2010 5:34 pm

Alan - The example piece I mentioned is an arpeggio exercise where the C# is hit with the pinky and the middle finger dances around on the third string also. I used it as my example because of the unusual reach and how it makes the fingers press strings on an angle that is not 90 degrees. The strings that buzz during this exercise are the 3rd, 4th, and 5th. Thanks to both of you... I tried repositioning and it helps a lot. It also helps to slow down and concentrate; I can always speed it up later when I no longer buzz.

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oski79
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Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by oski79 » Mon Jan 11, 2010 5:44 pm

Bohonkie wrote:I tried repositioning and it helps a lot. It also helps to slow down and concentrate; I can always speed it up later when I no longer buzz.
Someone suggested a neat trick to me some time ago. Use a metronome. Start slowly, then speed up a few ticks at a time until you find the point where you start having buzz problems. Keep working on it at the pace just below that point, then try ratcheting it up a few ticks at a time again.
“People may say I can’t sing, but no one can ever say I didn’t sing.” --Florence Foster Jenkins

MichaelBo

Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by MichaelBo » Thu Jan 14, 2010 5:42 pm

Ah... the metronome. Easy to forget; critical to use. Thanks!

Dragonstuff

Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by Dragonstuff » Fri Jan 15, 2010 6:17 am

Wherever your elbow points, is where your "power" is going or coming from. Let your left elbow hang, as if a weight is hung from it. Then let that weight transfer to your fingers. You also must be sure to let the bottom of the guitar rest under your right arm to balance the weight of your left; kind of like using the guitar as a teeter totter. If you don't do this, you will be forced to use grip strength, which makes you sloppy with finger placement on your left hand..... Hope that helps!

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Vito Simplicio
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Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by Vito Simplicio » Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:07 am

Hello Dragonstuff,

Welcome to Delcamp. Please take the time to introduce yourself here. Need some ideas in How To Write A Great Introductory Post? This should help.

:merci: Vito
( vitO )===:::

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Evocacion
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Re: Left Hand String buzz

Post by Evocacion » Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:09 am

jjohn wrote:Try dropping your left shoulder down and move your Left elbow toward the 12th fret.You'll see whats happening.It wont take much.Dropping your shoulder will give you a better reach for the C#.
Thanks for that, jjohn! I was having problems with the G7 chord too. My third finger was touching the D string, which caused it to buzz horribly. But dropping my shoulder a trifle and moving my elbow toward the 12th fret solves the problem!

This was especially annoying because it was happening during Giuliani's 120 exercises, which are, of course, for the other hand! I suppose I could have used two other chords, rather then the C and G7, but I'm glad to have fixed the problem rather than just walked around it.

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