D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Archive of on-line classical guitar lessons from previous years.
Forum rules
The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
User avatar
Jean-François Delcamp
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 4493
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 7:49 pm
Location: Brest, France

D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Jun 14, 2011 8:43 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the new version of volume D01 that I updated today.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



First we will study some technical exercises from volume D01.
page 56 - Jean-François Delcamp (1956) Liaisons - Legature - Slurs - Ligados
page 56 - Jean-François Delcamp (1956) Accords – Chords





Finally, we'll look at 5 tunes, pages 49 to 52,
page 49 - Adrian Le Roy (ca. 1520-1598) Quatriesme bransle de poictou
In 1549, the French guitarist, lutenist, singer, editor and composer Adrian Le Roy entered into partnership with his cousin Robert Ballard. Together they founded a major publishing house. From 1551 to 1556, Adrian Le Roy and Robert Ballard published 5 books of tablature for guitar (Renaissance guitar with 5 courses of strings). Le Roy's bransles de poictou probably had their source in the popular tradition. Here the melody is accompanied by a single repeated bass note played by the thumb.
http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... leroy.html
http://www.classicalguitardelcamp.com/h ... uitar.html
http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... terne.html
Adrian Le Roy - Branle de Poictou n°4.mp3
page 50 - Fernando Sor (1778-1839) Leçon III opus 60
http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... dosor.html
Fernando Sor - Leçon opus 60 n°3.mp3
page 51 - Joseph Küffner (1776-1856) Allegretto – duo
http://www.delcamp.net/joseph_kuffner.html
Joseph Kuffner - Duos opus 168 n°4 - g1.mp3
page 52 - Adrian Le Roy (ca. 1520-1598) Second bransle de poictou
Adrian Le Roy - Branle de Poictou n°2.mp3
page 52 - Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710) Villano
Sanz Gaspar Villano.mp3
In volume D02, on page 49, you will find a chord version of this Villano in D major.
Spanish guitarist, organist, theoretician and composer, Gaspar Francisco Bartolome Sanz y Celma, born at Calanda (Teruel) on 4 April 1640, was a bachelor of theology at the university of Salamanca. Once he had finished his music studies in Spain, he completed his musical education with a journey to Italy, where he served as chapel organist to the Viceroy of Naples. When he returned to Spain, he became guitar teacher to Don Juan of Austria (son of King Philip IV of Spain).

In 1674, Gaspar Sanz published the first of the three volumes of his "Instruccion de musica sobre la guitarra española" for five-course guitar, of which one of the existing copies is preserved in the Calanda Town Hall (Ayuntamiento). In addition to being a learning method, this collection includes popular tunes and dances as well as several forms of serious music (fugues, passacailles). This work is the most complete publication for guitar of the period, and would be republished a further 8 times between 1674 and 1697. The pieces are presented in Italian tablature, i.e. inverted, with the bottom line designating the first string. He uses chord symbols in this work which are forerunners of modern notation.

Gaspar Sanz was one of the most significant guitarists, composers and theoreticians of the Baroque era. He doesn't only dominate his own century: he was to remain the essential reference in the following century for all treatises and all music publications for the guitar.

The works of Gaspar Sanz have often been arranged for the modern guitar by 20th century interpreters such as Emilio Pujol, Andres Segovia and Narcisso Yepes. Joaquin Rodrigo, the famous composer of the concerto d’Aranjuez, pays homage to Gaspar Sanz in his "Fantasía para un gentilhombre" for guitar and orchestra. From his own time right up until today, the popular themes of Gaspar Sanz's songs and dances have been passed on orally by street musicians.
http://www.guitarraclasicadelcamp.com/p ... rsanz.html




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
page 56 - Jean-François Delcamp (1956) Accords – Chords
page 52 - Adrian Le Roy (ca. 1520-1598) Second bransle de poictou
page 52 - Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710) Villano



I look forward to hearing you play them.

We have reached the end of this first year of studying together. I am intending to resume next year. The online lessons will start up again on Tuesday 6 September 2011 and, as well as lessons for the three levels covered this year, I'll be adding a new course at the fourth year level. Registration for the fourth year course (D04) will be open to members who have posted 20 messages on the forum.

My thanks to the students, to Geoff for his splendid translations, and also to Alan (Tarbaby), Rich (oski79) and lagartija who have enabled these courses to run so smoothly.

I wish you all a good summer. See you again soon.

Jean-François
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
:( + ♫ = :)

User avatar
MikeJay
Posts: 475
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 11:01 am
Location: Valais, Switzerland

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by MikeJay » Sat Jun 25, 2011 1:39 pm

Looks like I get to be first this time. Here they are, my last uploads to D01. It was a real revelation to me how useful it is to record myself and listen to the recording. I'll be going on to D02 next. I doubt that I'll get through it by the time the cycle begins again in September. I don't want to succumb to the temptation of going too fast. I will also continue to work on several of the D01 exercises.

Update: I upload the chords. Thanks again to Penelope for pointing out that I omitted them before :)
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by MikeJay on Sat Jul 02, 2011 10:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Sun Jun 26, 2011 5:24 pm

Mike, I really like the exercises you suggested to suggested to me during the 9th lesson; I 'd like to look into the Scott Tenant material when I have an opportunity. What a performer he is! Acquiring an internalized, tactile, sound-coordinated map of the fretboard and strings certainly should help my playing.

Your Bransle sounds fine, and you've got those slurs nice and smooth (even though I believe it was the chords, rather than the slurs, that were specifically asked for). On the Villano, do I hear eighth notes (or quavers) being played for the two quarter notes (or crotchets) in the opening half-measure?

Here's what I've been able to do thus far. This summer, I hope to consolidate what I've learned in DO1--working especially with the pieces that weren't requested as uploads, and probably relating what I've been learning here to some of my other musical interests. And on the horizon, DO2 beckons. I see nothing wrong with leaping ahead occasionally, if only to get a better sense of where I'd like to go.

My thanks (again, but this time in English) to Jean-François, to Geoff, and to my fellow classmates in this group. Hope your vacations are all restful, fulfilling and stimulating.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
MikeJay
Posts: 475
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 11:01 am
Location: Valais, Switzerland

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by MikeJay » Mon Jun 27, 2011 6:17 am

Hi Penelope,

you've made quite some progress in your playing since the last lesson. Bravo! Oops, you're right I should pay more attention to the assignments. I'll upload the chords later. Also you're right on the Villano. I seem to have turned the first quarter notes into eighths. Although I intend to start on D02, I will also be working on consolidation. I'm not comfortable with several of the exercises yet. I'd prefer to work on the technical points with relatively simple material than to try to come to terms with them with the harder material in D02. Have a fine summer yourself!

Robert Goodwin

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by Robert Goodwin » Wed Jun 29, 2011 7:40 am

Mike,
Another of your 'Star Pupil' performances. So well done overall that I completely missed the minor issues Penelope spotted.
:bravo: :bravo: :bravo:

Penelope,
Your progress seems to be accelerating. These were by far your best effort and done on the most advanced lesson yet!
:bravo: :bravo: :bravo:

in another thread I read about your limitation of instrument and admire your determination to keep going with what you've got. If you were in the US I would offer you the extra guitar I have but sending it to France would be more expense than the guitar is worth.

I only just started lesson 10 a few days ago after a false start on the wrong set of music but I hope to post something by about next Monday.

Penelope Phillips-Armand

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:01 pm

Thanks, Bob, that's kind of you. Right now, I'm debating with myself as to which model I would buy if I could do so tomorrow. The string length of this guitar (58 cm) may suit me better than the full 65-cm length, and so I'd be tempted to go for a 7/8 at 63cm....though I haven't yet found any of those in the local music stores, nor even for sale on e - b a y in Europe . And since I'm new to the guitar, I can still benefit from whatever exercises let me practice maneuvering around the strings and fretboard. I'd like to be able to play both classical and folk, and to the extent that some of these lessons are beginning to get into chordal accompaniment, blues, etc., I have enough to keep me entertained until fall when the training gets rigorous again.

What was your "false start": did you go forging into DO2 or DO3 without even realizing how far ahead you were of some of the rest of us?

Robert Goodwin

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by Robert Goodwin » Fri Jul 01, 2011 12:02 pm

Hi Penelope,

My final exam piece was done on a Cordoba Cadet. She is 3/4 size with a 615mm scale length. She fits my aging hand like a glove. You can see her in the D01-9 thread. My foot rest was on the highest setting to raise her up to normal playing height.

She's a little tricky to play because of the closer string spacing. Mostly I compensate by small adjustments of my right hand; rocking downward to avoid thumb contacts and upward to avoid finger contacts. This is really only an issue when playing apoyando. The finger coming to rest on the next string can accidentally touch the string that was just played causing a buzz. This is exaggerated in shorter guitars not only because of the closer spacing but because shorter lengths result in lower tension for a given tuning and more pronounced string vibration.

I bought a 'Takamine Jasmine-341' years ago just to play the cords my uncle taught me in my teenage years. This is also a 3/4 guitar. It has a laminated spruce top but a decent sound and excellent intonation up the fret board for the price. Certainly up to the quality of typical PC microphones. You can find them on e - b a y from time to time and they are fairly inexpensive. There are also some Chinese export models that are are dirt cheap but I have no idea if they are suitable for serious classical study.

My 'goto' guitar is a Cordoba j45r-63. The dash sixty-three means she has a 630mm scale. They no longer make those as far as I know. She has an incredibly rich full sound that I am slowly learning how to bring out.

My false start was due to a mix up in the sheet music and thank you for those kind words. From lesson to lesson, I am making far less actual progress than you have done. I hope you keep going no matter what.

Robert Goodwin

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by Robert Goodwin » Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:21 pm

This time I am treating this just as if I was given one week to learn and practice and then went back to my music teacher and he said "Ok, sit down and play what you've learned." No editing, no repeats.

After practicing for the week on a larger guitar, my wrist was sore and so I switched to my 3/4 guitar today so I missed some strings because of the change in size. Also I lost my place in the music one or twice.

If your aesthetic sensibilities are easily offended you might want to skip this video :lol:

I'm sure I could do much better if I had two weeks.

[media]https://youtu.be/uVDO-PmoH9s[/media]

Scott_NyLonChaney

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 10

Post by Scott_NyLonChaney » Tue Jul 12, 2011 2:21 pm

Robert Goodwin wrote:This time I am treating this just as if I was given one week to learn and practice and then went back to my music teacher and he said "Ok, sit down and play what you've learned." No editing, no repeats.
I find I am amazed at how much doing precisely that motivates me. Because that is what I have to do now. I practice a half hour in the morning now before work and as soon as I get home and change into my loungin' duds, I play for another hour, sometime more. And rarely is all my material ready in a week, though I really strive for that. I get frustrated because I want to play it perfectly and I expressed this to my instructor. He said it's like working with weights - no beginner starts out benching 250 lbs. You find the highest weight you can do 10 reps with, add some weight to that, and work back up to ten reps, add some more weight and so on over time. That 140 lbs you were struggling with when you started, is a breeze two months later when you're now struggling with 175 lbs.
He always gives me pieces that are a little harder than I can do to begin with. And the same every lesson. I don't think I've done anything yet 100% when I had to perform it for him. But then I looked back at some of the older material, and it was like, "piece of cake"!

Penelope Phillips-Armand

the benefits of overlearning

Post by Penelope Phillips-Armand » Wed Jul 13, 2011 8:10 pm

I think that's the way it works for me, too, Scott: I have to overlearn--not so much by trying to perfect a piece at my current level, but by pushing on a bit beyond that so that the earlier piece becomes easier and more obvious by comparison. When I heard this year's exam piece for DO2, it delighted me and I knew I just had to have a go at it. Though I can play it well enough to make my husband smile (apparently, it tickles him just as it does me), it still needs a lot more work--but it certainly has made the DO1 piece seem like a piece of cake, as you put it. I'm having similar experiences reviewing previous lessons from this past year's DO1 course.

Bob--That took honesty and courage, letting us in on your unedited practice session! The video medium seems a lot less forgiving than simple audio files, which can be edited fairly discreetly. By way of contrast, there are a couple of students in the French course who present incredibly polished performances--usually as audio files--as their initial attempts, and have been giving me quite a complex.
Thanks for sharing the information concerning your guitars. I've been given an appointment Friday to go and try various formats in our local music store, though the owner feels certain that even at 5'2" I should not go any smaller than 7/8...which would be just one step up from my folk guitar. I remain open minded, and I recognize that a 4/4 would give me a wider choice of models. I hope he has a mirror, so I can watch the critical angle of that left elbow.

Cheers, Penny

Return to “Classical guitar lessons archive”