D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:49 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




We are now going to work on a series of exercises:
- page 114 numbers 17, 18, 19 - Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES - ESCALAS
The following videos correspond to numbers 17, 18 and 19 on page 114. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, working to perfect the technique of position-shifting up and down the neck.




- page 124 Delcamp, Jean-François ARPÈGES - ARPEGGI - ARPEGGIOS – ARPEGIOS





Finally we'll look at 5 pieces, pages 22, 54, 55, 56, 57, 78, 79 and 88.
- page 22 Dowland, John Mistris Winters Jumpe
Here we have a "jig". 6/8 time has two beats to the bar. The strong beats are on the first and fourth quaver (eighth note). The phrase structure (see previous lessons) is of 4 bars. Bars 5 to 8 are a division (see lesson D04 n°3) on bars 1 to 4. The 3rd phrase finishes in bar 12 with a half cadence (imperfect cadence), that is one ending on the dominant. The piece concludes with a slightly modified repetition of bars 1 and 2.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadence_(music%29#Half_cadence




- page 54, 55 Sor, Fernando Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur, Segovia n°5
The phrase structure is of 8 bars. This study is a polyphonic composition in three voices. At the beginning we have the impression of hearing just a single voice. In the first section, the times when you play two notes together are rare: the 1st beat of bars 1 and 9, and the 3rd beat of bar 13.
The polyphony is only fully expressed from bar 25, when the range of pitch (also known as ambitus or compass *) becomes wider and the bass notes start to appear on the first beat of the bar.

The rest stroke is well suited to bringing out the melody (the upper voice). Use the free stroke to play the accompaniment. In this study, from the beginning to bar 24, the melody takes place within a narrow range (a fifth). This narrow range calls for a low volume (mezzo piano or mezzo forte). From bar 25, the range becomes wider, calling for the fullest sound from the guitar, with an assertive volume (forte). From bar 33, go back to the mp or mf level. From bar 41 to the end, the range becomes wider again, so go back to a more powerful volume. Reduce the volume of the last two bars gradually to conclude the study mezzo piano.




- page 56, 57 Sor, Fernando Valse opus 51 n°3
The phrase structure is of 8 bars. In this waltz, the melody of the first section, in E minor, takes place within a narrow range. For this E minor section, I advise a restrained articulation: "non legato" or "mezzo staccato" or maybe "portato".
http://www.dolmetsch.com/musictheory21.htm#accent
The range becomes wider in the second section in E major. In this E major section, the guitar is required to give its fullest sound with an assertive volume. For this section I advise a legato articulation.




- page 78, 79 Paganini, Niccolò Perigoldino
There are many repetitions, so vary the tone colour to avoid monotony.
All the phrases start with an anacrusis (pick-up note or upbeat) on the 4th crotchet (quarter note). All the phrases end on the first crotchet (quarter note) of a bar.

The piece is in the key of A, and this key allows the 3 bass strings of the guitar to be used to their best effect: E (dominant) A (tonic) D (subdominant). Observe the precise length of the bass notes, and damp them by placing your thumb on the open string.




- page 88 Tárrega, Francisco Estudio, en mi minor
Another piece in three voices. Here again I recommend that you use rest stroke for the melody (upper voice). The right-hand fingering is based on the most classic principle: the ring finger plays the first string, the middle finger plays the second, and the index finger plays the third, while the thumb plays strings 4, 5 and 6. To practise this type of fingering, see the arpeggios of Mauro Guiliani, pages 130 and 131 of volume D04.
Mauro Giuliani was the first teacher to publish a systematic study of arpeggios (http://www.guitareclassiquedelcamp.com/ ... liani.html : Opus. 1 - Studio per la chitarra, Prima parte : 120 arpeggi).
I recommend that you practise a few arpeggios each day and change them regularly with the aim of studying all of them in two years. You can hear the mp3s of the 120 arpeggios recorded by Marco Cairone here: http://www.chitarraclassicadelcamp.com/ ... 32&t=25253 .





I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 22 Dowland, John Mistris Winters Jumpe
- page 54, 55 Sor, Fernando Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur, Segovia n°5
- page 88 Tárrega, Francisco Estudio, en mi minor


Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

Pentti Kotilainen
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

LindaWoodford
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

Stewart Doyle
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor

ChrisCapener
Mistris Winters Jumpe
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
Estudio, en mi minor
:( + ♫ = :)

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Sat Jan 04, 2014 4:23 pm

Thank you for another great lesson Mr Delcamp - particularly the B minor chord, because it is the first legitimate reason I have had to play the top note of my guitar, and despite having had this instrument since I was a child, I shamefully have to admit to only finding out now, that the top fretted note is a B :ouioui: :cornet:

Apart from that, B minor is a surprisingly difficult scale! I thought that after working through the earlier ones, a satisfying pattern was emerging and things were getting easier. Although B minor of course fits the tone/semitone pattern between notes, playing A# is unusual, and I'm also thrown by this particular version of the fingering, which means playing the upward and downward parts of the scale using different positions/strings. I'm not complaining - it is very good for me to learn this. I'm just surprised to be so challenged by a scale.

The rest of the pieces are challenging too - but that's to be expected :wink:

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Sun Jan 05, 2014 10:10 pm

Just wondered what you guys were thinking about the pieces in this lesson?

For me, the Sor Ex 22 is the most challenging. I find it difficult to memorise, perhaps because the phrases are quite similar, and I find it challenging to sight read it at speed. I like the way it builds from bring mp at the start to being f in the middle and towards the end, when the bass notes also form a second melody voice. I definitely need to work on the boxed sections to allow me to play these with confidence and to match the tempo of the easier bits.

It has taken quite a while for me to get the hang of the timing in Mistris Winters Jumpe, and I had to count each bar quite slowly to work it out at first. Now that the rhythm is coming more naturally, I can begin to focus on the music and nailing the difficult bits. It's a lovely piece.

The Tarrega piece is also beautiful. My 'a' finger nail is a strange shape, and produces an overly bright sound, when I don't pay attention. I was finding it difficult to emphasise the melody in this piece by playing rest strokes with 'a', and at the same time ensure the tone was not too bright, so I started to file my nail down to the point where I have solved the 'too bright' problem, but now can't produce enough volume. Doh! I'm tempted to start filing my other nails down to compensate, but can imagine the result already!

Until I can catch up a bit on the lesson schedule, I'm just focussing on the exam pieces. The others will probably have to wait until the Summer break between courses.

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Mon Jan 06, 2014 6:35 pm

I also have a more specific point to talk about: in Sor Ex 22 measures 28/29, the first finger plays two consecutive notes (A then C natural), which means the A gets cut short to make the jump. It is technically possible to shift the fingers along by one in the preceding measure to avoid this, and the only downside is that it makes the preceding measures slightly more awkward (but not excessively so). I'm guessing the first finger jump is intentional as an exercise in quick changes, and that the A is not such an important note, so it is OK to shorten it by using the fingering as written. I just wondered if anyone else was considering changing the fingering here?

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:40 pm

Hi Linda,

Delcamp fingering for those two measures is identical to Sor's original. They both do not specify whether the lower D in bar 28 is to be played as open 4th string, or 5th string fretted with 4. However David Grimes in his 'Complete Sor Studies' seems to think Sor meant the latter option (enabling D and F# to ring together), and that would prevent offsetting the fingers by one. I personally think that slight rubato / pause is very fitting for the transition to C major chord in bar 29, so I would leave it as it is fingered, and practice to make the transition as smooth as possible, but it's your call. Last year I played bar 28 using open 4th string, which sounds very nice to me, but probably not the way Sor would have played it.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:21 pm

Thanks Marko, that's very interesting - you have a real depth of knowledge and it is very kind of you to share it.
I hadn't considered the benefit of a slight pause, but you are right in this context of a chord change.
I've also been playing with open D, but will give the fretted version a try, even if it is just to hear the difference. ....although I'm admittedly rather a long way off how Sor intended it to be played :roll:

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Pentti Kotilainen » Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:37 pm

Hello everyone! :D

I got a chance to record. There is still a lot to do :oops: , but anyhow here they are :!:

Mistris Winters Jumpe
[media]https://youtu.be/8lIojR7P7xg[/media]
Exercice opus 35 n°22, en si mineur
[media]https://youtu.be/IwmwSavDkC0[/media]
Estudio, en mi minor
[media]https://youtu.be/3RjEQldDE8g[/media]
:merci: for listening :bye:

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Wed Jan 08, 2014 9:48 pm

:bravo: Pentti, you've made a great start on each of the required pieces :casque: They are coming together nicely.

Are you continuing to work on them? I notice that the next lesson starts already next week :shock:

In case you are, I might suggest working on bringing out the melody line on the arpeggio pieces some more, with a clearer rest stroke, and by keeping the other notes softer. The last couple of lines in Ex 22 are quite difficult, and probably need some more isolated practice because you stumble both times (and I do the same too!) This piece is quite long, and I think it would benefit from altering the dynamics like Prof Delcamp suggested (or, of course, your own interpretation). What I am learning, is that you have to be quite extreme in changing the dynamics, because the recording process, and whatever happens to the file afterwards, tends to reduce the difference between loud and soft, so subtle differences are lost.

I like listening to you play - it's very relaxing and enjoyable.

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Pentti Kotilainen » Wed Jan 08, 2014 10:58 pm

Hi Linda,
and thanks for your kind words. :D

I’m not happy with my recordings at all :( , but I’m happy that I anyhow got something recorded :? .

I’ve made practically all the training with my silent guitar, but when recording I used my ordinary classical guitar. Changing over from silent guitar to normal classical made me feel as I had lost almost all the skills that I had gained when practicing these pieces. The difference was most obvious when playing the trickier passages.

I have considered and also trained with the silent guitar those issues that you just pointed out, but when recording I was feeling so clumsy that I just tried to hit the right notes. :mouton:

There is still almost a week remaining, so I’ll continue working on these pieces (both the recorded and the other pieces as well) all the available time, for sure. :chitarrista:

:bye:

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Marko Räsänen » Thu Jan 09, 2014 7:41 am

Pentti, you play well considering the difficulty with your neighbour that limits your practice to silent guitar.
But there is separate point I need to make (something I noticed already a few lessons ago). You play everything with rest stroke. You cannot do that in a piece like Sor's op35n22, because it kills most of the harmony by damping the strings that should be ringing. In Tarrega's E minor study it isn't so noticeable because the arpeggio pattern is descending (ami instead of ima), but even there in the 2nd part when the bass goes to 4th string, it is cut short when you play the 3rd string with rest stroke.

In the Tarrega and Sor studies of this lesson only the top voice (the melody) should be played with rest stroke. Everything else with free stroke.

Marko
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Pentti Kotilainen » Thu Jan 09, 2014 8:27 am

Thanks Marko,
for your sharp observations and useful comments.

Pentti

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Thu Jan 09, 2014 8:44 am

Oh of course, I completely forgot about your silent guitar. That explains a lot, and must be quite a challenge.
when recording I was feeling so clumsy that I just tried to hit the right notes
I know this feeling very well and I have a strong feeling that I will be thinking the exact same thing when I make my recordings this weekend! For me, the need to 'play safe' in order to get the basics right means that any dynamics I had been practicing either get forgotten or at least toned down. I discussed this point regarding my own recordings from the last lesson, so I'm feeling rather hypocritical in pulling you up on the same thing. However, the dynamics are an important part of the musicality, and since we can both incorporate them when practicing, I guess we just have to solve the issue of being able to replicate that under more stressful situations.

I agree with Marko's point too - my eyes/ears were not sharp enough to spot it. After playing a lot of apoyando (as we do at the start of these lessons with all the polyphony exercises), it is quite a challenge to get a sufficiently full tone from tirando. This is something I'm also working on achieving, and so far I've come to he conclusion that it is much more dependent on nail shape and is more tricky to achieve!

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Mon Jan 13, 2014 10:41 pm

OK, here are my attempts for this lesson. It's always a humbling experience to see and hear my own videos, because I just want to jump right in and criticise myself. For a start, the mic was a bit too close so some of the sound was distorted, and I really want to grab my left hand and push it more parallel to the fretboard with the knuckles closer to the edge. I can manage to do this with easier pieces, when I have space to think and remember to position it right, but as soon as the piece gets difficult, my hand defaults back to being at an angle, which paradoxically makes it more difficult to play!!

Anyway:
Dowland, Mistris Winters Jumpe
[media]https://youtu.be/6a3kVzE5hMY[/media]

Sor, Ex 22 opus 35 - I found this to be the most difficult and the tension shows very much in my left hand. I'm looking forward to learning how to do barres better in the next lesson, because although I've read a lot of theory, it doesn't yet translate into being able to put it into practice. It think the upcoming isolated exercises will help. This piece made my left hand cramp up, which is a sure sign of doing it wrong!!
[media]https://youtu.be/kqF6yNUGBiM[/media]

Tarrega, Estudio
[media]https://youtu.be/-vk_t-8IP9U[/media]

As always, :merci: for listening.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Marko Räsänen » Tue Jan 14, 2014 6:11 am

LindaWoodford wrote:Stretch goal:
To have my video upload to YouTube rejected for plagiarism of a professional CG recording :wink:
:delcamp_fiesta: :ivresse:

Congratulations Linda on reaching your goal! At least sort of. Youtube doesn't reject CG videos. It monetizes them. And I seem to notice little ad popups in your videos, which must mean that you're having some copyright claims with your Sor and Tarrega :)
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by LindaWoodford » Tue Jan 14, 2014 9:21 am

Wow you are right - I've just disputed the claims, so hopefully the ads should disappear.

Well, now that I know that YouTube sets its standards so low, I'll have to set a new goal. Perhaps it will be posting my recordings before midnight on the last day of the lesson schedule :casque:
Regards, Linda

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