D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:31 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.





Now we're going to work on a study:
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor
In the company of Tàrrega, we're going to pay a visit to fret XIX and play a top B, in bar 29. To reach this part of the fingerboard more easily you can raise your guitar up by adjusting your guitar support or your footstool to its maximum height. The path of the thumb under the neck is as follows:
1) The thumb starts off beneath the third string, opposite the middle or ring finger.
2) Then, the more the hand is moved towards the soundhole, the closer the thumb gets to the first string.
3) Finally, as you move towards the highest notes, the thumb is placed on the edge of the fingerboard, as I show you in the following short videos.






Today we'll look at 4 pieces.

- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
The first 4 bars establish the key. They present in succession D major, G major (with a D bass), A major 7th (with a D bass), and D major. That is to say, a succession of the tonic, subdominant, dominant and tonic. The tension increases from bar 1 to bar 3, reaching its maximum in bar 3, because of the presence of the dissonant interval D-C#. This increasing tension may be expressed with a crescendo. The tension disappears in bar 4, with the resolution of the dissonant interval by means of a fully consonant octave interval, D-D. We then have various modulations, into A major from bar 5 (G#), E minor in bar 11, B minor in bar 13, and G major in bar 16. From bar 23 there are many scale passages and we notice the presence, in the bass notes, of a pedal note on the A (the dominant), which eventually resolves into a perfect cadence in the very last bar of the prelude. This adaptation for guitar, like many others of this suite, is in D major, a key which offers the advantage that the tonic (D) and dominant (A) correspond to two of the bass strings of the guitar. The few bass notes that I have added are in brackets.




- page 54 Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840) Sonata n°4
This short sonata, written with admirable effectiveness, includes a rondo which is light and full of zest. Note the presence of the Alberti bass (bars 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22, 23, 48 and 50) which consists in arpeggiating the chords of the accompaniment starting with the root note, followed by the fifth, the third and then the fifth again. This Alberti bass was used particularly during the classical period (Fernando Sor, Mauro Giuliani). The rhythm of the melody is written without specifying the exact lengths of the notes. For instance, in bar 5 the melody consists of the notes played on strings 1 and 2, which, in my opinion, should sound like this: D dotted quarter note (dotted crotchet), F, E, D quarter notes (crotchets). Similarly in bars 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22 and 23. Many composers of the classical period, for example Carulli, frequently notate music in this way, without giving the exact length of the notes of each of the voices making up the polyphony. This simplification of the writing saved space on the paper and made the engraver's work easier.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass




- page 112 Zequinha de Abreu (1880-1935) Amando sobre o mar
This slow waltz from the Brazilian composer Zequinha de Abreu is made up of a melody with an extended range of pitch: from the middle D# (bar 57) to the top A (bar 11). The accompaniment should be played subtly and softly, so as to support the melody without ever drowning it out.




Julio Sagreras (1879-1942) Leccione III n°4
Here is an excellent and beautiful tremolo study. Sagreras invites us to begin by using the simplest fingering: pimi, then a more complex one: piai. Once we've mastered these fingerings, we'll go on to use the king of fingerings for tremolo: pami. Evenness of the sound and regularity of the repeated notes are essential in order to give the melody its continuity. Slow practice, together with a search for perfection in the detail, is necessary to obtain this regularity. Every note is important.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 47 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
- pages 154, 155 Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Marko Räsänen
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Håvard.Bergene
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Pat Hargan
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Goran Penic
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

piero zaninetti
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor

Eric de Vries
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
Francisco Tàrrega (1852-1909) Estudio en mi mayor
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Fri Feb 28, 2014 10:45 am

Dear Professor Delcamp or moderators, there is duplicate thread for this lesson, which should be removed.

I think this is the best and most challenging lesson so far, because the pieces are so technically varied and beautiful too! :bye:
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by GeoffB » Fri Feb 28, 2014 12:05 pm

Thank you for spotting that and reporting it Marko.

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:49 pm

Here are my required pieces. Although I had been practicing Bach's prelude for a while now, and didn't find it especially challenging compared to for example Paganini's Sonata or the lovely 'Amando sobre o mar', I still couldn't do a completely clean take of it today. In the take I'm posting there are some muscle memory lapse type of mistakes, some fingering mistakes brought on by recording tensions, and what I find rather amusing a wrong note in the end of bar 24 (a mistake I never made before), that doesn't really stand out as harmonically wrong (Bach and many others might disagree though).

Tarrega study is technically challenging, and I really struggle with the jumps to 3rd string f#. Playing above 12th fret is something I haven't really practiced before, and it made me realize why I should practice the 3 octave scales. But there's only so much time to play, and this year I've been concentrating on the right hand arpeggio patterns as far as technical exercises are concerned.

Don't be shy with your critique, especially concerning the performance of Bach prelude! I might do another take of it before the lesson is over, which will hopefully be more relaxed and more musical. :merci: for listening!

[media]https://youtu.be/QHubP1eot-k[/media]

[media]https://youtu.be/l4mjI3hC4Vs[/media]
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:46 pm

:bravo: Marko. Good job on the Tarrega... I've only played Bach this week so I've got no critique. To me it sounds quite good, and you only need more practice to avoid the small pauses and hiccups. :casque: Your Bach is set private, so I'm looking forward to listen to it. I'll try to make Bach recording this evening myself, and get started on the other lovely tunes of this lesson (the biggest challenge in D05 is that there are too many lovely tunes :D ).
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:58 pm

:merci: Håvard!

Bach video taken care of. I got a 'server error' in youtube when publishing the video, but as it seemed work fine for me, I didn't think of checking the privacy setting of that video :oops: Thanks again!

Looking forward hearing your Bach tonight. Good luck with the recording! In my experience it can be quite frustrating :lol: :bye:
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:20 pm

The Bach Prelude was also very nice. I'll make some comments (some general, and some points I guess you are aware of)
Bar 4: I try to make the last note sound a tiny bit longer to avoid cutting it short.
Bar 11: You managed this (quite technichally difficult) section well.
Bar 13: This one I also tend to forget to prepare for. Easy when remembered.
Bar 17: I've experimented with playing this without open strings to make a more consistent sound compared to bar 15+16. It is not very difficult, but I'm not sure which method is better sounding. The "no left hand rest" that Mr Delcamp do is quite cool, though.
Bar 20-21: quite demanding on fingercoordination. Well done:-)
Bar 23-30: Long runs, easy to make small mistakes
Bar 33-34: Quite easy, but at the same time difficult to avoid buzzing.
Bar 39-41: Nice clean sound. I like to add some vibrato.

For a "not clean" recording, it is very pleasant to listen to :casque: :bravo:
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sat Mar 08, 2014 8:25 am

Thanks Håvard!

My thoughts:

Bar 4: I sometimes tend to emphasize the last note by playing it louder and adding a slight fermata. But then again that sometimes feels too underlining, so my opinion regarding that note is somewhat split :)

Bar 11: Yes, that's been one of the toughest spots in the piece for me, if not the toughest. An added complication was that I only noticed a few days ago that you're supposed to switch finger '1' into the place of '2' in the middle of the bar to facilitate the playing of bass note 'b' with finger '1'. I have also managed to play the last two notes of the bar without letting go of the bass note early, but the results of doing so have been so inconsistent (pitches change easily as the strings bend) that I stopped doing it and decisively lift the bass note just before playing the last two notes.

Bar 13: Agreed. I'm not sure why it is so difficult to read ahead in the previous bar. Something in there keeps my focus until it's too late. I should probably add a big red exclamation mark, 'danger ahead' sign and an arrow pointing to bar 13. In this particular take I also forgot to damp the bass note in the end of bar 12 (that rest was something that I only noticed yesterday when warming up for the recording session), realized that, and it made me lose my concentration.

Bar 17: I haven't experimented with changing the fingering, but I try to play this bar softly to compensate for the difference between open and fretted strings (which brings to me to a another point, that it seems to me that the difference isn't as obvious in the recording as it is to behind the guitar; I wonder if that is your experience as well?) In bar 15 I play the 4th and the last notes on open 3rd string instead of 5th fret of 4th string to make it more consistent with bar 16 where 'c' and 'b' do not ring together. And this brings me to the slur markings in the piece. Obviously they cannot represent hammer-ons and pull-offs, so I pretty much decided that they are bow markings for the cello and decided to ignore them. Now when I've studied them a bit more, it looks like some of those markings group together notes that are meant to ring together, but not all notes that should ring together have such markings, and on the other hand some of the notes with markings cannot be played so that ring together. And sometimes they seem to be regular slurs (which I don't play as slurs). Can anyone give an explanation regarding these markings? Anyway, my point is that the markings group notes in bars 15 and 16 differently, which could either mean that a) I'm wrong to use the open 3rd string instead of fretted 4th string for the purpose of not letting the 'a' ring, or b) those markings here simply represent the limitations of the given fingering, i.e. in bar 16 'c' and 'b' cannot ring together with the supplied fingering, and therefore the 'slur' marking does not cover the 'b'. How many notes can you play together with a cello? Is it 2 or 3? My guess would be 2, which probably means (as I originally thought) that those 'slur' markings simply mean that they are to be played with a single strike of a bow (i.e. not change direction in-between the notes), which would make them sound legato, and not directly having to do whether the notes are kept ringing together or not (ringing notes together is the ultimate legato, but legato articulation can be achieved otherwise as well).

Bar 20-21: :merci: It is easier to play if you just let the 'b' ring throughout bar 20, i.e. don't lift the pinky in-between, but will sound inconsistent with measure 21, as you no doubt have noticed yourself :D This is one of the spots where I most often trip (and as I didn't in this particular take, suggested strongly that it was one to post :lol: )

Bar 23-30: I can usually play through these without mistakes when practicing, but it's not so easy when recording and you've made ok so far, and start to tense up for the fear of blowing up the take for some silly mistake. One of the issues here is that I haven't really considered the right hand fingering, but just go on auto-pilot sometimes using 'a' finger in the middle of i-m alternation to prevent awkward string crossings, and during recording I suddenly become too self-conscious about the right hand fingering, and realize that I don't have a clue as to which finger to use and when :D

Bar 33-34: I agree, buzzing is very difficult to avoid, especially near the end of bar 34 when the pinky plays 'a'. I also had problem for a long time, that I would play the 2nd string instead of 1st following the melody notes played on 3rd or 4th string. I was using 'm' finger for the droning 1st string 'e', and the only way I could get rid of that problem was to move to right hand fingering for that section where I assigned a dedicated fingers for strings 4 - 1 (pima). Then the problem became that the tension would increase in 'a' finger through the repeated droning 'e', and I would sometimes miss a note because of that, but I'm getting better at it, and it doesn't happen too often anymore.

Bar 39-41: Vibrato is definitely an option. I changed a few days ago from Galli medium tension strings into Hannabach medium tension, and as you may know Hannabach's medium tension is even heavier than D'Addario's hard tension. The treble strings also feel a bit slippery, so at the moment I find vibrato (especially slow one) harder to do than before, as my left hand is still adjusting for the increased tension.

Sorry for the long reply :desole:
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Håvard.Bergene » Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:31 am

:merci: Always interesting reading your comments!

Here is my recording. For some unknown reason the sound from the mic suddenly got distorted in the middle, so I had to switch to camcorder sound. Didn't notice until after tidying up the recording equipment :desole:
It is a long piece, and I can play the parts where I'm stumbling much better. Anyway I'm happy with it for a one week recording (although I had played it a couple of weeks right before lesson 1 started last year)

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Prelude BWV 1007
[media]https://youtu.be/pTsRF9YYQg4[/media]
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by EricKatz » Sat Mar 08, 2014 11:20 am

:bravo: The beginning is wonderfull!!
After, let's say the first page, the fluency is gone. On the third page you seem to catch up the feel with which you started. The end is very good. Although vibrato i.m.o. isn't appropriate in Bach pieces, it's almost inevitable at the last chords to get some sustain.
I wonder how you start to learn and practice a piece. Could it be that you tend to play it again and again from the start? That could be an explanation for the minor performance on page 2.
I have read somewhere on the forum a nice way to practice that I am applying ever since. Play the first bar 7 times, then the second one etc. untill you come a the end of a musical phrase. Then you repeat this phrase 7 times. After this you go to the first bar of the second phrase, etc.

I know about the problems with your left wrist, but maybe you should pay a little more attention to the position of your hand or the distance between your 4th, 3rd and sometimes second finger to the fretboard. Your hand seems to turn away so your fingers have to come down from about 3 centimeters. This affects the precision and the timing.

I discovered an interesting video of a master class of Denis Azabagic: search for "Denis Azabagic teaches Prelude, cello suite no. 1, BWV 1007 by J...". Please don't understand me wrong, I really don't want to compare his poor playing with your recording, but Azabagic says some usefull things about left hand position.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by EricKatz » Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:02 pm

Very good job, Marko!
The Estudio sounds beautifull. Good tone, clean and with confidence.It's very difficult to play in this high positions, above the 12th fret.The sound gets very thin. It's a combination of the quality of the guitar, the strings and the way your RH-fingers hit the strings (and maybe also the recording quality). I have the same problem.


The Bach Prelude still requires a lot of work. Most of the notes are played right, so technically it's OK. But as a listener I only enjoyed the last arpeggio's. There it becomes real music!

I find it hard to describe how you can improve this piece. First of all, in many bars the first note has no accent. And because each following note is played just as long and just as loud, it gets a bit monotone. At some points as a listener I only hear a stream of meaningless notes. But of course, first the player has to put meaning in the notes and to do this, he has to understand the music. I can't do this any better, I fear. That's why I think this piece is maybe too challenging for level D05.
The second improvement, could be to speed up. That really changes the character of the prelude into a light, whirling, almost danceable piece. Alas, that's also easier said than done.

The downside of commenting on the recording of fellow students is that it seems to suggest that you can do it better yourself. I wish that was true. The only result I experience is that the recording stress gets even bigger.

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:26 pm

:bravo: Håvard!

That was very good for a first week recording! Your video is a second shorter than mine, and with those places where you trip and start from the beginning of the bar again, I thought your tempo must be considerably faster than mine. But when I did a comparison our tempos are very close to each other. So where you lost time when you tripped and restarted, I lost it to intentional rubato and some hesitation here and there. According to my calculations, if you had managed to play without stopping and keeping the strict tempo you had in the beginning of the piece, the duration of the piece would have been 2:57, whereas mine would have been 3:01. I had some non-playing time in my video, perhaps worth of 4-5 seconds, but still 15 seconds is lot to lose in 3 minute piece, especially a baroque piece :D What worries me is that I didn't really notice slowing down that much when recording the piece. You, on the other hand, as far as I can tell, kept the tempo very constant, apart from those few places where you tripped.

It's an interesting question that, should we slow down in performance if we start to fear that we may trip (possibly in a way that goes unnoticeable by most), or keep the tempo as it is, and take the risk of tripping? But perhaps more interesting and relevant question is, how should we practice? As the pieces are getting longer, it's a waste of time to use slow practice for the whole piece. Also, at least this prelude is overall difficult enough, that it needs to be practiced from the beginning to the end. There are few "boxed sections" in there, but you cannot seriously expect to learn to play it fluently in a week by concentrating mostly in the most difficult bits. What I do then is to pick up a relatively brisk tempo, and when I trip, I practice those sections slower. This means that I will learn to play the various parts of the piece at different tempos. I guess it's better to practice the easier bits fast than slow, but the flip side of the coin is perhaps that it shows in my "performances" posted here, where I tend to slow down in various places, I guess, out of habit, for additional security.

Anyway, back to your performance. I think you did an excellent job in bringing the melody out in the arpeggios. I also think your tone was good this time, especially in the first part where the external microphone was still working. You managed to avoid the 1st string buzzing in bars 33-34. Your left hand chord changes are quick enough. I think most of your problems are in scale patterns, synchronizing the right and the left hand fingers to play at exact same time. I don't think it's a co-incidence that when you tripped, it invariably happened during a scale. Also your tone seems to suffer a bit when you're playing a scale. So unless you're already doing it, I would recommend adding some scale practice to your daily warmup routine, concentrating on the accuracy and musicality of playing. Your playing has improved quite a lot during this year, but I think scales are still your weakest point, and you tend to rush them through rather than think them as an actual part of music. Ok, I'm exaggerating a lot here, but I hope you understand what I mean, even though don't necessarily agree :D
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sat Mar 08, 2014 2:01 pm

:merci: for your comment Eric!

I agree with you completely regarding the estudio. In addition my guitar seems to have a resonant mode right at the frequency of that top note 'b' which makes it sound very strong (so much that I can easily clip the recording level with it), but very short sustain.

Regarding the prelude, I was quite surprised myself when I heard the recording. The biggest thing was that the 1st string notes in the arpeggios really came up much louder and punchier in the recording than I had intended (or heard behind the guitar), and the bass notes fainter. I used roughly the same mic position as in last lesson, so this was rather surprising for me. I believe this may partly explain why you feel that there is no accent on the first notes. The second half of the explanation is that I didn't want too strong emphasis on the first beat, only a subtle one, and in combination with the issue in recording, the dynamics of the notes got a bit lopsided. I've also had some problems especially with my previous strings, that the 4th string sounded to me much louder than other strings with somewhat nasty resonant metallic tone, so I may have continued to adjust on that in my playing to beyond what is needed. Do you think that could explain what you hear, as the open 4th string is played as the opening note on the first five bars of the piece, or does the problem continue beyond that with other bass notes?

It could be of course that you and I simply see very differently how this piece should be played, because I won't admit not understanding the piece, although I won't claim to be any kind of expert in Bach interpretation. I do agree with you that it's far from perfect, but I don't agree with your perceived lack of musicality in my performance. Of course the difference is that you only heard my recording, but I also know how I intended the recording, and excluding the issues mentioned above it doesn't sound to me that different from what I intended it to sound like. It could of course simply be that you were expecting to hear a world class interpretation of the piece from me, in which case I don't feel too bad in letting you down :D But I guess that the pieces get selected to these lessons based on their technical difficulty, and not so much considering the chances that the students would be able to interpret the music as well as the best players in the world. I personally see these pieces mainly as vehicles for technical development. I don't have the interpretation skills of a professional guitarist, and usually people don't expect it. That is of course not to say that one shouldn't develop in that as well.

It is of course natural to disagree about musical performance, as I don't think there could exist an artist of whose performances everyone would enjoy. What troubles me is, assuming that we're dealing with a technical issue is that I don't know whether the issue is with my guitar sounding very different to any listener in the same room than it sounds to me, or whether the issue is purely in recording. Or if it's just my playing (in the sense that if you were in the same room holding your head next to mine as I play, would you still think the same thing about my performance?). That's where a real live teacher would be very valuable.

It could be helpful (and appreciated) if you could post just a few bars from the beginning (or whatever section you think I play the worst) to demonstrate how you think it should sound. Then I would at least know to which degree it is a matter of different tastes, and perhaps I would better understand what you're saying about the accentuation. I just listened to Yo-yo Ma's performance from Spotify, and he didn't appear to put much emphasis on the first beat. His tempo was naturally much faster than mine :lol:
Eric de Vries wrote:The downside of commenting on the recording of fellow students is that it seems to suggest that you can do it better yourself. I wish that was true. The only result I experience is that the recording stress gets even bigger.
So true, Eric! I guess part of the problem will always be that you need to compare against something, that something being yourself, the other class mates, the professionals etc. And it is always very hard to comment before you have recorded yourself, because it is only then that you will find out how does the image of your own playing (inside your head) translate into an actual recording, how hard will it be to get a clean(ish) take, and you'll get a point of reference to extrapolate from other people's recordings to how they might perceive their own playing, their practice methods etc. as has been already been discussed in this thread.

I'm enjoying the discussion very much! :merci: everyone!
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sun Mar 09, 2014 4:47 pm

Here's my taken on the tremolo study. I wanted to make a video of it to see where I stand with my tremolo. It is as could be expected without regular tremolo practice :D

This time I lowered the microphone close to the floor, and even though the first string still sounds surprisingly loud (I tried to play the tremolo with very quiet, but should have played the basses still louder), I think the overall tone is now fuller than ever before.

I probably won't have time to work on the tremolo for now, but any comments are still welcome! I should probably also say, that I'm not as familiar with this study as I should be (to post a fluent take), so there is some hesitation in some of the position changes especially towards the end.

:merci: for listening, and sorry for the poor lighting :(

[media]https://youtu.be/2UyRz45-DMY[/media]

P.S. Eric, I enjoyed that Denis Azabagic teaching video very much. I also then realized that when you said "Please don't understand me wrong, I really don't want to compare his poor playing with your recording" you weren't referring to Mr. Azabagic, but his student :) Anyway, lots of good technical points in that video, although ideally I would have wanted to learn more about the interpretation of the piece.
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 08

Post by Pat Hargan » Sun Mar 09, 2014 6:51 pm

:bravo: Marko, you have done a great job on these pieces. Excellent tone as always. I'm surprised at what you say about the relative difficulty of these pieces, as I find the Tarrega easier than the Bach, so maybe your judgment is based on the fact that you have been working on the Bach for longer. On the other hand, maybe it has something to do with my guitar having a cutaway - even though I am trying to pretend that it is not there for the purpose of this study, so as to practise the 'demanche'.

I don't know the significance of the markings in the Bach; they are clearly not slurs. I have been ignoring them.

The tremolo study needs to be faster, but you are right to play it slowly and accurately until you are ready to play it faster. Are you using pami? I couldn't tell because of the low light, and because my connection is slow and tends to default to the lowest-quality video.

:bravo: Håvard, you have done very well with the Bach in one week's practice. But I think you need to have patience and play the piece at a slower pace until you are able to play it at the tempo that you prefer. The first few bars are easy, but then you hit a passage that gives you difficulty. In my opinion, you should isolate such passages and practise them until you can play them at the same speed at which you are able to play the easier parts. Marko raised some interesting questions about practice and tempo - for me, the correct tempo is the tempo at which one can accurately play the most difficult parts of the piece.

Eric, reading your comments I feel that you are looking for a level of interpretation that presupposes a technical command much higher than what we are capable of here. And I have to disagree with this:
At some points as a listener I only hear a stream of meaningless notes. But of course, first the player has to put meaning in the notes and to do this, he has to understand the music.


Surely the 'meaning' is inherent in the notes, thanks to the genius of the composer?! Of course, the job of the performer is to reveal this structure as clearly as possible, which requires some understanding, but it is impossible to make this particular sequence of notes meaningless. You might also say: 'first the listener has to hear the meaning in the notes, and to do this he has to understand the music'.

I hope to post my own attempts at these pieces tomorrow. :bye:
Raimundo 660E - D'Addario Pro Arté EJ45 Normal Tension

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